DIY Spoke Animation Videos On the Cheap

first_imgAdafruit Industries has brought wheel motion animation to the lay people with SpokePOV DIY kits ranging from $37.50 to $99.00.  That’s a hair better than the $2000 system from Monkeylectric we showed you, although the animation potential may be somewhat limited, and the kits only do one color per setup (but the real creatives out there could probably make some good stuff with multiple kits).They claim full image coverage is possible with one kit when rolling at 15mph.  If you wanna slow your roll and impress the hipsters, get two or three kits and roll as slow as 7mph.The kit works on Mac, PC or Linux and plugs in via Serial cable or USB (extra connector required, still cheap), and it runs on 2-3 AA batteries for 10+ hours.  Each kit uses 30 LEDs per side and is available in Blue, Yellow, Red or Green.Hit ‘more’ for a few large pics… Click either pic to enlarge.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Cats National Tour Breaks Show’s Worldwide Box Office Record During Weeklong Run in Atlanta

first_imgA scene from the national tour of “Cats” (Photo: Matthew Murphy) The Jellicle cats will definitely be celebrating tonight! The North American tour of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats broke the show’s worldwide box office record during the production’s engagement at The Fox Theatre in Atlanta from August 6-11. Cats brought in $1,964,933.50 and played to 34,740 audience members over eight performances, which was part of the Broadway in Atlanta series.The box office record was previously held by the Broadway revival, which brought in a then record-breaking $1,826,206 over nine performances in December 2017.The cast of the Cats tour includes Keri René Fuller (Waitress) as Grizabella and McGee Maddox (An American in Paris) as Rum Tum Tugger along with Phillip Deceus as Alonzo, Lexie Plath as Bombalurina, Mariah Reives as Cassandra, PJ DiGaetano as Coricopat, Liz Schmitz as Demeter, Kaitlyn Davidson as Jellylorum, Emily Jeanne Phillips as Jennyanydots, Tion Gaston as Mistoffelees, Tony d’Alelio as Mungojerrie, Dan Hoy as Munkustrap, Timothy Gulan as Peter/Bustopher Jones/Asparagus, Tyler John Logan as Plato/Macavity, Anthony Michael Zas as Pouncival, Rose Iannaccone as Rumpelteazer, Ahren Victory as Sillabub, Ethan Saviet as Skimbleshanks, Halli Toland as Tantomile, Devin Neilson as Tumblebrutus, Brandon Michael Nase as Victor/Old Deuteronomy and Caitlin Bond as Victoria.Based on T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, the musical tells the story of the Jellicle cats and each cat’s individual quest to be selected as the lucky one who will ascend to “the Heaviside Layer.” The musical debuted on Broadway in 1982, closing in 2000 after a record-breaking run at the Winter Garden Theatre. The 2016 Broadway revival played the Neil Simon Theatre.The Cats tour features original scenic and costume design by John Napier, all-new lighting design by Natasha Katz, all-new sound design by Mick Potter and new choreography by Andy Blankenbuehler—based on the original choreography by Gillian Lynne. View Commentslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Jamel Harbison transferring to Mars Hill College

first_imgHarbison grew up in Charlotte, N.C., and played sparingly on offense for Minnesota this season. Fellow freshmen Drew Wolitarsky and Donovahn Jones received more playing time as the year progressed.Harbison made his collegiate debut at UNLV in 2012, but tore his ACL in that game. He received a medical redshirt. Jamel Harbison transferring to Mars Hill College Jack SatzingerJanuary 16, 2014Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintOn Wednesday night, Gophers receiver Jamel Harbison announced via Twitter that he is transferring from the University of Minnesota to Mars Hill College in North Carolina.”Football is life transfer from Minnesota to Mars Hill,” Harbison wrote on his Twitter profile @Jamel_duce. The redshirt freshman played in nine games in 2013, but did not record any receptions. Most of Harbison’s field action was on special teams. last_img read more

Continue Reading

Falcon Field named Best Renovation Project in the Southwest (Photos)

first_imgThe City of Mesa Falcon Field Airport Terminal Upgrades project has been selected as the Best Project in the Renovation/Restoration category for the 2016 Engineering News-Record (ENR) Regional Best Projects awards competition for the Southwest region.Falcon Field Terminal Airside before renovations. (Photo courtesy of DWL Architects + Planners)The annual awards program is dedicated to honoring the best construction projects and companies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico with the Southwest region consisting of Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada. Among the 20 categories, ranging from airports to sports and entertainment venues, each project is judged using five criteria: safety; overcoming challenges and teamwork; innovation and contribution to the industry; construction quality and craftsmanship; and functionality of design and aesthetic quality.Falcon Field opened in September 1941 as a military airport to train British Royal Air Force and U.S. Army Air Corps pilots. Today it is among the top 10 most active general aviation airports in the United States, serving corporate, military, public safety, recreational and instructional aviation uses.Falcon Field Terminal Airside after renovations (Photo by Kyle Zirkus Photography)“The design took to heart the overarching goal for this project: to send a strong message that this airport is at the center of Mesa’s aerospace and high-tech industry. The new terminal is contemporary both inside and out, but elements of the design evoke memories of the airport’s past as a World War II pilot training base,” said Sandra Kukla of DWL Architects + Planners, Principal in Charge for the project.The multi-tiered patio with unique canopy to provide shade and an identifiable landmark. (Photo by Kyle Zirkus Photography)The renovation resulted in a $1.8 million comprehensive remodel and expanded the terminal from 3,560 square feet to 4,734 square feet. The new terminal includes enhanced public waiting and pilot briefing space, a meeting room, upgraded restrooms, new airside and landside patios and public aircraft viewing areas as well as other interior improvements and an upgraded arrival experience.“Falcon Field is a regional hub for aviation business and recreational activity, and these improvements not only reflect the continuous improvements that we make to the airport’s infrastructure, but also will help us remain competitive in our efforts to attract businesses and continue to be financially self-sustaining,” said Corinne Nystrom, Airport Director.One of the new, contemporary lounge spaces inside the new terminal. (Photo by Kyle Zirkus Photography)The City of Mesa Falcon Field Airport Terminal Upgrades project will automatically compete in the Best of the Best Projects 2016, a national juried competition and will be a featured project at the ENR Southwest Best Projects Awards Event on November 10, 2016 at the Renaissance Phoenix Hotel in downtown Phoenix.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Study describes brain circuitry for selecting among sensations

first_imgLinkedIn Share on Facebook Share Pinterest Share on Twittercenter_img “One of the purported functions of this corticothalamic pathway is to focus attention on certain kinds of sensory stimuli at the expense of others,” said corresponding author Barry Connors, chair of neuroscience at Brown.The researchers isolated the key circuits in mice (people have the same basic circuitry) and actively manipulated them to observe their physiology at work. What they learned is that the cortical neurons control the activity of the connected thalamic neurons by varying the frequency of their signals.“When the cortex is ‘off’ there is a certain amount of thalamic input coming in in,” said co-author Scott Cruikshank, assistant professor (research) of neuroscience. “When the cortex turns ‘on’ a little bit, it actually suppresses that. When it turns on at a higher frequency, it enhances relative to being off. It can modify thalamic throughput in either direction.”Illuminating the brainTo conduct the research, Connors, Cruikshank, and lead author Shane Crandall, a postdoctoral research fellow in neuroscience, focused on the circuits running between the neocortex and the thalamus that process sensory information from the mouse’s whiskers. The mice in the study were genetically engineered such that the cells in the cortex that project neurons into the thalamus could be controlled — turned on an off — by flashes of visible light, a technique called “optogenetics.”In a lab preparation they stripped down the neural tissue to better highlight the circuit. Then they electrically stimulated the cells in the thalamus to act as if they were reporting sensory information. With those neurons activated, they used the light flashes to operate the cortical neurons at different frequencies. Their goal was to see whether and how the cortical cell activity would affect the thalamic cell activity.That’s how they found that when the cortical cells fire at low frequencies (less than a spike per second), they inhibit the thalamic cells. The cortical cells essentially hush their thalamic underlings. But when the scientists made the cortical neurons fire away faster — 10 times a second — then the thalamic targets increased their activity, becoming stimulated by those signals.That result was not what conventional wisdom predicted, Crandall said. Many neuroscientists figured the cortex throttled the thalamus more simply. If the cortical neuron sent a signal to the thalamic neuron, they presumed, it would increase the activity of that circuit and suppress the activity of those nearby. But here the results suggest that the cortical signals vary by frequency to either suppress or enhance the thalamic neurons independently.In further experiments the scientists measured how physical properties of the circuits, such as the conductance of the thalamic cells, changed with the different frequencies of cortical activity. They also examined which neurotransmitter receptors on the thalamic neurons were involved (NMDA, AMPA, and GABA). These studies showed that the frequency-dependent switching of thalamic cells between inhibition and excitation was associated with different balances of activity among all three of these receptors.Experiments also showed that neurons called TRN cells were important for inhibiting the thalamic cells, and that their influence disappeared at the higher frequencies of cortical activity.Finally, the researchers showed that by generating brainwaves at the gamma frequency in the cortex, which often occur naturally, they could also stimulate greater activity in the thalamus.When one understands a circuitThe study illustrates at the circuit level how the cortex appears to dynamically modulate the influx of sensory information from individual neurons in the thalamus. With the circuits now well-observed in a lab tissue preparation, team members will continue their studies of corticothalamic communication in behaving rodent models. Can they, for instance, focus the attention of a mouse on a particular whisker by activating the relevant circuit of cortical and thalamic neurons?Connors said that knowing what the circuits’ normal functioning looks like could help neurologists understand how it may differ in certain disorders, such as in schizophrenia.The data will also allow the team to collaborate with colleagues to create a computer model of the corticothalamic circuits, which would allow for further studies using simulations.And finally, Crandall is also onto another important question: What motivates a particular cortical neuron to increase or decrease its activity in order to control its thalamic counterpart? We consider only some of the sights, sounds, and sensations we experience. A new study by Brown University neuroscientists details how the neocortex selectively samples from the flow of sensory information that might otherwise flood it.The usual metaphor for the neocortex is that it is the brain’s chief executive. It’s the region for complex cogitation and decision-making based on raw information gathered by the senses and delivered by its loyal lackey, a region called the thalamus. But the idea of a simple one-way rush of sensory information into the cortex doesn’t explain why cortical neurons project 10 times more tendrilous axons into the thalamus than thalamic neurons send into the cortex.The curiosity that neuroscientists have had about this considerable infrastructure for cortical communication to the thalamus has led to the hypothesis that the cortex somehow controls the throughput of the thalamus. Perhaps the cortex uses these connections to tap streams of particular interest from the rushing floodwaters of incoming information. The new study, published in Neuron, not only adds considerable support to that idea, but also explains in detail how the cortex does it. Emaillast_img read more

Continue Reading

Route awakening

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Continue Reading

New Diocese Head Implicated By Grand Jury

first_imgThe Diocese of Rockville Centre hoped to further distance itself from the pedophile priest scandal that shook the very foundation of the Catholic Church when it hired Bishop John Barres to replace the retiring Bishop William Murphy.Instead, fresh wounds have opened and the church is under the gun again with revelations that Barres, like Murphy, covered up pedophile crimes committed by priests and protected the accused.Though Barres said Wednesday that a Grand Jury report issued in Allentown contained “factual errors” Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro countered that the report is factual.Murphy was a central figure in the Boston church pedophile scandal – the story was told in The Spotlight, which won the Oscar for best Movie in 2016.Newsday reported Murphy, as Cardinal Bernard Law’s top deputy in Boston for almost eight years, was involved in almost one-third of the priest sexual abuse cases at the heart of the scandal there. “Not only did Murphy supervise the assignment of priests, he was privy to all confidential records on accusers’ complaints, treatment and settlements. He also took care of accused priests’ legal bills and helped arrange housing and jobs for them,” Newsday continued.Murphy arrived in Rockville Centre in 2001 and made waves by spending more than $5 million on renovations for St. Agnes Cathedral that included a palatial residence for himself – uprooting six Dominican sisters in the process.Murphy was roundly criticized for being hesitant to confront the pedophile problem, weed out the guilty priests, and reach out to victims after he arrived in Rockville Centre. But in recent years, especially after the movie was released, the diocese has taken positive steps to put the scandal behind. Most notable was the formation of the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program, which allows victims to file for damages and draw from a pool of money contributed by the church. However, laymen conduct the interviews and distribute the funds with no input from the church.The evaluation of the claims and any award of money will be made by Kenneth Feinberg (who oversaw the 911 compensation fund) and Camille Biros. According to the IRCP program rules, the diocese will not have a role in deciding the compensation decisions.Barres on paper seemed the perfect choice to move the Diocese beyond the scandal-plagued years. Barres, 57 was born in Larchmont and educated at Princeton, NYU and Catholic University. He served in Allentown for almost 10 years.But the bombshell report, issued last week, details extensive sexual abuse and cover-ups in Pennsylvania including, Allentown, during Barres’ tenure there. Although he was not accused of molesting any children, the grand jury report alleges he covered up the molestation of two boys, aged 12 and 13, by the same priest, Rev. Michael S. Lawrence.Lawrence, according to the report, acknowledged he abused a 12 year-old boy in 1982 yet was allowed to continue working with children for more than two decades.The report, based on an 18-month investigation, determined that more than 300 priests across Pennsylvania sexually abused at least 1,000 children over seven decades.Barres recommended to the Vatican in 2014 that Lawrence remain in retired status and not be removed from the priesthood, despite a second allegation of sexually abusing a boy, according to the grand jury report. That meant the disgraced priest would remain under the church umbrella and be provided with a residence, meals, health care, and be given a monthly cash stipend for the rest of his lifeBarres is contacting Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro to correct the errors, diocesan spokesman Sean Dolan told Newsday. H did not return an email from The Independent by press time.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

Continue Reading

Paradox Resources to start up Lisbon nitrogen plant

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Continue Reading

Trouble in the transfer market: TUPE regulations and frameworks

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Continue Reading

CMA CGM handles autoclave in Bilbao

first_imgThe unit, which measured 19.9 m x 4.5 m x 5 m, was loaded on to a roll-trailer for transportation to Zeebrugge in Belgium. In Belgium, the autoclave was transferred on to the vessel CMA CGM Benjamin Franklin, operating on the French Asia Line 1 (FAL 1) service to Malaysia. www.uniportbilbao.es www.bilbaoport.eus www.cma-cgm.comlast_img

Continue Reading