Marcus & Millichap sells CenPho multifamily portfolio

first_imgCommercial real estate investment firm, Marcus & Millichap (NYSE: MMI), announced the sale of its Lin Lor Portfolio, a 71-unit portfolio with four properties located in the Camelback Corridor and Biltmore area, for $5,112,000.Rich Butler and Brian Tranetzki, multifamily investment specialists in Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office had the exclusive listing and negotiated the transaction on behalf of the seller, a partnership out of the Chicago area as well as the buyer, a locally based private investment company.“The Lin Lor Portfolio is a centrally located portfolio of 71 units within four separate apartment buildings with a highly desirable unit mix. The project’s location and spacious, well-designed floor plans appeal to the vast rental pool of young professionals living throughout the Camelback Corridor and Biltmore area. Its vintage and urban mid-century architecture provide the opportunity to update the properties to boutique modernized communities which are more in line with the submarket,” Butler said.“The properties within the Lin Lor Portfolio enjoy the benefit of convenient access to all parts of the Valley via the Piestewa Freeway, bus lines, and the Metro Light Rail which serves downtown Phoenix through to Sky Harbor Airport, ASU and Mesa,” Marcus & Millichap’s Tranetzki said.last_img read more

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Trump had a stronger connection with the studio audience in first 2016 presidential debate

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter “I was fortunate enough to work with an interdisciplinary group of scholars to explore this question more fully during this past presidential election. More generally, my training as a political scientist included an emphasis on human ethology — this came into play while I was following a passion of mine: coaching men’s and women’s college rugby,” Stewart said. “I observed that when my teams were successful, there was a sense of good humor to them that was denoted by laughter before, during, and after practice and games. In other words, there was a sense of playfulness that brought the respective teams together and led them to trust each other more and play even harder for each other.”The researchers analyzed responses from the studio audience during the first general election debate between Trump and Clinton on September 26, 2016 at Hofstra University.A group of 362 undergraduate students also watched the debate and evaluated the candidates’ performance. In addition, 14 Republicans, 11 Independents, and 9 Democrats from West Texas watched the debate and provided moment-to-moment assessments of each candidates’ likability. Trump and Clinton both elicited four applause/cheering events from the studio audience. Applause for Clinton resulted in higher likability ratings among Democrats and Independents, but lower likability ratings among Republicans. Applause for Trump, on the other hand, didn’t show a partisan bias. Trump also elicited significantly more laughter than Clinton, provoking 14 laughter events compared to Clinton’s seven. “Observable audience response matters in a variety of ways,” Stewart told PsyPost. “First, it bonds us together. Humans are social creatures that survive and thrive best (if at all) in groups. Laughter, applause/cheering, booing, and chanting provide reliable signals of followership (in response to the person making a comment), social connection (through the mimicry and/or contagiousness of the observable audience response), and social values (through what is being responded to and how).”“Second, what people are responding to tells us not only about what they value, but also the leader’s connection with them. Trump appeared to have a stronger connection with the studio audience – and importantly those watching on television and other media – during the first debate than did Clinton based upon the strength of the observable audience responses of laughter and applause-cheering. Furthermore, the type of comments used by both candidates, that entailed mostly ridicule and attacks of some kind, provided a real-time reflection of how polarized the 2016 campaign was.”“Third, we have known for a long time that ‘canned laughter’ can make even mediocre situation comedies appear humorous; the research we carried out suggests that other forms of observable audience response can affect viewers watching major political events such as debates. In other words, the intra-media effects extend beyond just laughter to potentially include applause, cheering, booing, and chanting.”But the research includes some caveats.“As this is an observational study carried out in ‘real-time’ there are any number of potential confounds that might have influenced our findings,” Stewart explained. “We also had one aspect of our study rendered invalid by a ceiling effect — we only anticipated there being at most ten humorous comments and the first 2016 general election presidential debate was much more raucous than any in modern history (twenty-one laughter and thirty-four observable audience responses in total).” “However, the trade-off of experimental controls (and internal validity) for the external validity of such an important event strengthens the inferences, and more importantly, the future research questions that may be drawn.”Stewart is also running experiments on how audience laughter influences the evaluation of leadership qualities such as competence, trustworthiness, and charisma. He is also “developing a cross-cultural observable audience response study that takes into account not just laughter, but also applause and booing, in how individuals respond to politicians.”Responses from the audience can provide important information to public figures.“The observable audience responses of laughter, applause-cheering, booing, and chanting all may be considered primal ‘votes’ that provided members of comparatively large groups we evolved to take part in with the ability to provide useful feedback to leaders,” Stewart explained. “In other words, the leaders were able to follow the followers’ preferences based upon the positivity-negativity (laughter and applause-cheering vs. booing) and intensity of their vocalizations.” “Our current political environment not only provides a mismatch through mediated politics in which fewer followers have direct contact with politicians, instead watching them on television and other media, but also serves to insulate the leaders from dissenting viewpoints when politicians communicate predominantly via social media. While social media has much greater reach, it not only tends to reinforce in-group vs. out-group differences, the response choices have a distinct positivity bias, with ‘likes’ being the default response and dissent being easily ignored.”The study, “Candidate Performance and Observable Audience Response: Laughter and Applause–Cheering During the First 2016 Clinton–Trump Presidential Debate“, was authored by Patrick A. Stewart, Austin D. Eubanks, Reagan G. Dye, Zijian H. Gong, Erik P. Bucy, Robert H. Wicks and Scott Eidelman. LinkedIn Sharecenter_img New research published in Frontiers in Psychology suggests that Donald Trump was more effective than Hillary Clinton in connecting with the studio audience during their first debate.“This builds on a long-term research that I started with my book ‘Debatable Humor‘ – there I found that John McCain, Mike Huckabee, Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton were the most humorous candidates (based upon laughter and taking speaking time into account) during the primary campaigns,” said Patrick A. Stewart, an associate professor at the University of Arkansas and corresponding author of the study.“During the 2012 election, I presented some of my findings to an auditorium of University of Arkansas, Fayetteville students and noticed the contagiousness of laughter when students responded to Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, as well as (apparently) the studio audience at the debates.” Email Pinterestlast_img read more

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Take five … things to do in November

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Engineering company chooses Systech

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Open the cage

first_imgLast week’s front page: ‘Solicitors face road traffic fees cut’, ‘Final nail in the coffin of legal aid firms’, ‘Compensation fund levy could hit £875 in 2010’ (see [2009] Gazette, 11 June, 1). Open the cage and let me in! Peter Gildener, Gildener Brett, Penzancelast_img

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My Digital Life … Kathryn Findlay

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Monitoring wheel surface defects ensures a quieter ride

first_imgINTRO: Use of automatic wheel monitoring on DSB’s S-bane network in København has reduced wheelset damage through the prompt detection of surface defects. Rolling stock maintenance costs have fallen, as well as the levels of noise and vibration generated by train operationsBYLINE: Ulrik Danneskiold-Samsøe and Ove Ramkow-PedersenØDS-Caltronic A/SIN JANUARY 2000, Danish State Railways put into service a new wheel defect detector at Østerport on the København S-bane network. DSB has been continuously monitoring wheel defects on its S-bane EMU fleet since 1986, and the new detector incorporates a number of improvements based on experience with earlier systems. The location on the principal cross-city route close to København’s main station ensures that the equipment will monitor the majority of units, as most services are funnelled through this area with 2min headways at peak hours. Before the introduction of automatic monitoring the S-bane fleet suffered heavily from wheel flats. At that time the underfloor wheel lathe at the S-bane depot was working three shifts a day. Its replacement now works less than one shift a day, significantly reducing maintenance costs.Causes of wheelflatsClimatic conditions in København unfortunately stimulate the creation of flats. The humid environment and rich vegetation cause a reduction in the adhesion coefficient, which in turn increases the likelihood of wheelslip particularly during the leaf fall season. Slipping causes spot heating of the contact area on the wheel, and when it has ceased the perlitic alloy is quenched and converted to more brittle martensite. Surface deformation also takes place, and cracks are formed in the contact area between the small layer of martensite and the surrounding perlitic steel.As the wheel moves, the martensite layer delivers a strong impact to the rail causing a rounding of the geometry and crack growth. This impact will therefore be at its largest just after the flat has been created, with the peak impact value eventually starting to fall to a certain level after the rounding process has stabilised. When the cracks have grown sufficiently large, small pieces of the contact surface may begin to work loose, and the overall impact level may start to increase again. The wheel monitoring system detects this trend or defect pattern by analysing the energy impact level to determine how recently the defect was caused.One means of tackling this problem at its source is to implement measures that will prevent train wheels from slipping. In order to maintain adhesion on the S-bane network during the leaf fall season, the railhead is cleaned outside traffic hours using a high pressure flush of water mixed with lime. This technique has been in use for at least four years, and has caused a significant reduction in the number of wheelflats. Other measures include ensuring that brake blocks are released from the wheels after parking in very cold weather, and avoiding emergency brake applications as much as possible through the use of better signalling systems.Fitting modern wheelslide prevention systems to rolling stock forms another possible solution. But despite investment in preventive measures, flats are often still generated. Once wheelflats do appear, however, wheel monitoring systems have proven to be successful in limiting their impact.The physical impact generated by a wheelflat on the railhead is proportional to the speed of the train. In order to obtain comparable data, it is therefore necessary to install the wheelflat detector in a section of track where trains operate at a fairly constant speed. Tests performed at the Transportation Technology Center in Pueblo, USA, and experience in general have show that a passing speed in the range of 60 to 80 km/h is a practical choice, but reliable measurements can also be obtained above and below these speeds.Efficient detectionFlats usually form on the wheel tread, and this is most pronounced on railways with mainly tangent track and precise wheel/rail profiles. Curved track will increase the likelihood of flats occurring close to the flange or the wheel edge, and worn profiles will increase the likelihood of hunting. Detection accuracy declines as the degree of hunting or the percentage of flats forming outside the wheel tread increases.The detection system can be configured so as to allow the bogie to move at least one half-wavelength of the hunting movement for a normal two-axle bogie while passing the detector. This increases the chance of getting at least one ’direct hit’ of the flat as the train passes the detector site. In specifying the new detector for Østerport, this feature was highlighted by DSB. The length of the measuring section was increased to cover at least four full wheel rotations, whereas the old detector was only long enough to cover one wheel rotation.Another important requirement was the need to detect wheelflats at an early stage, while the rounding effect is still at its peak. The new equipment has therefore been installed on the busiest section of the S-bane network, where most trains pass and new flats can be detected at the earliest possible stage.A feature retained from the old system has been smooth data distribution through a local area network to all departments that may find the detection results useful. Wheel data is currently received by DSB’s maintenance planning and engineering functions, and may in future be transmitted to the S-bane wheel shop, maintenance department and infrastructure owner Banestyrelsen.Benefits to dateDSB’s main reason for installing a monitoring system has been to reduce wheel maintenance costs, which for its second and third-generation S-bane EMUs is principally a matter of achieving the best whole-life cost. The fourth generation – the innovative wide-bodied articulated sets built by Alstom-LHB (RG 1.96 p19) – impose a further demand. Wheel diameters must be maintained within very close tolerances on each half-set of these trains, which each have four out of five single-axle bogies powered by inverter-fed AC traction motors. A single wheelset can only be reprofiled within very narrow tolerances if reprofiling of the other four is to be avoided, which increases the importance of detecting surface defects at an early stage. The wheelflat detection system is therefore of vital importance to the economic operation of these latest EMUs, even though they are equipped with a better wheelslide prevention system than their predecessors.The wheelflat detection system also allows better maintenance planning and can therefore improve fleet availability. Fitted with AVI tags, EMUs can be called in for scheduled maintenance rather than being sent for attention when a defect is discovered, which can lead to a sudden influx of vehicles requiring attention. Manual tread inspection has been superseded by the continuously-operating system, reducing costs and helping to prevent damage to bogie-mounted components.Due to København’s coastal climate where the differences between night and daytime and summer and winter temperatures are not great, wheel tread defects rarely cause track damage on the S-bane network. In other countries, however, wheel defects have been known to cause cracking of rail and sleepers and even rail breaks.Levels of noise and vibration inside the cars and at the lineside have been reduced, and wheel defect monitoring can thus form part of strategies to reduce the environmental impact of railway operations. Reducing levels of wheel/rail noise through wheel monitoring has enabled DSB to do without costly lineside noise barriers, but precise figures for these notional savings are not available.Protecting assetsThe ongoing trend to divide national railways into separate companies responsible for infrastructure and operations has seen those bodies responsible for the permanent way develop an increased awareness of the damage caused to track, signalling and other lineside equipment by defective wheels. In some countries, infrastructure authorities are considering the installation of wheel condition monitoring systems, in order to monitor standards of rolling stock maintenance by operators who might be incentivised by a system of penalties and rewards.The obvious interest to train operators of reducing maintenance costs has already been mentioned, but some are also concerned about the environmental impact of defective wheel treads, particularly the noise levels generated by freight and high speed trains. On these environmental grounds, many countries enforce severe restrictions on ’noisy’ operations such as freight, and continuous wheel condition monitoring helps operators to stay within the limits prescribed by local regulations.Operators, infrastructure authorities and environmental protection agencies therefore have an obvious common interest in investing in wheel condition monitoring technology. It would be to their advantage to share the costs and mutual benefits of detecting and promptly rectifying wheel defects before they become a problem.CAPTION: DSB’s wheelflat detector at Østerport on the cross-city S-bane corridor has been made long enough to monitor four complete rotations of each wheel CAPTION: Surface deformations and martensite are formed on the tread by spot heating of the contact area as a result of wheelslip CAPTION: The three-phase drives and steerable single-axle bogies used on the latest generation of S-bane EMUs require wheel diameters to be maintained to very close tolerancesØDS-Caltronic A/S, DenmarkReader Enquiry Number 128last_img read more

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Nigerian troops launch massive military offensive against Boko Haram: Army spokesperson

first_imgNigerian army frees 400 Boko Haram hostages Nigerian troops are already fighting the Boko Haram jihadist insurgency in the northeastern part of the country and were deployed last year to the southern Niger Delta region, and the southeast, to ward off oil vandalism and decrease the influence of secessionists. Image courtesy: Nigerian ArmyNigerian troops have launched a massive military offensive to end insurgency in the northeast region of the West African country, an army spokesperson said.Aminu Iliyasu, coordinating spokesperson for the Nigerian army, who disclosed this in a statement sent to Xinhua on Saturday, said troops had continued to hunt for fleeing Boko Haram insurgents and increased onslaught against them in Borno and other parts of the northeast.Iliyasu said the troops had recovered weapons and vehicles belonging to the fleeing Boko Haram criminals.He added that the troops deployed at Gubio in Borno successfully repelled a Boko Haram attack on their location and neutralized one of the terrorists.According to the spokesperson, army operations in other parts of the country had resulted in a number of arrests and recoveries of weapons in recent time.Nigeria grapples with security challenges, part of which is the insurgency of Boko Haram, which has killed thousands of people, including women and children, since 2009.Related Boko Haram: Nigerian Army Atrocities Uncovered center_img Nigerian troops capture Boko Haram commanderlast_img read more

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USD 376,000 in Port Sponsorships Awarded to Community Groups

first_imgRequests for sponsorship funding are open twice each year, in March and September. For the 2020 fiscal year that began Oct. 1, the board approved a $1 million budget for the program. “Long Beach has an abundance of wonderful organizations that produce impressive events and programs. We’re honored to be able to support them through our sponsorship program,” said Long Beach Harbor Commission President Bonnie Lowenthal. “It’s a way for us to strengthen our commitment to the community while bringing awareness to the Port’s important role in the region.” Since 2007, the Port of Long Beach has given more than $9 million to the community through its sponsorship program, supporting community groups’ events and projects that make Long Beach a better place to live and work, while also helping the Port communicate about its projects and programs with local residents and other audiences. The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners this week awarded 124 sponsorships totaling $376,000 to promote local groups advancing causes such as the arts, environment, social justice and historic preservation. Port staff members attend select sponsored events to provide information about the Port. As part of a sponsorship agreement, recipients also give the Port promotional opportunities at events to spread awareness about its mission.center_img Sea News, November 18 Events sponsored for this call include the Cambodia Town Culture Parade and Festival, the Shared Science 2020 Tech Girls Workshop, Long Beach Homeless Coalition’s LB Homelessness Ally Program and the Community Action Team’s 30‐Minute Beach Cleanups. Author: Baibhav Mishralast_img read more

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CMIT Solutions expands engagement with nonprofit veteran

first_img Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Emily Karlichek (contributed)With the hiring of Senior Vice President Emily Karlichek, CMIT Solutions of Greater Oakland County will increase community engagement and philanthropic efforts through strategic business growth and enhanced relationship building.“I am thrilled to have Emily join the team,” Stuart Feravich, company president, said in a press release. “Her passion for people, community outreach and businesses is dynamic, engaging and genuine, a rare combination that makes people comfortable and ready to get involved.”Karlichek, a veteran of the nonprofit world, has held leadership and development positions with international and local charities. CMIT’s current support endeavors include the Detroit Institute for Technology at Cody High School, where Feravich chairs the Pathway Advisory Board and supports career development and fundraising efforts for the students.CMIT also supports Community Living Centers, a 50-year-old Farmington-based nonprofit that provides loving homes and independent living supports to adults with developmental disabilities, through event sponsorship, volunteering and collaboration.Additionally, the company is highly involved in the Troy Chamber of Commerce and Greater Farmington Area Chamber of Commerce.Learn more about the company at cmitsolutions.com/greater-oakland-county/. Reported bylast_img read more

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