O.H.B.S 2010: Co-Motion and Their 24.6 Pound Racing Tandem and Brand New 2011…

first_imgSince 1988 Co-Motion has been turning out quality handmade bicycles in Eugene, OR. Based on what we found at their booth this year, that tradition is alive and kicking.Pictured above is a Sram Red equipped aluminum racing tandem coming in at a super light claimed weight of 24.6 pounds. It feels very odd lifting a tandem that is lighter than my daily commuter.Beyond the break you will find more of this bicycle, a couple more trick tandems, and the all new City View. Belt drives are becoming more and more prevalent. Co-Motion built up this tandem with a Rohloff internally geard 14 speed hub and Gates Carbon Drive belt system.A belt was also used instead of a timing chain.The rear belt drives the Rohloff 14 speed hub. Up front you will find a 14 speed twist shifter at the bar end.For those of you who don’t ride two per bike, you might be interested in the new for 2011 City View. Co-Motion has opted for a Shimano Alfine setup, instead of their usual Rohloff hub to keep the price down. The City View will run you $3595.00 for a complete build, or $1995.00 for the frameset. The City View comes in about $1600 less than its Rohloff equipped counterpart.There is an included Nitto front rack.Surprise, there is a belt drive running that Alfine 8 speed hub. The forthcoming 11 speed Alfine hub will be an option starting in December, costing an extra $300. Co-Motion replaced the timing chain with a belt drive. They claim it shaves about two pounds off the complete build.Co-Motion had a travel ready tandem on display as well. It will break down and fit into two flight cases.last_img read more

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Pippin Book Writer Roger O. Hirson Dies at 93

first_imgRoger O. Hirson, an acclaimed writer of stage and screen whose major Broadway success was as book writer of the hit musical Pippin, died on May 27 at home in New York City, according to The New York Times. He was 93.Hirson was born in New York City on May 5, 1926. After serving in the army, he earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Yale University.He made his Broadway debut writing the libretto to the musical Walking Happy (1966), featuring music by James Van Heusen and lyrics by Sammy Cahn. The show ran 161 performances at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre and marked Hirson’s first Tony Award nomination.Hirson next collaborated with songwriter Stephen Schwartz, director-choreographer Bob Fosse and star Ben Vereen on Pippin, which opened at the Imperial Theatre in 1972, later moving to the Minskoff Theatre and running for five years, clocking in 1,944 Broadway performances total. The musical earned Hirson his second Tony nomination, with Vereen triumphing for his turn as The Leading Player and Fosse winning a pair of Tonys for his work.Early in his career, two of Hirson’s straight plays were produced off-Broadway, Journey to the Day (1963) and World War 2 1/2 (1969). Later on, his Hollywood writing work netted him an Emmy nomination for the drama series The Adams Chronicles (1976).Four decades after Pippin opened, the musical received an acclaimed Broadway revival (2013), which won the Tony Award for Best Musical Revival in addition to wins for director Diane Paulus and stars Patina Miller and Andrea Martin.Years after the initial success of Pippin, Hirson excelled on-screen as writer of the miniseries A Woman Named Jackie (1991), about the life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. It marked his final major writing credit.Hirson is survived by his sons, David and Christopher, and a grandson. View Comments Ben Vereen with the Broadway cast of Pippin (1972)(Photo: Martha Swope/NYPL)last_img read more

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Spotted in Prairie Village: Angry-looking birds

first_imgThis pair of birds were sighted in the backyard of the northern branch office of the Prairie Village Post and the pictures were taken by our contributing editor Daniel M. Blom. The hawk was seen at the water garden and shortly after this picture was taken did a face plant in the pond while hopping down to a lower ledge:The owl showed up later that evening in the same area and has been making more appearances since the toads have re-appeared and started singing at night.As always, if you have wildlife pics you’d like to share with our readers, send them our way at stories@shawneemissionpost.com.last_img read more

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Section offers free CLE program

first_img May 15, 2007 Regular News Section offers free CLE program Section offers free CLE program The General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Section is making its most recent five-hour ethics CLE program available at no charge to its membership as a way of saying “thank you” to its members according to Michael Olexa, the section’s chair.In February, the section sponsored its Second Annual Florida Law Ethics Update CLE, designed to mirror its long running Annual Florida Law Update program held each year during the Bar’s Annual Convention.“The Ethics Law Update is somewhat unique in that it allows participants to secure all of their needed ethics credits by attending one seminar,” said Linzie Bogan, program organizer and the section’s immediate past chair.At a fee of $75, the CLE is also available to nonmembers of the section. Requests must be received no later than September 1 by visiting www.gpssf.org. Once there, click the “Ethics CD offer” or contact Ricky Libbert at rlibbert@flabar.org.Plans are also underway for the section’s Annual General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Conference that will provide section members with an opportunity to attend informative programs and otherwise meet with other practitioners who have similar practice dynamics. The program is tentatively scheduled for October in a location yet to be determined.last_img read more

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The Alter Group To Develop 605,700 SF Distribution Building

first_imgThe Alter Group announced plans to develop a speculative 605,700 SF cross-dock warehouse/distribution center valued at more than $36M at its 162-acre Buckeye Logistics Center at Buckeye Rd. and 67th Ave. in Phoenix, said Michael J. Alter, President of the Chicago-based national commercial real estate development firm.Groundbreaking is expected to take place in October.According to Patrick E. Gallagher, Senior Vice President, “The Alter Group is presently talking to several capital partners to finalize the underwriting for this bulk distribution building. . There are only a couple of large warehouse/distribution buildings still available in this segment of the market; vacancy rates for spaces above 500,000 SF, particularly in the Southwest submarket where Buckeye is located, are currently in the low single digits.“The West Valley has become one of the top areas in the southwest part of the United States for the development of large warehouse facilities to store, package and ship consumer goods ordered via the Internet. The southwest Phoenix market recorded 3.7 million SF of net absorption over the last four quarters of 2011.Absorption was lower in 1Q 2012 but activity is strong. This steadily increasing user demand, combined with a lack of construction, has vacancy rates continuing to fall. With very few larger buildings available, rents are projected to increase by 20% by 2Q 2013 for large blocks of space.”The new building will feature 32’ clear ceiling height; 112 dock high and four drive-up level doors; as well as parking for 324 cars and 173 trailers.Buckeye Logistics Center is strategically located 1.2 miles from I-10 via two full interchanges at 67th Ave. and 75th Ave. The site, ideally suited for regional distribution, also has good access to I-10, which is important for receiving and sending shipments to Southern California markets and ports. Buckeye Logistics Center can support up to 3.1 MSF of distribution space. Three distribution buildings totaling 1.7 MSF have already been built at Buckeye Logistics. Phase I and II were awarded the NAIOP Industrial Project of the Year in 2007 and 2008. Current tenants in the earlier phases are Amazon.com, which occupies more than 1 MSF, and Kellogg’s.For more information about The Alter Group, visit The Alter Group’s website at altergroup.com.last_img read more

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PEOPLE TO KNOW 2013

first_imgPeople To Know 2013Honoring the Brightest Stars of Arizona’s CRE IndustryThe commercial real estate industry is constantly changing, affecting all levels of employees as well as both large and small companies. Economic circumstances further enhance the industry’s volatility — and the Metro Phoenix and Metro Tucson marketplaces are not immune to those changes.When we published the first edition of People to Know in 2008, AZRE magazine brought its readers some of the most well-respected and knowledgeable experts in the industry. This year’s edition is no different.It was quite a feat to track down some people who had moved on, companies that had left the area, and new ones that were coming in, but we have done our best to bring you a useful and informative resource to further support the local industry’s mission of building great communities throughout Arizona. From developers, the new “Up and Comers,” and more, you will find it all within these pages.This year, nominees were evaluated be a selection committee using the following criteria: length of time in the community; accomplishments in the commercial real estate industry; and work in the community. From the individuals in this publication, AZRE will elect the top person in the industry in their respective category. The winners were honored at a reception May 16 at the former McCormick and Schmicks restaurant at the Esplanade. The industry leaders, announced at the event, will be featured in the July/August 2013 issue of AZRE.Let us know what you’d like to see, what other information we could include that would be useful, and any other comments you’d like to share with us to make this publication the best it can be.Peter Madrid, EditorTake it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.last_img read more

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Stapley Corporate Center sells for $32.5M

first_imgBuchanan Street Partners, a Newport Beach-based real estate investor, has acquired Stapley Corporate Center, a two-building, Class A office property located at 1840 and 1910 South Stapley Drive in Mesa, Arizona. The acquisition reflects Buchanan Street’s continued investment strategy in the Phoenix area, a market where the firm has been an active buyer of commercial and multifamily assets. Stapley Corporate Center was purchased for $32.5 million from The DESCO Group, Inc., the original developer that built and has managed the property since 2007. The 180,000-square-foot property is 90 percent occupied with long-term leases in place, including tenants Cigna Healthcare and Wells Fargo.Chris Toci and Chad Little of Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona represented the seller in the transaction, while Buchanan Street represented itself. Mark Gustin of Jones Lang LaSalle will handle leasing for the property.“This property will continue to attract top tenants seeking high-image office space in the East Valley, based both upon the quality of the building and the continued Phoenix recovery,” said Brian Payne, Vice President of Buchanan Street Partners. “The project benefits from a location adjacent to executive housing in Gilbert and is in close proximity to more than 2 million square feet of retail services in the immediate area.”Stapley Corporate Center has immediate access to Highway 60 and is near the border between Mesa and Gilbert, a city with the second highest household income in the Phoenix area and the highest concentration of graduate and professional degrees among western U.S. cities.The investment is part of Buchanan Street’s continued value-add investment strategy in the Phoenix area, a market where the investor now owns 1.4 million square feet of properties. Buchanan Street acquired two Phoenix area properties earlier this year, including Mesa Corporate Center, a 106,077-square-foot Class A office building in Mesa, and Vue Park West, a 260-unit luxury apartment community in Peoria, Arizona.In addition to investing in the Phoenix area, Buchanan Street has targeted Southern California, Houston, Texas, the San Francisco Bay Area and Denver, Colorado for acquisitions. The firm has recently added six new hires as it expands its growing investment and lending businesses.last_img read more

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News Scan for Apr 10, 2014

first_imgExperts differ over Cochrane antiviral findingsA Cochrane review that included published studies as well as unpublished drug-company data for the two most common antiviral drugs for flu—oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza)—found that they can shorten symptoms by about two thirds of a day but can cause side effects. The investigators also found few data to support stockpiling the drugs for pandemic or seasonal flu, according to reports today in BMJ.The findings were similar to what the group found in a 2012 meta-analysis that included only published data, but the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and several leading flu experts took issue with the group’s methodology and conclusions.The review included 43 trials on oseltamivir and 54 on zanamivir and was restricted to randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which are considered the gold standard of evidence. The analysis found that oseltamivir shortens flu symptoms by 0.7 days (from 7.0 to 6.3 days) and zanamivir by 0.6 days (from 6.6 to 6.0 days).The team found no evidence of a reduction in hospitalizations or serious flu complications but calculated that oseltamivir increased the risk of nausea and vomiting in adults by about 4% and in kids by 5%. They also found a 1% increase in psychiatric events when oseltamivir was used to prevent influenza.The authors recommend changing antiviral guidance in view of their results.In a statement today, however, the CDC pointed out that the Cochrane review, because of its focus on only RCTs and therefore on only outpatients with mild flulike illness, did not address whether the antivirals reduce complications of severe flu, which is a main concern for both pandemic and seasonal flu. The RCTs also didn’t address key risk groups like the elderly, pregnant women, and those with underlying conditions, the agency said.The CDC also said the review did not consider data “from an abundance of observational studies,” which have limitations but can provide useful data. “Observational studies are especially important when data from RCTs are unavailable to address questions relevant to specific outcomes (like severe disease) or to certain high-risk groups,” the agency said.The CDC said its guidance on antiviral drugs for flu will not change because of the report.Several flu experts expressed similar concern over the Cochrane findings in an NBC News story today. “We know that antivirals saved lives during the (2009 H1N1 swine flu) pandemic, and we risk losing one of the few weapons we have because of overly negative publicity,” said Peter Openshaw, MBBS, PhD, of Imperial College London.Apr 10 BMJ study on oseltamivir Apr 10 BMJ study on zanamivir Apr 10 BMJ press release Jan 19, 2012, CIDRAP News story on previous Cochrane review Apr 10 CDC statement Apr 10 NBC News story Live attenuated H7N9 vaccine looks promising, researchers sayUS scientists report that they have developed a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) against the H7N9 virus that looks promising enough for testing in humans.In a report yesterday in the Journal of Virology, the scientists say they created the vaccine by joining the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase genes from an H7N9 virus to the six internal genes from a cold-adapted flu virus called A/Ann Arbor/6/60. The researchers are from MedImmune, which makes live attenuated flu vaccines, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.The reassortant virus grew poorly in eggs, but by growing it repeatedly in eggs and mammalian cells, the scientists identified two HA mutations that improved the yield in eggs 10-fold without affecting the virus’s antigenicity. They also found that these same two HA mutations improved the growth properties of an inactivated H7N9 vaccine.When the live vaccine was tested in ferrets, it completely protected them from the targeted H7N9 strain and protected them almost as effectively from an H7N7 virus. “Therefore, this H7N9 LAIV candidate has been selected for vaccine manufacture and clinical evaluation to protect humans from wt [wild-type] H7N9 virus infection,” the report says.Apr 9 J Virology abstract  About 3% of blood donors in French Polynesia have Zika virusAbout 3% of blood donors in French Polynesia, which is experiencing a large outbreak of Zika virus infections, tested positive for the virus, according to a report today in Eurosurveillance.Investigators tested samples from 1,505 donors by polymerase chain reaction, finding Zika virus in 42 of them, or 2.8%, which the authors called “unexpectedly high.” They also noted that testing for the virus as well as for dengue virus, which is also circulating in the country, has slowed the supply of available blood for transfusions.”This report serves as a reminder of the importance of quickly adapting blood donation safety procedures to the local epidemiological context,” they conclude. French Polynesia has had about 28,000 Zika cases, affecting about 11% of the population. Zika virus, as well as the viruses that cause dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and about 70 other diseases, is a flavivirus.Apr 10 Eurosurveillance reportlast_img read more

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As US COVID-19 cases climb, Trump scraps weekend travel

first_imgCOVID-19 cases in the United States are at an 8-week high, with early signs of a rise even in the Northeast, as questions continued to swirl about President Donald Trump’s health and the extent of spread linked to the White House.Cases rise in 28 statesThe United States reported 56,191 cases yesterday, according to Johns Hopkins tracking, marking an 8-week high, CNBC said in its analysis, noting that new cases have been rising over the past 4 days. Only two states—Alabama and Hawaii—are reporting declines, with 28 showing upward trends and 20 holding steady, CNN reported.Meanwhile, an analysis from the New York Times said cases are creeping upward in the Northeast, a former hot spot that won praise for driving down its cases to very low levels. In New York City, confusion and anger are growing in some neighborhoods targeted for school and business closures because of rising cases, with Orthodox Jewish groups and Brooklyn’s Roman Catholic diocese filing lawsuits.New Jersey health officials yesterday warned the state to brace for a second wave that could escalate quickly, as the state’s daily total yesterday hit its highest level in 4 months.Meanwhile, in its latest forecasts on COVID-19 deaths, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said the nation’s fatalities could reach 233,000 by the end of October. So far, the United States has reported 7,648,256 cases, along with 213,390 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins online dashboard.White House probe intensifiesIn new developments with the White House cluster, the White House has tapped two CDC epidemiologists to help identify who may have been exposed to the virus, the Washington Post reported. A CDC spokesman said one epidemiologist has been at the White House since March, and a second arrived recently.President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump’s infections were first announced on Oct 2, hours after news that one of his closest aides had tested positive. Since then, 37 infections have been linked to White House staff and their associates, including several who attended a Sep 26 Rose Garden event for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. The latest cases appear to include two more White House residence staff workers, the New York Times reported.Health officials in Washington, DC, sent an open letter to community members asking anyone who worked in the White House in the past 2 weeks or attended the Sep 26 Rose Garden event to get tested for COVID-19 and self-quarantine. Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell yesterday said he’s avoided the White House since August because of its lax coronavirus protocols, Politico reported.Tony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and member of the White House coronavirus task force, told CBS News today that the White House is the site of a superspreader event. “The data speak for themselves.”Details still murky on Trump’s illnessAfter Trump received clearance from his doctor to hold campaign events in Florida and Pennsylvania over the weekend, media reports say the campaign has now scrapped the plans owing to logistical challenges. His latest plan is to address supporters tomorrow from the balcony of the White House, ABC News reported, citing White House sources familiar with the planning.Trump had said he would likely to be tested today, but so far there is no word on whether he is still testing positive, and his spokespeople have not said when his last negative test result was, raising questions about where and when he was exposed to the virus, as well as about who else may have been exposed after he contracted COVID-19.Meanwhile, the possibility of another COVID-19 stimulus package is still up in the air, after Trump scuttled negotiations on Oct 6, then a day later reversed course by pushing standalone funding for airlines and direct payments to Americans. Today, ahead of more talks between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Trump pushed for a $1.8 trillion package, up from the White House’s previous offer but still below the $2.2 trillion that House Democrats have proposed, CNBC reported.last_img read more

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New Mexico Governor Announces Mass Gathering Ban Expanded To Include Houses Of Worship

first_imgSTATE News:In-person services risk spread of COVID-19SANTA FE – Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has announced this afternoon that houses of worship must now abide by a public health order banning mass gatherings to mitigate COVID-19 spread.Houses of worship were previously exempt from the public health emergency order banning mass gatherings, defined as five or more people in a single confined space. That order was amended Saturday – find it attached.In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, many New Mexico congregations had already canceled in-person services before the amended order.“I am so grateful for the support and cooperation from the vast majority of religious leaders of all faiths who have already made the difficult decision to cancel services in the interest of the health and safety of their members,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “I understand the tremendous social and spiritual burden this places on New Mexicans, but ultimately, we must do everything we can to limit the spread of COVID-19, including being absolutely clear that mass gatherings of any type are not permitted in houses of worship,” she said.Of the 39 states that have implemented stay-at-home orders, only 11 now have exceptions for religious gatherings, and most of those require social distancing at services.Most New Mexico churches, synagogues and mosques have already ended face-to-face gatherings, and many Christian churches are planning virtual Easter services via livestream, broadcast or other technical means.“We know that you want to practice your faith, as you should. But this year we must remember that home is holy. The best thing you can do for your community is to stay there,” the governor said. “While this will be emotionally difficult for so many New Mexicans, public health must be the top priority. The only way to slow the spread of COVID-19 is by staying home and minimizing all person-to-person contact.”last_img read more

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