Rashford happy with senior England call-up

Manchester United striker Marcus Rashford believes that England manager Gareth Southgate has his best interests at heart and does not feel that he has been brought into the senior set-up too quickly, the 19-year-old has said.Rashford, who has eight caps for England, was scheduled to play in the U-21 European Championships in June, a decision United manager Jose Mourinho said “made no sense”.Southgate has included Rashford in the senior squad for Saturday’s World Cup qualifier against Scotland and a friendly against France on June 13.“He has had to think about what’s best for England and for me as a player,” Rashford said. “I’m happy to be with the seniors and to continue my development. It’s important to be on the same page.“It’s something you look forward to, being selected for your country … Whatever age group you’re called upon it’s important you have a mindset where you’re going to achieve great things.“To me it’s not being fast-tracked. There’s been a lot of games; England and United have dealt with it in a positive way.” read more

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Tiger considers teeing off again as big success

first_img“I’m playing again after 15 months of not competing,” Woods said. “It was that period of a month of two I just couldn’t get out of bed. I needed help. It was a tough time.“It’s just two different worlds. Things have improved so much I’m able to be here. It hasn’t been easy. It has been a lot of hard work.“Hopefully I can get out there and shoot something. I’m going to have to get after it and see what happens.”The 18-player invitational event hosted by Woods’ charity foundation will be played on a 7,267-yard, par-72 layout designed by Ernie Els at the Albany resort in the Bahamas featuring natural brush and sand. Bubba Watson is the defending champion.“I’m going to try to win this thing,” Woods, 40, said. “Bubba went low, shot 25 under. That’s going to be a tall order. I haven’t played in a while.“But hey, I’m going to give it my best, I’m going to be focused, I’m going to do what I can do and put the ball in the correct spots, give myself looks and try to bury these putts and post scores, and get myself in that mix come Sunday afternoon.”Bubba Watson and Tiger Woods speak with the media ahead of the Hero World Challenge at Albany, The Bahamas on November 29, 2016 in Nassau, Bahamas © Getty/AFP / Christian PetersenWoods has not played competitively since August of 2015 at the Wyndham Championship in Greensboro, North Carolina. He underwent back surgery a few weeks later and missed the entire 2015-16 season recovering.“I would like to play a full schedule. That would be great. Will I be able to? That I don’t know,” Woods said. “I don’t know what my back is going to be doing.”Woods, four shy of the all-time major record set by Jack Nicklaus, has not won a major since the 2008 US Open and has fallen to 898th in the world rankings, even joking his goal will be a top 1,000 ranking and admitting he is nervous about this week.“Yeah, there are nerves. I care about what I’m doing,” Woods said. “It’s about controling it and how fast I can get in the flow. I need to find the flow of the round. Hopefully I can do that quickly.”– Hybrid style –Woods is mixing old and new clubs and trying to fashion competitive form with a hybrid style, realizing his days of outdriving all rivals are done.“Hopefully I can put together some amalgamation of things and have some sort of a run,” Woods said. “I’m going to have to find different ways.”Tiger Woods (L) poses, alongside Pawan Munja of Hero Motocycles, for photographs ahead of the Hero World Challenge at Albany, The Bahamas on November 29, 2016 in Nassau, Bahamas © Getty/AFP / Christian PetersenWoods had planned a return in October at the US PGA season opener but withdrew saying he was not quite ready to return, delaying his comeback to this week.“I could do it, but why try to pull it off when I could wait and be ready?” Woods said. “I think I made the right decision.”Woods tees off in the sixth of nine pairings at noon in Thursday’s opening round alongside fellow American Patrick Reed, ending the longest layoff of his career after 466 days.Woods, whose 79 US PGA titles is three short of Sam Snead’s all-time record, has not won since the 2013 World Golf Championships Bridgestone Invitational in Akron, Ohio.“Winning is an evolution thing,” Woods said, noting that after the injuries, “I’m still at the beginning stages of that process.”A month before his 41st birthday, Woods said he blocks out fan expectations to focus on his goal of winning again.“It’s noise,” Woods said. “My job is to go out there and win golf tournaments.”Woods said he hopes to someday be a Ryder Cup captain but that won’t be soon.“I would be honored to be selected as a Ryder Cup captain,” Woods said. “But it’s not going to be for a while.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Tiger Woods speaks with the media ahead of the Hero World Challenge at Albany, The Bahamas on November 29, 2016 in Nassau, Bahamas © Getty/AFP / Christian PetersenNASSAU, Bahamas, Nov 29 – Tiger Woods measures success by just being able to compete at the Hero World Challenge, where the former world number one returns from the longest layoff of his career on Thursday.A back injury has sidelined the 14-time major champion since August of last year and at this event a year ago he wondered if he would ever play again.last_img read more

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Michel ascends to Stars hot seat

first_img“I’m proud that the Kenyan federation chose me to be at the helm of this national team.“Besides results, they have the wish to raise the standards of football in Kenya and I’m really interested in taking them to the highest levels in Africa,” said Michel through a translator.His brief is simple on paper but in accepting one of the most thankless jobs in international football, Michel was ushered into the deep end of the cesspool that is the signature of the Kenyan version of the beautiful game.In the past decade alone, the Stars coaching role has resembled musical chairs with no less than 13 changes at the helm, hardly the turnover a team aspiring to qualify for the World Cup or African Nations Cup needs. “We know that during the 2014 World Cup qualifiers, we didn’t have a good start to the competition “We will try our best to have good results and good behaviour on the pitch but we need time to work and consult on a few things,” he expressed.Like those before him, he stressed his main focus will be lifting the dwindling football standards in the country that lies in position 126 on the latest FIFA World Rankings.The tactician who has along standing experience in the continent will be assisted by his two French assistants, Florent Motta and Samir Ajam and one other local coach widely expected to be Rangers FC coach, James Nandwa who has been in acting capacity.While conceding that the work that lay ahead for him was no mean task, Michel said that he was upbeat of matching up to the huge expectations of the Kenyan football fans.Besides heading the national team, whose immediate task will be to prepare them for the Cecafa Senior Challenge Cup later this year, he will be expected to oversee youth developments through the junior teams that include the Under 17, 20 and 23 sides.“The next qualifier game will be in March next year, so we need time to get to work and give the opportunity to understand the local football which I don’t know very well.“We ask for support from all the stakeholders since we need it to achieve this together and I really need this since it’s in our heart and biggest wish to achieving this goal,” he underlined.FKF chair Sam Nyamweya delivered the dreaded vote of confidence when he stated they had confidence in the new tactician since he has wide experience with several African teams besides having been a player at national level himself.“The unveiling of Michel is a significant step in our football, not just based on his nationality as a foreigner but since he’s the best from the several applicants we received.“He has an impressive CV and understands the expectations that supporters have on him as we look to qualification to the World Cup and we are convinced he is up to task,” added Nyamweya as he showered praise on the new man.However, Nyamweya is notoriously reputed to play to the gallery when the occasion calls as he displayed when hiring and firing Francis Kimazi, Michel’s immediate predecessor and should results not be immediate, the FKF boss will not hesitate to dump the Frenchman at the earliest opportunity.“The new man has to focus on the critical issue of youth development which is the core for any football nation with a vision for continuity.“He must bear in mind that we have many local talents particularly under the age of 23 who are eager to learn and only need some nurturing to see us have a team that is basically tailored towards the future,” said Jack Oguda, CEO, Tusker Premier League, the country’s topflight club competition.“The federation should perhaps invest some funds to enable the coach travel to see how the professional players are fairing in the international leagues and keep up with their progress to avoid the disappointments that have been manifest when they fail to sparkle in the team colours,” he added. And that has been the bane of all those who have handled the national team with the financial handicap being cited as the biggest impediment ad infinitum. For instance, this is a team used to playing local sides in friendlies ahead of crucial qualifiers, lack of player and official allowances a refrain and above all development structures only exist in rhetoric.Michel, the second Frenchman at the helm of the team in its history is a former French footballer, has been at the World Cup with Cameroon (1994), Morocco (1998), Tunisia (2002) and Ivory Coast (2006) in addition to coaching giant clubs like Zamalek of Egypt, Raja Casablanca of Morocco and South Africa’s Sundowns.He was also instrumental in the preparations of this year’s Africa Cup of Nations co-hosts, Equatorial Guinea before falling out with the country’s federation chiefs over the sides’ final team selection.Michel was selected from a wide list of applicants that were whittled down to four that included Adel Amrouche, Tom Saintfiet and former France coach, Raymond Domenech.Former Le Bleu keeper, Bernard Lama pitched camp in Nairobi in 2006 and three months later, left in a huff when his ambitious decade-long plan for the team was resisted due to its spiralling costs with defeat to Eritrea used to hasten his exit.Kenya has been without a national team coach since Kimanzi was fired in May at the height of the inquest to poor performances after the country was knocked out of the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations qualifiers and managed a solitary point from their opening two fixtures of the World Cup qualifiers.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000NAIROBI, Kenya, August 28- Frenchman Henri Michel will need to summon all his 30 years of experience to make the desired impression having finally been enthroned to the poisoned chalice that is the Harambee Stars head coaching role.On Tuesday night in Nairobi, Michel who has coached seven countries prior, six of them in Africa, was unveiled as the 31st manager of Stars with the fizzy pop of a champagne welcome never before accorded to his processors by Football Kenya Federation.last_img read more

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17th Street Bridge in Dawson Creek closed due to high water levels

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The City of Dawson Creek has closed the 17th Street Bridge because of rising water levels in the city’s namesake, though officials don’t believe that the water will rise to levels last seen two years ago.Dawson Creek’s General Manager of Development Services Kevin Henderson said the City decided to close the 17th Street bridge earlier today as a precautionary measure. Henderson explained that the water in Dawson Creek did overtop the bridge for a short time this morning, though it has since receded to approximately a foot below the road level.The bridge was one of several that were closed during the floods of June 2016, though it reopened a short time after.- Advertisement -Henderson said that the city’s other bridges and culverts, including the one that was famously overtopped two years ago on 8th St., are currently faring well with the high water levels. He said that officials have so far not had any reports of damage to residents’ property. Henderson added however that the situation may change as water levels tend to peak in the late afternoon due to the warn daytime temperatures.As another precautionary measure, the City of Dawson Creek is handing out free sand bags for residents. The sandbags and sand will be made available at the west side of Kitchen Park, at the corner of 18th Street and 109th Avenue. Henderson said that although the creek is not expected to reach levels seen in prior floods, there may be some residents who could use sandbags to divert runoff.Updates can be found on the City’s Facebook page.Advertisementlast_img read more

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WATCH: Magical Messi scores 18-minute hat-trick for Argentina in Copa America

first_imgAll the talk on Friday night was about Dimitri Payet’s wonder goal for hosts France in the opening game of Euro 2016.But thousands of miles away in Chicago, Lionel Messi was once again demonstrating why he is the best player in the world at the Copa America.The little Barcelona genius has been carrying a back injury and, having missed Argentina’s opening group game, was named among the subsitutes against Panama.He was finally introduced with an hour on the clock – and wasted no time in making his impact on the tournament by firing a stunning hat-trick inside 18 minues.Check out all the goals above.last_img read more

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Valley couple’s film changes lives

first_imgWhen Northridge residents Deborah and Jonathan Flora join the March for Life in Washington, D.C., on Monday, they won’t be carrying the usual signs or banners, but a burden – and a film. The burden is the agony, guilt and regret that still plague Jonathan nearly three decades after he helped procure an abortion for a girlfriend during his freshman year in college. To this day, he’s haunted by “the idea that I could have a 26-year-old son or daughter, especially when I look at those statistics that one in four people in that age group aren’t here.” And from that burden springs the film. The Floras understand that if you want to change the culture, you need to engage it. So the couple put their talents – he’s a producer for Disney’s Buena Vista Home Entertainment, she’s an actress and former Miss Colorado – to work, creating an independent movie that raises chilling and provocative questions about our society and our attitudes toward unborn children. The movie is being screened for activists and politicians alike in Washington this weekend, and it’s generating profound results across the nation. The film, “A Distant Thunder,” is no boring, preachy documentary. It’s a half-courtroom drama, half-supernatural thriller that moves at a jarring pace and contains enough intrigue and creepiness to keep its target audience – teenagers – riveted. And its message is poignant. Written and directed by Jonathan and starring Deborah, “A Distant Thunder” centers around the prosecution of a crime committed during a botched partial-birth abortion. In a courtroom exchange straight out of “Law & Order,” we learn about what partial-birth abortion entails (partially delivering a baby, feet first, then, while her head remains in the birth canal, puncturing her skull and suctioning out her brain), and we’re invited to consider the effects of all abortion on mother and child alike. Although an indie, “A Distant Thunder” is no garage production. It was shot on 35 mm film with professional actors and impressive special effects. Its surprise ending is truly shocking, and convicting. The film is as polished as anything you would find at the local megaplex – if movies like “A Distant Thunder” could make it to the local megaplex. Alas, this is the sort of project, raising tough questions starkly at odds with Hollywood’s social and political ethos, that the studios would never touch. “The Cider House Rules” and “Million Dollar Baby” may be fair game in Tinseltown, Oscar material, no less, but showbiz isn’t ready for the likes of “A Distant Thunder.” Fortunately, the Floras were. They made the film entirely on their own time, without being paid a cent. Producer Kip Perry put up his own money – and not that of his studio, Echo Entertainment – to cover the productions costs. It was a brave move in a town that celebrates independent thinking only as long as it doesn’t conflict with the prevailing ideology. As Jonathan explains, with remarkable understatement, “If you’re a filmmaker and trying to get something on your resume, this isn’t a subject matter that would be highly recommended.” But he was willing to take the professional risk. “I actually was more afraid not to do it. I didn’t want to be caught standing on the sidelines when I thought there was something we could do.” For Deborah, the motivation was also personal. She was 11 weeks pregnant with the couple’s son, Benjamin, at the time of the filming. Having struggled to get pregnant before conceiving their daughter, Olivia, less than two years earlier, Deborah gained a very real sense of how fragile and precious life is. She couldn’t reconcile that sense with a society that quietly disposes of some 1.4 million “unwanted” persons a year, while countless would-be parents wait in vain to adopt. Nor could she stand the thought of millions of American women being left in the dark about the facts of human development or abortion’s long-term psychological effects. “One of the big issues I’ve always had,” she says, “is empowering women. And if you really want to empower women, the real way to do that is to provide them with information. … If you can get information out there in the form of an entertaining film, I’ve found that really opens doors.” Even though “A Distant Thunder” is unmistakable in its point of view, it scrupulously avoids condemnation or pointing fingers. In the film’s treatment of abortion, mother and child are both sympathetic victims. Perhaps that’s why the Floras report getting overwhelmingly positive response from post-abortive women, and men, too – because the movie understands their sorrow, their sense of powerlessness, their desperation and their exploitation. Because “A Distant Thunder” isn’t megaplex material, the Floras have had to rely on word of mouth – as well as Netflix, Amazon.com and the film’s Web site, adistantthunder.com – for distribution. They also kept the movie to a short 35 minutes so that youth groups, politicians and others would be more likely to watch it. The strategy seems to have paid off. The film has generated attraction from numerous members of Congress, and it’s being featured at several March for Life-related events in Washington this weekend. After the march on Monday – the 33rd anniversary of Roe v. Wade – the Floras will address the crowd from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court building. But far more important to the couple is the way “A Distant Thunder” has affected at least three lives. A few months ago, the Floras received an e-mail about a young couple at a local college, who, like Jonathan and his freshman-year girlfriend nearly three decades ago, found themselves with an unwanted pregnancy. The couple’s inclination was to turn to the devastating “choice” that society insists is the only legitimate option for people in their situation. Then a friend showed them “A Distant Thunder,” and their eyes and hearts were opened wide. As the credits rolled, the boyfriend turned to his girlfriend and said, “We can’t do this, let’s get married and have this baby.” Some films win Oscars, the Floras’ does much more. Chris Weinkopf is the Daily News’ editorial-page editor. Write to him by e-mail at chris.weinkopf@dailynews.com. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Belarus election labeled ‘farce’

first_imgMINSK, Belarus – Thousands of protesters thronged the main square of the Belarusian capital on Sunday in defiance of a government ban, refusing to recognize a presidential vote that gave a landslide – and largely expected – victory to the iron-fisted incumbent. At the opposition demonstration in the capital’s main square – the largest in years – protesters chanted “Long Live Belarus!” and the name of the main opposition candidate. Some waved a historic flag that President Alexander Lukashenko had replaced with a Soviet-style design, while others waved European Union flags. Lukashenko won a third term with 82.6 percent of the vote, compared with 6 percent for Alexander Milinkevich, the main opposition candidate, the Central Election Commission chief said early today, citing a nearly complete preliminary count from Sunday’s balloting. Turnout was 92.6 percent, the commission said. “We demand new, honest elections,” Milinkevich told the crowd Sunday evening. “This was a complete farce.” “The Belarusian mentality is to sit home and watch their stupid state TV,” said one protester, who gave only his first name, Ivan, for fear of reprisals. “I came to hear a brave man speak.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88 Milinkevich called on the crowd, which began thinning under a heavy snow, to return to the square this evening – signaling the opposition would try to hold a sustained protest of the sort that brought down long-lived regimes in former Soviet republics including Ukraine and Georgia. “It will be a peaceful demonstration. We will come out with flowers,” Milinkevich said earlier in the day, after voting. Lukashenko, who has ruled Belarus since 1994, had promised to prevent the kind of mass rallies that helped bring opposition leaders to power elsewhere. The use or threat of force neutralized opposition efforts to protest vote results in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan last year, and a government crackdown in Uzbekistan left hundreds dead. Despite the government ban, police did not move to disperse the crowd. The gathering was the biggest the opposition had mustered in years, reaching at least 10,000 before it started thinning out, according to AP reporters’ estimates. last_img read more

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CalArts provides creative summer learning

first_imgVALENCIA – Can grease stains in a pizza box be the subject of a poem? That’s just one of the questions high school students from all over the state have been asked this summer as they participate in a four-week program at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia. Writing a poem that breaks the rules of line and meter, or practicing a pas-de-deux in ballet class and following the art’s rules to perfection – the students take a variety of different paths. Even stains on a pizza box can be an inspiration. Jenn Garrison, 16, found that out on an assignment in her creative writing class. This year, the state increased the amount of funding it provides the program, so next summer California students will need to pay no more than $1,350, Jaffe said. “By law, no one is denied admission solely on the basis of inability to pay,” he said. Fourteen students attended the program from out-of-state this year. “High school is very conventional, whereas (at) this place we’re all unconventional,” said music student Andrew Inadomi, 15, as he sat on a bench cradling a guitar. alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2“We found grease stains in the boxes and we made them into pictures and then we drew them, and then we write poems about them,” said Garrison of Westlake Village. “You’re finding things in, like, what you never thought you could find things before. Like, you become aware of, like, your surroundings.” This year, 514 students in grades 8-12 participated in the four-week program, called InnerSpark, or the California State Summer School for the Arts. About 45 percent of students received scholarship money to attend the program, while the rest paid nearly $2,200. “It’s a chance for talented, but most importantly, motivated students to work intensively with the best talent available,” said Robert Jaffe, director of the program. The California State Summer School for the Arts was created in 1985 by the state of California. The InnerSpark program is supported by a mixture of funding from the state and private sources. last_img read more

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Being ‘a Marine all the time’ keeps some recruiters on straight, narrow

first_imgSAN JOSE On a warm spring Tuesday, a 19-year-old girl walks into the Marine Recruiting Office and flings herself into the fake leather chair, adjusting a spaghetti strap on her skimpy tank top. Marine Corps Sgt. Edward Green, in a pressed and neat uniform, greets her warmly, with a genuine smile and a handshake. Green has long, dark lashes, tight shoulders and the chest of a wrestler. He’s 23, opens doors for women and remembers everyone’s names. If girls are flirting with him, he says he doesn’t notice. And he certainly doesn’t respond. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.This girl had filled out an online form from the Marine’s recruiting Web site asking for more information. Green called her up and invited her in. For the next hour, an intense conversation ensues. She talks fast, her voice shaking at times as she explains that her father is urging her to enlist, that he wants her to have some structure in her life. “I want the courage to stand up for myself,” she says. “I never looked up to my mother. She was nothing. She never did anything. I don’t want to stay at home like my mother. But I can’t do a pushup, just to let you know. I don’t know how. Can you teach me?” She slouches forward onto the table, leaning her chin onto her folded hands and pouting for a moment. He asks why she wants to be a Marine. “I just want to be hot. I just want to be buff. I want to be fit,” she says. “Do you think I’ll lose a couple of pounds in boot camp? Do you think I will?” Green loves the Marines. He loves the institution, the public service, the noble tradition dating back to the American Revolution. He even loves his uniform. He’s done two tours in Iraq, and is now putting in a few years as a recruiter, which is one way to increase his chances of being promoted. Like his fellow military recruiters around the country, Green spends hours a day making cold calls to high school students whose names are on lists provided by high schools as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act. He also walks around high school and junior college campuses, and has one-on-one meetings in the recruiting offices with potential enlistees. It’s far more stressful than it sounds. The military calls it one of the toughest assignments a service member can have. There is immense pressure on recruiters to meet their mission, their numbers. In Sgt. Green’s case, this means two new recruits each month. Increased hostilities in Iraq make it tough to persuade young people to join. Further, Defense Department researchers estimate that more than half of the people in this country between 16 and 21 don’t meet the military’s eligibility requirements. Recruiters who fail to meet their mission can be yelled at, harangued and humiliated. They rarely take vacations, and they are often isolated, living off base in the communities where they recruit. Half the recruiters in this country say they are dissatisfied with the job and three out of four say they would choose another assignment if they were allowed to, according to a 2005 internal Defense Department survey of recruiters, released in part in a General Accounting Office report. Suicide, drugs and alcohol are a problem among recruiters in all branches. So is sexual misconduct. “Look,” says Green, grabbing a quick sandwich between recruiting sessions. “It’s easy to stay out of trouble at this. All you do is stay professional. Every day, all the time. I’m a Marine all the time, not just sometimes. I take that very seriously.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Gordon: Celtic need to work like a team in defence

first_img“We will sort it out and do it quickly and get back to keeping clean sheets which we have been doing in the past few seasons.” Craig Gordon has said Celtic have to start defending as a team if they are to end the lapses that have proved costly so far this season.Manager Brendan Rodgers bemoaned the loss of a “soft” goal in the 1-1 draw against Suduva and had previously listed mistakes at the back in early European games and against Hearts. Gordon said a change in mentality was needed to improve.“I think that everybody is every man for themselves in there”,” the goalkeeper told Press Association Sport. “We need to get back to working as a team and make sure that nobody gets the headers in that they have been doing. “We have to put a stop to that, we will put a stop to that. I am very confident that we will get it right and get it right very quickly.” Gordon pointed out that the team had enjoyed a formidable defensive record in Rodgers’ time at the club until now and he was confident that the problems would be easily eradicated. “We have been very good at that in recent seasons,” he said. “We have been going on with 50 per cent clean sheets which is an incredible record. “To go from that to losing goals the way we are – we need to put that right. “But we have done it in the past. We know what we are doing wrong and we have to fix it. last_img read more

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