Costa ruled out of Maribor clash as injuries hit Chelsea

first_imgBy Martyn HermanChelsea will be without striker Diego Costa for their Champions League clash at home to Maribor on Wednesday.“He hasn’t trained because he’s not in condition to do so,” manager Jose Mourinho told a news conference on Monday.“It’s the same problem that he is having, it’s simple. Let’s see what happens for the next weekend.”Costa, who has made a stunning start to his Chelsea career with nine Premier League goals since joining from Atletico Madrid, has been struggling with a hamstring injury and did not play in the 2-1 defeat of Crystal Palace on Saturday.Chelsea are well-placed in Group G with four points from their opening two fixtures but have several players unavailable for the visit of the Slovenian outsiders to Stamford Bridge.Midfielders John Obi Mikel, Andre Schurrle and Ramires will all play no part while striker Didier Drogba is not fit enough to play for 90 minutes, according to Mourinho.“Mikel made a big effort to be available for the weekend. He came back from the national team with a foot problem. He can’t play tomorrow,” he said.“Didier is not in condition to play 90 minutes but he can play.”He confirmed that 17-year-old reserve team striker Dominic Solanke would start on the bench.last_img read more

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Calorie-counting menus?

first_imgSACRAMENTO – A Big Mac, large fries and large chocolate shake for lunch? The calories in that meal – about 1,470, according to McDonald’s Corp. – are about two-thirds of what nutrition experts say a typical, sedentary middle-aged man should consume in an entire day. Most people don’t know that. It’s that kind of nutritional knowledge gap the California Legislature is trying to close. The state Senate on Thursday passed a bill that would require chain restaurants such as McDonald’s to post the calories in their meals on menu boards. They also would have to include information about fat and sodium content in their printed menus to help consumers make better choices about what they eat. The measure was sent to the Assembly on a 22-17 vote, despite opposition from the restaurant industry. “I am struck by the fact that there is more fat content in some salads with dressing than there is in sirloin steak,” said state Sen. Carole Migden, D-San Francisco. “It’s just reasonable to let people know the calories they will ingest.” A recent statewide Field Poll of 523 registered voters found that 68 percent of people could not correctly pick between menu items based on their calorie, salt or fat content. Sen. Dave Cox, R-Fair Oaks, said the bill could cause even more confusion for consumers who often don’t know the difference between trans fat and saturated fat. He said some restaurant chains would have to double the size of their menus to include all the required information. “You’re going to be providing information that no one really cares about,” said Cox, who voted against the bill. Those who do care often can find the information posted inside restaurants or on restaurant chains’ Web sites. “Somehow we’ve gotten it into our minds that government can tell us how to live,” Cox said. “It’s not the restaurant’s responsibility to give it (nutrition information) to us. It’s our personal responsibility.” McDonald’s already offers a nutrition counter and ingredients list, along with a Happy Meal site that includes healthier suggestions for children, such as, “Why not swap fries for carrot sticks … at no extra cost?” A Happy Meal, marketed for children, can contain half the calories and fat that a full-grown adult should eat all day, health organizations say. The Senate bill applies only to chains that own 10 or more restaurants in California. It does not apply to daily specials or extras such as cheese or guacamole requested by diners. The calorie counts and other information also do not need to be exact for each meal. Rather, they should be estimated in a “good faith effort,” said the bill’s author, Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Los Angeles. He dismissed criticism that SB 120 would unfairly burden restaurant chains. “If a restaurant can tell you how to super-size your meal, they can tell you how many calories are in it,” Padilla said. The measure is supported by organizations fighting diabetes, cancer and heart disease. But the 22,000-member California Restaurant Association fears it will invite frivolous lawsuits over the disclosure rules. “America has gotten to the point where we have warning labels on just about everything,” said J. Justin Wilson, a senior research analyst with the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Consumer Freedom, which is partly funded by the restaurant industry. “We don’t need government to tell us the difference between salad and a 12-piece bucket of chicken.” The U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than half of California adults are obese or overweight. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans now get about a third of their calories while dining out. Since March, New York City restaurants have been required to list the calories on standard menu items. Legislation similar to California’s also has been proposed in other states, including Arizona, Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Vermont.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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