New Musical Flying Over Sunset Begins World Premiere Run on Broadway

first_img Flying Over Sunset View All (6) Related Shows Jeremy Kushnier Robert Sella The new musical Flying Over Sunset, starring Carmen Cusack, Tony Yazbeck and Harry Hadden-Paton, begins previews on March 12 at Lincoln Center Theater’s Vivian Beaumont Theater. The world premiere production will officially open on April 16.Written and directed by James Lapine, with music by Tom Kitt and lyrics by Michael Korie, Flying Over Sunset is a work of fiction inspired by the lives of three real-life people—playwright, diplomat and congresswoman Clare Boothe Luce (Cusack), film legend Cary Grant (Yazbeck) and writer Aldous Huxley (Hadden-Paton)—each of whom in experimented with the drug LSD. At a crossroads in their lives the three come together, and under the influence of the drug, take a trip and confront the mysteries of their lives and their world.Rounding out the musical’s cast are Erika Henningsen, Jeremy Kushnier, Emily Pynenburg, Michele Ragusa, Robert Sella, Laura Shoop and Atticus Ware.Flying Over Sunset features music direction by Kimberly Grigsby and choreography by Michelle Dorrance, with scenic design by Beowulf Boritt, costume design by Toni-Leslie James, lighting design by Bradley King, sound design by Dan Moses Schreier, projection design by 59 Productions and orchestrations by Michael Starobin.The production is scheduled to play a limited engagement through June 28. Star Files Carmen Cusackcenter_img from $97.00 Erika Henningsen Harry Hadden-Paton Harry Hadden-Paton, Carmen Cusack & Tony Yazbeck(Photo: Joan Marcus) Tony Yazbeck View Commentslast_img read more

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Foreclosure defense training set for February 11 in Ft. Lauderdale

first_img February 15, 2011 Regular News F oreclosure defense training set for February 11 in Ft. Lauderdale A free foreclosure defense and consumer rights training for Florida Bar members will be held February 11 in Ft. Lauderdale, presented by Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, Inc. < p>Featuring James Kowalski and Lynn Drysdale, the full-day workshop from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., will include: < p>* Federal and state laws that govern mortgage origination; < p>* Understanding loan documents, origination and closing process; < p>* Serving problems and post-origination issues; < p>* Common law/state law causes of action and affirmative defenses; < p>* Drafting discovery/motion practice; < p>* Ethical discussions/considerations in foreclosure practice. < p>Attendees are required to take a pro bono case from their local legal aid organization. Seven (including one ethics) Florida Bar CLE credit hours have been approved.= < p>The location of the workshop is Hilton Garden Inn, 180 SW 18th Avenue, Dania Beach. To register go to http://surveygoldplus.com/s/1EFA9028AE084603/28.htm. < p>For more information, call Atheia Inman at (904) 356-8371, X377. Foreclosure defense training set for February 11 in Ft. Lauderdalelast_img read more

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Certain leisure activities may reduce post-surgical delirium among older adults

first_imgDelirium, or the medical term for experiencing sudden confusion, is upsetting for both older adults and their families. In fact, it is one of the most common complications older adults face after surgery (a time often referred to as the “post-operative” period). Researchers believe that older adults who have higher levels of “cognitive reserve” may have a better chance for reducing their chances of developing dementia–which theoretically could reduce the risks for developing delirium.One way to understand cognitive reserve is to think of your brain as a muscle. When you exercise a muscle, you strengthen it. Activities such as reading, playing computer games, singing, emailing and even knitting may act as “exercise” for your brain, “strengthening” it in a way that could help prevent dementia and delirium. A group of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, NY, examined whether certain leisure activities known to reduce dementia risks could also reduce the risk of post-surgical delirium. They published their findings in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.The researchers examined a group of 142 older adults who were scheduled for elective knee, hip, or spinal surgery. They determined whether or not the people participated in leisure activities such as reading books or newspapers, knitting, emailing, playing cards or other games, working on crossword puzzles, or joining in group meetings. Share on Facebook LinkedIn Email Sharecenter_img Pinterest Of those involved in the study, 32 percent developed post-operative delirium. Those who were diagnosed with delirium had participated in fewer leisure activities before surgery compared with people who didn’t experience delirium.Out of all the activities, reading books, using email, and playing computer games reduced the risk of delirium. Playing computer games and singing were the only two activities that predicted lower severity of delirium.The researchers reported that each additional day of participation in a leisure activity reduced post-operative delirium by 8 percent. According to the researchers, maintaining leisure activities later in life could be an important way to lessen the chances of developing delirium following surgery. This is important, since delirium increases an older adult’s risk for functional decline, dementia, and even mortality. What’s more, people with severe post-operative delirium are at greater risk for being institutionalized and for dying. Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Serna Releases Position Statement On Climate Change

first_imgMarco SernaFrom the Marco Serna for Congress Campaign:Española – Third Congressional District candidate Marco Serna has made public his position paper on Climate Change.While highlighting that climate change was very real and a threat to our survival, he rejects the “Green New Deal” proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and three of his opponents in the 2020 Democratic Primary.“I join with the National AFL-CIO in opposing the Green New Deal. If the 10-year plan was implemented, it would have a devastating effect on New Mexico’s economy and the state budget,” Serna said. “It has the potential of ruining our cattle and dairy industry and bankrupting many small businesses. Even more compelling is the fact that it would eliminate the $934 million of gas and oil revenue that pays for our education system. Before I support any proposal, I have to be assured that the best interests of New Mexicans are protected. As written, The Green New Deal is a disaster to New Mexico.”Serna stated that he supported the New Mexico Transaction Act passed by the legislature and signed into law by Gov. Lujan Grisham in 2019.Dubbed the “Mini Green New Deal,” Serna said, “This is the type of change that makes sense for New Mexico. By setting a goal of 100 percent carbon-free by 2045, we do our part in terms of climate change while protecting our economy and education system.”The national  “Green New Deal”  has a 10-year implementation period without providing any details about how oil and cattle producing states will be compensated. If enacted as written, it would devastate our economy and education system.Serna stated that he was in favor of many environmental initiatives, including:  Rejoining the Paris Climate Change Accord;Funding of research for carbon capture and storage plants;Investing in solar, wind, nuclear and renewable energy;Encouraging reforestation and better forest practices;Help fund a geothermal energy program in New Mexico;Supports gradual moving away from fossil fuels; andOpposes fracking.“I am sure that many of my friends in the environmental movement will be upset with my decision to oppose the ‘Green New Deal’,” Serna said in closing. “To me it’s simple, without more details and assurances of mitigation costs, I refuse to support any proposal that will devastate New Mexico’s economy and education system.”last_img read more

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Sheavills retires as head of property at RBS

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UK inflation jumps to 3.3%

first_imgIt is thought Mervyn King, the Governor of the Bank of England, has warned that inflation could rise to above 4% in a letter sent to Alistair Darling, the Chancellor of the Exchequer this week.Increases in the cost of food, oil and household bills are all driving inflation upwards. The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) annual inflation – the Government’s target measure of inflation – was up from 3% in April to 3.3% in May.The largest upward pressure came from food and non-alcoholic beverages. There were further large upward pressures from housing and household services due to gas and electricity bills and heating oil prices.The oil price rose to just shy of $140 in early June. Import prices are under pressure due to sterling’s 12% trade-weighted decline since last summer while manufacturer input prices are rising at their fastest pace since 1976. The news is also a blow to the property industry.Neil Prime, head of office agency at Jones Lang LaSalle, said: ‘Slower growth is likely to be reflected in reduced occupier demand for commercial premises and we expect UK commercial property rents to show declines in both 2008 and 2009. At this stage we are not expecting rents to reduce to the extent seen in either the early 1990s or 2000s.’Julian Stocks, head of capital markets at Jones Lang Lasalle, said: ‘At the same time UK interest rate expectations have shifted dramatically since the end of May. Higher expectations for short rates and a sharp rise in inflation expectations have fed through to the five year swap rate, which rose from 5.8% at the end of May to 6.2% by mid-June. ‘This will put further upward pressure on property yields as financing costs rise – indeed we have seen a further movement in yields in the last six weeks.’last_img read more

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Argon to preserve mysterious map

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Picture of the day: Gazprom-chartered Lena River in Magellan Strait

first_imgLena River in the Magellan Strait (Image courtesy of Gazprom Export)Russian gas giant Gazprom said that the Lena River, one of six vessels in its LNG fleet, has recently completed a journey through the Magellan Strait, marking the first time a Gazprom LNG tanker has travelled this route.The 155,000-cbm tanker left Bonny, Nigeria on 6 April, transiting the Magellan Strait on 20 April, before arriving in Manzanillo, Mexico for discharge 26 days later, Gazprom Export said in its May newsletter.The tanker was bought in December by Monaco-based Dynagas LNG Partners from Greece’s Dynagas Holding. The 2013-built LNG carrier is currently operating on a five-year charter with  Gazprom Global LNG, a wholly owned subsidiary of Gazprom, that ends on October 2018.After Portuguese maritime explorer Ferdinand Magellan first traversed the channel at the Southern tip of South America in a successful attempt to find a passage from the Atlantic to Pacific Ocean in the 16th century, the Magellan Strait became an important waterway for sailing ships, especially before the completion of the Panama Canal in 1914, Gazprom Export said.“Narrow, complicated and stormy, this challenging passage was one of two practical maritime routes between the Atlantic and Pacific. Today, it remains a common but considerably safer passage for those ships rounding South America that too large to transit the Panama Canal before its expansion is completed in July 2016,” it added.last_img read more

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Fee deterrent sends employment claims plummeting

first_imgEmployment tribunal claims plummeted in the last quarter of 2013, reflecting the impact of the introduction of tribunal fees in July, figures published today reveal.The number of claims fell 79% in the final quarter of last year to 9,801 compared with the same period in 2012, and dropped 75% on the third quarter of 2013.In July the government introduced fees of £160 to issue a claim, rising to £250 depending on the type of claim, with further hearing fees of between £230 and £950.Richard Fox, head of employment law at London firm Kingsley Napley and chair of the Employment Lawyers Association, said: ‘It is now clear that many employees have been deterred from bringing tribunal claims since fees were introduced last year.‘If employees no longer feel able to defend their interests via tribunal proceedings, they may look to do so in other ways – such as by turning to trade unions to fight their corner.’Last month the High Court dismissed trade union Unison’s legal challenge to the introduction of tribunal fees.Giving judgment in Unison v Lord Chancellor Lord Justice Moses (pictured) and Mr Justice Irwin described the union’s argument as ‘premature’ and said that ‘the evidence at this stage lacks that robustness necessary to overturn the regime’.Unison said it intends to take the case to the Court of Appeal to consider its arguments further, in particular its claim that the fees will have a disproportionate impact on women.Dave Prentis, the union’s general secretary, said the new figures were ‘shocking’. He said ‘the disastrous effect of tribunal fees is now blatantly obvious. The introduction of fees was unfair and they should be dropped. Money should never be a barrier to justice, so it is deeply disturbing that this is exactly what is happening for thousands of workers since the fees were introduced.’last_img read more

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Siemens railway test site equipped for Galileo trials

first_imgGERMANY: Eight ‘pseudolite’ signal generators which are being installed at Siemens Mobility’s Wegberg-Wildenrath railway test centre will allow practical trials of railway applications of the Galileo satellite navigation system before the real signals are available in 2013. Signal generators on 50 m masts will provide a Galileo signal across the 35 ha site. This will enable testing of applications such as train tracking and automatic shunting to be carried out in a secure environment with 28 km of track, including a depot and forested areas. Satellite location has often been proposed as a basis for automatic train protection, but according to Siemens the high degree of reliability required cannot be met using current systems such as GPS, which lack integrity information and an operating guarantee. Galileo is intended to change this. Wegberg-Wildenrath is one of two ground transport Galileo test sites being developed under the GALILEOabove project. The installation is part of the RailGATE project, being undertaken by RWTH Aachen University with funding from Germany’s Ministry of Economics & Technology. Germany’s Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier attended the launch of work to develop the DB Eco Rail Center at Kirchmöser in Brandenburg on August 10. DB Chief Executive Dr Rüdiger Grube said the long-term goal of the research facility is to offer ‘emission free’ vehicles on non-electrified lines. The partners are Alstom, Bombardier, German aerospace centre DLR, Enertrag, Fachhochschule Brandenburg, Linde, Siemens, Solon, Tognum, VDEI and Voith Turbo.last_img read more

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