Route awakening

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New Diocese Head Implicated By Grand Jury

first_imgThe Diocese of Rockville Centre hoped to further distance itself from the pedophile priest scandal that shook the very foundation of the Catholic Church when it hired Bishop John Barres to replace the retiring Bishop William Murphy.Instead, fresh wounds have opened and the church is under the gun again with revelations that Barres, like Murphy, covered up pedophile crimes committed by priests and protected the accused.Though Barres said Wednesday that a Grand Jury report issued in Allentown contained “factual errors” Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro countered that the report is factual.Murphy was a central figure in the Boston church pedophile scandal – the story was told in The Spotlight, which won the Oscar for best Movie in 2016.Newsday reported Murphy, as Cardinal Bernard Law’s top deputy in Boston for almost eight years, was involved in almost one-third of the priest sexual abuse cases at the heart of the scandal there. “Not only did Murphy supervise the assignment of priests, he was privy to all confidential records on accusers’ complaints, treatment and settlements. He also took care of accused priests’ legal bills and helped arrange housing and jobs for them,” Newsday continued.Murphy arrived in Rockville Centre in 2001 and made waves by spending more than $5 million on renovations for St. Agnes Cathedral that included a palatial residence for himself – uprooting six Dominican sisters in the process.Murphy was roundly criticized for being hesitant to confront the pedophile problem, weed out the guilty priests, and reach out to victims after he arrived in Rockville Centre. But in recent years, especially after the movie was released, the diocese has taken positive steps to put the scandal behind. Most notable was the formation of the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program, which allows victims to file for damages and draw from a pool of money contributed by the church. However, laymen conduct the interviews and distribute the funds with no input from the church.The evaluation of the claims and any award of money will be made by Kenneth Feinberg (who oversaw the 911 compensation fund) and Camille Biros. According to the IRCP program rules, the diocese will not have a role in deciding the compensation decisions.Barres on paper seemed the perfect choice to move the Diocese beyond the scandal-plagued years. Barres, 57 was born in Larchmont and educated at Princeton, NYU and Catholic University. He served in Allentown for almost 10 years.But the bombshell report, issued last week, details extensive sexual abuse and cover-ups in Pennsylvania including, Allentown, during Barres’ tenure there. Although he was not accused of molesting any children, the grand jury report alleges he covered up the molestation of two boys, aged 12 and 13, by the same priest, Rev. Michael S. Lawrence.Lawrence, according to the report, acknowledged he abused a 12 year-old boy in 1982 yet was allowed to continue working with children for more than two decades.The report, based on an 18-month investigation, determined that more than 300 priests across Pennsylvania sexually abused at least 1,000 children over seven decades.Barres recommended to the Vatican in 2014 that Lawrence remain in retired status and not be removed from the priesthood, despite a second allegation of sexually abusing a boy, according to the grand jury report. That meant the disgraced priest would remain under the church umbrella and be provided with a residence, meals, health care, and be given a monthly cash stipend for the rest of his lifeBarres is contacting Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro to correct the errors, diocesan spokesman Sean Dolan told Newsday. H did not return an email from The Independent by press time.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Paradox Resources to start up Lisbon nitrogen plant

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Trouble in the transfer market: TUPE regulations and frameworks

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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CMA CGM handles autoclave in Bilbao

first_imgThe unit, which measured 19.9 m x 4.5 m x 5 m, was loaded on to a roll-trailer for transportation to Zeebrugge in Belgium. In Belgium, the autoclave was transferred on to the vessel CMA CGM Benjamin Franklin, operating on the French Asia Line 1 (FAL 1) service to Malaysia. www.uniportbilbao.es www.bilbaoport.eus www.cma-cgm.comlast_img

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LOC appoints Cummins

first_imgCummins, who previously served as the head of engineering at BP, will focus on the oil and gas and renewables markets. He will help LOC identify and develop new engineering opportunities to progress the business.With energy specialists in more than 33 locations worldwide, LOC provides services – including marine warranty surveying – for every stage of an oil and gas project. LOC Renewables is an independent service provider to leading offshore wind developments, wave and tidal energy projects. LOC Renewables covers design, engineering, analysis and warranty of marine operations.www.loc-group.comlast_img read more

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Cost optimisation matches demand and resources

first_imgINTRO: From low-budget lines for low-density cities to intensely-operated networks, the variety of light rail lines around the Pacific Rim demonstrates the great flexibility of the mode. Critical for success has been the ability to tailor each application to the specific operating and financial needs of its communityBYLINE: John Schumann and Tom Larwin*BYLINE: * John Schumann is Senior Planning Engineer at LTK Engineering Services in Portland, Oregon, and Chairman of the Transportation Research Board’s Light Rail Transit Committee. Thomas Larwin is General Manager of San Diego’s principal transit agency, Metropolitan Transit Development Board, and past Chairman of the LRT CommitteeON JULY 26 San Diego celebrated the 19th anniversary of the first modern light rail line in the United States. Its opening in July 1981, together with completion of lines at Edmonton and Calgary in Canada, sparked a renewed interest in light rail that has resulted in the construction of new networks across North America and beyond. In the USA, the number of cities with light rail has jumped from seven in 1980 to 20 now, and several more projects are on the way. Canada and Mexico have each gone from one system to three, and there have been many other new starts around the globe – the Asian side of the Pacific Rim, Turkey and Venezuela. In Europe, new lines in France, Great Britain and now Sweden have joined the continually-improving networks in Germany and its neighbours.The path has been different in each city, as one of light rail’s great strengths is the ability to adapt the technology to local conditions (Table I). However, it is possible to establish a number of common threads in determining what it takes to develop cost-effective light rail projects.The role model Why was San Diego such an influence for other cities? The simple answer is that MTDB built a low-cost and functional system – co-ordinating bus and rail into a seamless mix – that attracted riders without breaking municipal budgets.This was achieved by carefully adhering to four principles for low-cost implementation:last_img read more

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Diana Shipping Announces Time Charter Contract with SwissMarine

first_imgSea News, March 25 This employment is anticipated to generate approximately US$3.84 million of gross revenue for the minimum scheduled period of the time charter. (Image Courtesy: Diana Shipping) Author: Baibhav Mishra Diana Shipping Inc. mpany specializing in the ownership of dry bulk vessels, today announced that, through a separate wholly-owned subsidiary, it has entered into a time charter contract with SwissMarine Pte Ltd., Singapore, for one of its Post-Panamax dry bulk vessels, the m/v Amphitrite.center_img The “Amphitrite” is a 98,697 dwt Post-Panamax dry bulk vessel built in 2012. Diana Shipping Inc.’s fleet currently consists of 41 dry bulk vessels (4 Newcastlemax, 13 Capesize, 5 Post-Panamax, 5 Kamsarmax and 14 Panamax). As of today, the combined carrying capacity of the Company’s fleet is approximately 5.1 million dwt with a weighted average age of 9.52 years. The gross charter rate is US$10,250 per day, minus a 5% commission paid to third parties, for a period of about thirteen (13) months to maximum fifteen (15) months. The charter commenced on March 21, 2020.last_img read more

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EPA sets final daily pollution load limits for Chesapeake Bay watershed

first_imgThe EPA on Dec. 29 issued its pollution controls aimed to restore the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.advertisementadvertisementCalling it a “pollution diet,” EPA established its final total maximum daily load (TMDL).This action identifies the necessary reductions of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment from the watershed to clean the Bay and the region’s streams, creeks and rivers by 2025, with 60 percent to be completed by 2017.The agency said that continued poor water quality, despite 25 years of restoration efforts and federal consent decrees, dating from the late 1990s, prompted the TMDLs. President Obama’s May 12, 2009, executive order regarding this “national treasure” intensified and accelerated EPA’s action.Shawn Garvin, EPA’s Region 3 Administrator, when announcing the TMDLs in a press conference call, said it was a “historic moment,” and added that it’s the most comprehensive water quality roadmap EPA has ever done.advertisementThe Bay TMDL is the largest and most complex, and consists of 92 separate TMDLs. The watershed encompasses 64,000 square miles. It includes the District of Columbia and large sections of Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.The TMDL limits nitrogen to 185.9 million pounds, phosphorus to 12.5 million pounds, and sediment to 6.45 billion pounds per year – a 25 percent reduction in nitrogen, 24 percent reduction in phosphorus and 20 percent reduction in sediment.The TMDL standards include rigorous accountability and enforcement measures. EPA has said it could withhold permitting and federal funding and impose mandatory programs.In evaluating each Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) required of each state, EPA indicated actions it would take if load allocations were not met in the two-year milestones. These were delineated by sector – agriculture, urban stormwater and wastewater.In agriculture, EPA state actions focused on enhanced or ongoing oversight of the animal feeding operations and permit reviews. Enhancing compliance with states’ regulations, and specific actions such as banning winter manure spreading and barnyard runoff control, will be assessed and adjusted.Impact on dairy producersOf the six watershed states, two have dairy herds with more than 500,000 head. The USDA estimates New York’s milk cows at 611,000 head in 2010, and Pennsylvania at 541,000 head.advertisementOnly the south-central portion of New York is in the Bay watershed. Commenting on New York’s WIP, EPA said New York built its WIP on the strength of its Agricultural Environmental Management (AEM) and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) programs.Further, AEM captures 95 percent of dairies in the watershed, and farms must participate in AEM to get Farm Bill funding. CAFO permits are required at dairies with as few as 200 animal units, and every field covered by a nutrient management plan is tested for phosphorus.Also, the state had realistic best management practice (BMP) rates and may consider regulating pasture fencing, plus it outlined advanced dairy manure-processing technologies.New York State Acting Agriculture Commissioner Darrel J. Aubertine comments, “Through our existing AEM program, New York has demonstrated to EPA that a voluntary approach to on-farm environmental stewardship works to accomplish watershed goals.There are still many challenges to meet by 2025, but with the continued support of the AEM program, its educational, technical and financial resources, along with its strong partnerships, we are confident that we can meet the desired goals of the EPA without imposing additional regulations in production agriculture.”Two-thirds of Pennsylvania – the entire central portion – lies in the Bay’s watershed. By far the largest in the Bay area, the Susquehanna River Basin covers 21,000 square miles.John Frey, executive director of Pennsylvania’s Center for Dairy Excellence (CDE), says a very large percentage of Pennsylvania dairy farms are located within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Frey points out that the impact of the TMDL changes will differ according to the extent of the farms’ BMPs already in place.For example, the manure winter application ban proposal will affect smaller dairies which lack extended storage capacity, and Frey notes that the local state conservation district estimates the cost to build manure storage approaches $1,000 per cow.The required new manure management plan, expected to be released this spring, will cover nitrogen and phosphorus rates, application setbacks, winter application, pastures, barnyard runoff and storage and stacking criteria.The concentrated animal operations (CAO) plan addresses all nutrients, plus certified planner development, conservation district approval and public comment and annual inspection requirements.Recognizing that the dairy industry must deal with the TMDL requirements, Alan Zepp, CDE’s risk management specialist, observes, “Regulators must understand that today’s commodity markets do not allow individual farms to absorb the costs associated with regulation compliance.”Dairies will be included in the TMDL stormwater runoff regulations. More rigorous requirements are expected for mortality management, vegetative buffers, stream bank fencing and no-till planting. Manure-processing technologies will necessitate new research for smaller-scale viability.In addition, Frey notes discussions regarding capping expansion in the Bay watershed for existing CAFOs, even if the farm has access to an adequate land base. He says, “That could forever cap the ability to accommodate family members to join a growing business.”Lamonte Garber, agriculture program manager for the Pennsylvania office of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF), said an important point of Pennsylvania’s WIP relating to agriculture is compliance.“There have been good environmental standards on the books since the ’70s. The WIP focus is getting all farms into baseline conservation with existing regulations to achieve the agriculture reductions,” he says.Garber estimates that half of Pennsylvania farmers lack basic compliance.Garber pointed out that without strong federal oversight, states do not take some of the more difficult funding and policy steps. “Even in good budget years, agriculture was woefully underfunded.”One example is Pennsylvania’s REAP, its resource enhancement and protection tax credit program. Garber recalls that in 2007, the CBF, the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) and others worked together, and requested funding of $30 million per year.“At that time, the goal of the TMDL was roughly the same,” he recalls. However, only $10 million per year was approved – a fraction of the film industry tax credit. Farmers oversubscribed REAP within days. And, in this difficult economy, the program was halved to $5 million.Garber said the CBF sees agriculture as a much-preferred land use to development. “Good farm operations contribute less pollution per acre than development,” he analyzes. To reduce agriculture’s impact on the Bay, committing funds to strengthen agriculture will result in pollution reductions.Acknowledging that some requirements, such as barnyard improvement, will be a hardship for some dairy farms, Garber noted others, including precision feeding, stream bank fencing, no-till production and cover crops, make good economic sense.Citing the loss of 14 percent of dairy farms between 2006 and 2009, Garber concludes that the industry’s fundamental problem of low milk prices and high feed costs, not clean water programs, should be fixed.He adds, “Some groups are focusing on overturning the TMDL. It’s not the threat to Pennsylvania agriculture that has been claimed.“The next best opportunity is to work together for strong funding programs. CBF is working hard to secure EQIP and other conservation programs,” Garber stressed.EPA figures challengedA continuing concern of numerous farmers throughout the WIP process, including dairymen, was that BMPs that had not been cost-shared were not counted when EPA developed the TMDL allocations.The Agriculture Nutrient Policy Council’s Dec. 9, 2010, report questioned EPA’s data and model. Prepared by LimnoTech, the report compares EPA’s TMDLs with USDA’s draft report, “Assessment of the Effects of Conservation Practices on Cultivated Cropland in the Chesapeake Bay Region.”The report points to inconsistencies in the data and modeling. For example, the report says that USDA estimates conventional tillage at 7 percent, while EPA estimates 50 percent. USDA shows 88 percent of cropped acreage to be under conservation tillage of mulch or no-till; EPA estimates conservation tillage at 50 percent.USDA reports sediment loads to the Bay at 6,855 thousand tons, 14 percent from agriculture. EPA indicates sediment as 3,900 thousand tons, 65 percent from agriculture.Farm groups sue EPAOn Jan. 10, 2011, the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) filed a lawsuit to halt EPA’s TMDL plan. The Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) joined the suit the same day.The objections include the charge that EPA unlawfully “micromanages,” rather than allowing the states to decide actions under the Clean Water Act; EPA relied on inaccurate assumptions and a flawed model; and EPA violated the Administrative Procedures Act by failing to allow meaningful participation on the new rules.The Chesapeake Bay Foundation immediately responded, charging that the suit is not pro-farming but anti-clean water. CFB president Will Baker said, “Litigation will be long and costly for all involved and will likely do nothing but frustrate progress – perhaps the Farm Bureau’s real intent, in spite of rhetoric saying they support clean water.”The director of government relations for the National Milk Producers Federation, David Hickey, reports, “NMPF believes the lawsuit is the logical outcome given the major questions surrounding inadequate data and overreaching federal authority by the FDA.We concur with the key tenets of the complaint, as the Chesapeake Bay Watershed TMDL could result in irreparable harm to the region’s dairy producers. It is important to continue the vital cleanup of the Bay; however, the TMDL puts an unfair burden on the agriculture community.”The next stepThe Chesapeake Bay Watershed fiscal year 2011 action plan includes $490,550,424 among the 10-agency “federal family” for the Bay. Of that, $153,578,000 is allocated for agriculture through USDA, the bulk of it ($149,740,000) through NRCS programs.Of course, the individual states have funding programs as well. New technology and nutrient trading credits are expected to play a larger role in Pennsylvania.Restoring America’s impaired waterways is a long-standing, ongoing priority for EPA. In addition to efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay, there are concerted efforts focusing on lakes, rivers, bays and other waterways across the entire country.In introducing the Chesapeake Executive Order Strategy on May 13, 2010, Nancy Sutley, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, said this unprecedented effort by the federal government reflects the cornerstone principle of the administration’s overall approach to environmental improvement – science-based, collaborative and community-driven conservation.She added, “The solutions that we employ and develop here in the Chesapeake will inform our national environmental initiatives and can serve as a model for restoring important aquatic ecosystems all around the United States.” PDDorthy Noble is a freelance writer based out of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania.IMAGE The EPA has established its final total maximum daily load (TMDL) for the Chesapeake Bay watershed (pictured top right), noting it is the most comprehensive water quality roadmap the agency has ever done. Maps courtesy of Chesapeake Bay Program partners.last_img read more

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Farmington Hills Fire promotes four to career positions

first_imgFour Farmington Hills paid-on-call firefighters received promotions this month to make firefighting a full-time job.Malanden Blanch, Kayla Geffert, Christopher Inglese, and Jennifer Zuccarini were all officially sworn in as Career Firefighters by City Clerk Pam Smith. Members of the Fire Department, family members, Mayor Ken Massey, and other city officials attended the event.Pictured from left: Fire Marshal Jason Baloga, Career Firefighters Malanden Blanch, Kayla Geffert, Christopher Inglese and Jennifer Zuccarini, Fire Chief Jon Unruh (City of Farmington Hills)Blanch, hired in January 2013, is a Paramedic with Firefighter 1 & 2 and Fire Officer 1 certifications. He has received a Chain of Survival Award.Geffert was hired in September 2016. She is a Paramedic with Firefighter 1 & 2 certifications and is also a CPR instructor who helps teach the EMT program. She was named the 2016 Recruit Firefighter of the Year and the 2018 Firefighter of the Year for Fire Station 2. Geffert holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Hillsdale College, graduating Cum Laude while attending on an athletic scholarship for basketball. She recently graduated from Schoolcraft College with an Associate Degree in Applied Science.Hired in September 2014, Inglese is a Paramedic and has Firefighter 1 & 2 certifications. He is completing his Associate Degree in Applied Science from Schoolcraft College, is an instructor in the Fire Department Recruit School, and trains new recruits. He was the 2018 Firefighter of the Year for Fire Station 4.Zuccarini, who was hired in September 2014, is a Paramedic and has Firefighter 1 & 2 certifications. She routinely conducts Fire Prevention public education programs and takes part in the fall Fire Prevention Assembly Program for local elementary schools. Zuccarini received a Chain of Survival Award and is completing her Associate Degree in Applied Science at Schoolcraft College.All of the new firefighters are assigned to Fire Station 5, located on the City Hall campus.“The addition of these new firefighters helps to boost our staffing levels,” Fire Chief Jon Unruh said in a press release. “This, in turn, allows us to continue providing a high level of service to our citizens, even as our annual run volume increases.”The Farmington Hills Fire Department has experienced a 23 percent increase in incidents in the last seven years. Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Reported bylast_img read more

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