Adam Chanler-Berat, Tavi Gevinson & Andy Grotelueschen Join Assassins Revival at Classic Stage

first_img Brandon Uranowitz Three New York stage regulars have been added to the cast of Classic Stage Company’s upcoming production of Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman’s 1990 musical Assassins. The previously announced off-Broadway production, directed by CSC Artistic Director John Doyle, will run from April through May 2020.New to the cast are Adam Chanler-Berat (Next to Normal, Amélie) as John Hinckley Jr., Tavi Gevinson (The Crucible, This Is Our Youth) as Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme and Tony nominee Andy Grotelueschen (Tootsie, Into the Woods) as Samuel Byck.They join the previously announced Steven Pasquale as John Wilkes Booth, four-time Tony nominee Judy Kuhn as Sara Jane Moore, Tony nominee Will Swenson as Charles Guiteau, three-time Tony nominee Brandon Uranowitz as Leon Czolgosz and Wesley Taylor as Giuseppe Zangara.Assassins explores the lives of nine men and women who either killed (or tried to kill) one of the Presidents of the United States. From John Wilkes Booth to Lee Harvey Oswald and beyond, the stories of our country’s most successful and would-be assassins intersect in unexpected ways, creating a powerful, yet unnervingly funny look at some of the most shocking moments in U.S. history. Will Swenson Steven Pasquale Assassins View Comments Andy Grotelueschen View All (6) Star Files Adam Chanler-Berat Wesley Taylor Adam Chanler-Berat, Tavi Gevinson & Andy Grotelueschen(Photos: Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com) Related Showslast_img read more

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‘Defending Our Democracy’ with Secretary of State Jim Condos, Thursday

first_imgVermont Business Magazine On Thursday, April 19th from 4pm to 6pm Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos will be hosting a forum on election cybersecurity at the Pavilion Auditorium, located at 109 State Street(link is external) in Montpelier. The presentation will cover background information on recent events impacting election cybersecurity and the safeguards in place protecting Vermont’s voter registration and election systems. There will be dedicated time for questions from attendees. The forum is open to all and no registration is required.“Elections are the core of our democracy, and ensuring the security and integrity of our elections is a top priority” said Secretary Condos. “In this age of technological advances and the growing cyber threat posed by foreign adversaries, ensuring free and fair elections has become increasingly complicated. I’d like to invite members of the public, the media, state or local officials, and any other interested individuals to attend and learn about what we’re doing in Vermont to safeguard your vote.”Secretary Condos will be joined by Deputy Secretary of State Chris Winters, Elections Director Will Senning and Matt McCann from the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), a national partner with Vermont in election cybersecurity efforts.“The Department of Homeland Security values our partnership with Secretary Condos as we work together to improve the security of the election process” said DHS Senior Cybersecurity Advisor Matt Masterson. “Secretary Condos and the local election officials across the state are committed to providing secure and resilient elections to the voters of Vermont. We will continue to work with Secretary Condos and state and local officials across the nation to provide the support necessary to ensure a smooth and secure election process.”Source: Secretary of State Condoslast_img read more

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Franklin County Economic Report: A long road back to the pre-pandemic

first_imgPhoto: Cows grazing in Franklin, VT. Photo: Andrew Godin.by Joy Choquette, Vermont Business MagazineFamous Vermonter Norman Rockwell once said, “The view of life I communicate in my pictures excludes the sordid and the ugly. I paint life as I would like it to be.” As towns and counties throughout the state reel in the wake of COVID-19 and residents adjust to a “new normal,” this quote is apt.The financial picture in Franklin County isn’t as bright as it was last year at this time, said Mayor Tim Smith.But although challenges abound, Smith has been impressed with the hard-working attitude exhibited by those in the local workforce during the pandemic. He has also been encouraged by some positive steps forward.COVID-19’s Effect on Franklin CountyThe largest challenge to the county during COVID-19, Smith said, was the dismissal of schools in the area. The connectivity and meals that children receive through the school system are essential in many students’ lives. To have those things suddenly disrupted left school administrators, teachers, and parents scrambling to find their footing, Smith noted.Working parents and kids staying home alone when daycares closed earlier this spring were real concerns.“The impact to families and individuals was great,” said Smith.Photo: Tim Smith, Mayor of St. Albans. Courtesy Photo.Additionally, employees who had the option of working at home were responsible for balancing their own regular workload in a new setting. And parents had the additional burden of doing so alongside homeschooling their children.Other challenges in the county continue to crop up, said Smith, after-effects of COVID-19. A major issue recently is the possible impending Homeland Security layoffs.“We have a large employee base here in St Albans,” said Smith. “When you look at laying off 60 to 70 percent of the workforce—the impact on families will be huge.”Vermont’s congressional delegation are among many in Congress that were able to stave off those furloughs, at least for now.In addition, dairy prices have nosedived, and dairy farmers are struggling significantly, said Smith.“The financial packages that are being brought to bear are just a drop in the bucket compared to what they [farmers] are dealing with,” Smith explained.A year ago, milk prices were on the rise and unemployment rates in the area were low. A number of projects were moving forward, said Smith, but now all that has changed.“Now, depending on what happens with immigration and the dairy industry, it may be a long road back,” Smith said.Economic Development Coordinator of the Town of Swanton/Franklin County Industrial Development Corporation, Elisabeth Nance, noted that COVID-19 required nimbleness as employees and employers have had to learn to adapt to rapidly changing conditions.Photo: Elisabeth Nance, economic development coordinator of the Town of Swanton/Franklin County Industrial Corporation. Courtesy Photo.“For employees, it is keeping up with the resources that are available while trying to juggle changes at work and in the home. For employers, it is understanding the various programs that are available and getting in the queue to get funds or other assistance,” said Nance.“From an organizational standpoint, it has been a challenge to effectively communicate what resources are available in a timely manner given the rapid changes while addressing the challenge of working from home,” Nance noted that learning to navigate virtual meetings is a specific challenge. “On the other hand, we’ve seen higher attendance because people don’t have to travel to get to their various meetings,” Nance noted.Economic Successes in Franklin CountyThough the dairy industry in the area has recently taken a hit, as noted by Smith, it also received some good news. The Dairy Farmers of America (DFA), kicked off a $30 million investment to its plant in St Albans.This investment includes improvements and upgrades to milk storage, milk handling, receiving, and process and flow within the facility, said Brad Keating, senior vice president, and chief operating officer of DFA’s Northeast Area. A virtual groundbreaking event took place on July 15. The DFA merged with the St Albans Cooperative Creamery last year.Additionally, approximately $10 million has been earmarked for new tractors and trailers to support milk hauling.“We remain committed to keep investing in Vermont and our overall infrastructure to support our members,” said Keating during the virtual groundbreaking event.Governor Phil Scott stated, “This new project in Franklin County is important to our economy, helping farmers and those who make a living off the land, which in the end will help consumers.” He also noted that “By building these new bays and silos, it shows DFAs commitment to the future and our state.”A positive to come out of the pandemic, was seeing residents in the region continue to patronize local businesses as soon as the phases of re-opening occurred, stated Chip Sawyer, director of planning and development for St Albans City.“Many businesses were quick to find ways to get their products to customers or find ways to keep their employees working using whatever means they had and supports provided by the government,” said Sawyer.Also, Sawyer believes that the diverse landscape of businesses in the county is a plus.“In the end, Franklin County still has a good balance of jobs in various sectors, from retail to manufacturing, and a strong base of businesses that contribute to the quality of life.”Photo: DFA improvements to the dairy facility, Federal Street, St. Albans. Courtesy Photo. Economic Challenges in Franklin CountyWhile COVID-19 has presented its own set of very real challenges for business owners, other economic challenges already existed in Franklin County. Companies were challenged with finding workers long before the pandemic, Nance said.In addition, “There are some workers who are currently making more on unemployment than they made at their pre-COVID jobs so they may not yet be looking for work,” said Nance. “Others are faced with needing to transition to another job,” Nance stated, “that takes time and is often uncomfortable.”Adam Paxman, president of the Swanton Chamber of Commerce, agreed. On a county level, getting people back to work has been a challenge.Paxman explained, “There is no incentive to go back when they are making more on unemployment.”The initial federal unemployment benefit expired July 25. But a new program could be authorized by Congress and an executive order by President Trump is likely to backdate up to $400 a week to that time. The details on that plan were still being worked out at VBM’s press time.Not being able to hold social events at an organizational level has been an ongoing hardship.“Community events bring people and commerce into the community and promote the sense of community,” said Paxman. “Organizations which promote these events have not been able to continue their mission of community promotions.”Paxman stated that Act 250 is an ongoing challenge for local businesses. “We say we are business-friendly, but we really are not,” said Paxman. “The education tax we are forced to pay is a weakness all caused by not being business-friendly.”In order to solve this problem, he would like to see schools responsible for their own budgets.“Find another way to pay for the education tax. If the school system is in the red, deal with it and cut the budget,” Paxman said. “That’s the way it works with a household or a business. You cut out the fat in your budget and live simpler so you can afford to keep living.”Nance agreed that Act 250 does create challenges for businesses.“There are a lot of Act 250-related restrictions and time restraints,” she said. “Some of the best places to put businesses aren’t options because of wetlands.”She said that though she appreciates the protection of Vermont’s ecosystem, she believes, “In trying to do the right thing we sometimes go a little overboard.”Sawyer sees what he calls “familiar systematic issues” in the county continuing.“The lack of available modern office, warehouse, and manufacturing space built on spec for businesses that would like to grow or locate to our county,” is number one.Second, “The regionally-coined ‘Formidable Four’ barriers to workforce sustainability: housing, transportation, childcare, and substance use disorder.”Third, “the need to expand broadband access throughout our county—especially now,” Sawyer noted, are all challenges to the county’s economy.Smith concurred. “The number one piece is that there are no vacancies for manufacturing or industrial needs for warehousing.”If there is no tenant in place, getting a lease with the bank is impossible.“We have nothing to show businesses interested in coming to the county as far as options for sites,” Smith noted. He believes the solution is straightforward. “Capital investment in facilities and buildings that  would help us recruit new business on a regular basis.”Doing Business in Franklin County NowFranklin County, like every other county in Vermont and most of the country, has been hit hard economically by COVID-19. For months, businesses were closed completely or had to find a new way to offer services or products in order to stay afloat.The bar and restaurant industry has been one of the hardest hit. According to the National Restaurant Association, $120 billion in lost revenues had occurred as of the end of May.Tom Murphy is the owner of Twiggs American Gastropub. The restaurant and bar, located on Main Street in downtown St Albans like every other eatery, has undergone extremely stressful changes with the new restrictions in place during COVID-19.Photo: Tom Muphy, owner of Twiggs. Photo: Twiggs.Typically in an average month, Murphy stated that Twiggs earned between $30,000 to $40,000 in alcohol sales alone. That figure dropped down to between $5,000 to $6,000 during the pandemic.Despite the challenges, Murphy called it, “The best thing that’s ever happened to the restaurant. I’m not saying COVID and sickness and death is the best thing that’s ever happened,” Murphy clarified, “but we’ve been two to three times busier than we’ve been in the history of the restaurant.”Murphy coordinated a free spaghetti dinner for the community which fed 1,600 people. Twiggs also began creating family-style meals that were delivered by the restaurant staff.“Waitstaff became delivery drivers, people helped out in the kitchen, everything really came together,” said Murphy. “Our goal was to keep people employed and serve the community.”Despite the positive approach in the face of challenges, Murphy acknowledges that there are very real struggles not only for his business but others in the area as well.“The stories I hear are not great ones,” said Murphy.Predictions by the National Restaurant Association indicate that the revenues lost by restaurants nationwide could rise to as much as $240 billion by the end of 2020.Still, Murphy has chosen to stay positive and focus on what he can control. He believes that the pandemic may teach business owners important lessons, particularly those that work together and are open to learning how to pivot.The four deadly words in business—especially in these challenging times Murphy believes—is “I’ll do it myself.”Working together, sharing ideas, and collaborating are ways in which Murphy believes business owners might come out stronger on the other side of COVID-19.“It seems that everyone is learning from everyone else. The only way we’re going to really figure it out is communicating and the emotional intel of our community together.”Paxman stated that the potential expansion of the Franklin County State Airport, located in Highgate, would be a big help to the county.“If the expansion of this airport comes to fruition it will be a huge positive for economic growth,” said Paxman.The airport could receive more than $2.2 million in federal funds, according to the Vermont Agency of Transportation. The money would be used to support rebuilding the airport’s existing runway and expanding it.Continuing to build relationships between businesses in Franklin County and those directly over the border in Canada—once the borders are reopened—is a big benefit that the county has, said Paxman. He calls the Swanton’s location a huge opportunity.“The environment is ripe to entice new business from Canada,” Paxman said.Outlook for 2020 and BeyondThe county has opportunities that it can capitalize on, stated Sawyer. A solid residential base means that Franklin County can thrive and provide value in nearly every employment sector. This will reduce the need for so many residents to commute out of the area.Also, “There are ongoing efforts to find regional synergies to address the ‘Formidable Four’ barriers to workforce sustainability,” said Sawyer.Cuts and financial hardships at the county’s hospital, Northwestern Medical Center (NMC) along with the proposed furloughs at Homeland Security are big challenges that will need to be addressed carefully.Sawyer noted that these have been and will continue to be hard on the community. He hopes that these major employers will bounce back in when more COVID-related restrictions are lifted and easier phases are in place.“Franklin and Grand Isle counties used to have a very successful workforce investment board,” said Nance. “Due to the loss of state funds the coordinator position was eliminated but bringing someone back into that position would give employers and employees a liaison who could identify necessary skills and the resources available.”The Town of Swanton received $1 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. These will be loaned to Leader Evaporator to provide working capital while the new president, Jeff Smith, completes the company’s turnaround plan, said Nance.Photo: Recently completed Ace Hardware, just one of a few projects in Swanton’s economic revitalization. Photo by Katie Kittell.The fact that the county’s unemployment rate is 11.6 percent versus the state average of 12.7 percent, gives Nance hope.“That suggests that Franklin County is better situated than some other parts of Vermont. This owes to some migration of people and businesses out of Chittenden County and a strong business base with loyal consumers,” Nance noted.Smith believes community improvement projects in the areas of Enosburg, Richford, and Swanton are going to be very valuable the rest of this year and beyond. He referred to the example that St Albans City set several years ago when it upgraded its downtown area.“These towns are doing a lot of things to improve their communities and I think a lot of that was seeing the example of what St Albans did in the last several years. They’re trying to build on that momentum,” said Smith.Murphy was open about the fact that he was not initially a proponent of the stimulus project in downtown St Albans. He remained skeptical but has been pleasantly surprised in the outcome. He said that he hopes other business owners utilize the opportunities that the stimulus money provided.“I hope it’s directed to the right places,” said Murphy. “That story has yet to be told.”Despite the improved downtown area, Murphy said that he’s still very worried about it.“I’ve been standing on it for 10 years now and more and more businesses are gone. I think we need to look at a different type of business coming to town.”While people open businesses with great ideas and energy, these very often fizzle out months or years later.Murphy stated that he’s seeing more retail and commercial spaces on the ground-floor level of Main Street turned into housing. He himself, recently purchased the building next door to the restaurant and turned it into condos.If this trend continues though, what will draw visitors to the downtown area?“What are you going to bring in that’s going to make it?” Murphy asked. “That’s a real question because you can’t compete with big businesses. I think we’ve got to think of a different way of doing business on small-town Main Street.”Franklin County experienced a .83 percent increase in population growth in 2020. Now 50,249 residents live in the area, according to World Population Review. The county is evenly split between male and female residents, according to The US Census Bureau. The majority of individuals, 90.8 percent, have a high school education and/or college degree.From 2014 to 2018—the most recent statistics captured—the US Census Bureau stated that 69 percent of the population is employed (ages 16 and older). The median income was just over $64,000 per year.There are 16 towns which make up Franklin County: Bakersfield, Berkshire, East Berkshire, Enosburg Falls, Fairfax, Fairfield, Fletcher, Franklin, Georgia, Highgate, Highgate Springs, Montgomery, Richford, Sheldon, St Albans Town and Swanton. St Albans City is the seat of the county.The most recent census data in 2016 indicated that 4,479 places of employment existed in the county. Those numbers have fluctuated slightly in recent times.Due to a strong manufacturing focus in the county, however, many businesses remain less impacted by COVID-19 than in other parts of the state. Businesses are located throughout the 633 square-mile county, with the majority being in the St Albans City and Town areas.Joy Choquette is a freelance writer from Franklin County.last_img read more

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Shawnee Mission will reschedule SMNW, SMN Homecoming dates after conflict with Yom Kippur

first_imgWhen Joyce Rosenberg went to check her kids’ school schedule for the coming semester, she felt like throwing up her hands in exasperation.The Shawnee Mission Northwest Homecoming football game and dance were set to be held Friday and Saturday, Sept. 29 and 30 — the same days as Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar, which families mark with a day of fasting and religious services. Rosenberg has two children who will be students at SM Northwest this coming year, and her youngest will be in the marching band. She had been hoping the whole family would have been able to come out to support her freshman son during the Homecoming game performance.“I just felt like, ‘Okay, really?’” she said Wednesday night. “You really can’t do both, so we’ll have to choose.”And Jewish families at SM Northwest weren’t the only ones who would have been affected by the scheduling conflict. Shawnee Mission North’s Homecoming game and dance were set for the weekend of Sept. 29 as well.However, it now appears that Jewish families at SM Northwest and SM North won’t have to wrestle with the conflicted schedules after all.The district hasn’t addressed how the scheduling error came about — public districts typically receive notice from the local Jewish Community Relations Bureau and American Jewish Committee each year about the scheduling of Jewish holidays — but it did take action to address the conflict once the issue came to administrators’ attention earlier this week. The principals from SM Northwest and SM North met with Marvin Szneler of the JCRB this morning to discuss the best way to address the situation.“After the district became aware of this conversation in our community, we immediately wanted to take the action necessary to ensure that we were serving all our students,” said Interim Shawnee Mission Superintendent Kenny Southwick. “We had a wonderful discussion today with our partners at the Jewish Relations Bureau, and they provided advice on impacts for our Jewish students. With deep respect for all religious and cultural issues, the district will be changing those homecoming dates for both SMNW and SMN. ”Southwick said the dates for the rescheduled Homecomings hasn’t been set, but that the district should be able to announce it in the near future.“[I]t was never the intention of the district to overlap any religious celebrations and our homecoming events,” he said.last_img read more

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Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit Go Above Ground With L-Acoustics at the Caverns

first_imgPELHAM, Tennessee – November 2020 – Home of the Emmy-winning PBS television series Bluegrass Underground, The Caverns is a naturally-occurring subterranean amphitheater at the base of the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee’s Pelham valley. Having hosted performances from many of the biggest and fastest-rising names in music, its Big Mouth Cave annually draws more than 50,000 visitors to experience concerts in a truly unique setting with natural acoustics and otherworldly beauty. However, like all other music venues in 2020, even this prehistoric site had to close its “mouth” for the current pandemic. But that didn’t stop Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit from kicking off The Caverns’ new COVID-compliant “Above Ground Concert Series” with a four-night run of outdoor shows on the grounds above the cave with an L-Acoustics K1/K2 system deployed by Escondido, California-based Sound Image. For ten years, Sound Image has been the primary audio provider for The Caverns and was brought in to supply the new Caverns Amphitheater—as the grassy hillside overlooking scenic Payne Cove is now known—with a sound reinforcement system for the four-time Grammy Award-winning artist’s shows, which ran from October 8 to 11. In keeping with CDC and state guidance for large gatherings, audiences watched the gigs from socially distanced “pods”—roped off sections for two, four or six family members or friends—which were at least six feet from each other and 15 feet from the stage. According to Sound Image system tech Chris Demonbreun, the main PA featured left and right hangs of four L-Acoustics K1 enclosures over five K2, with two Kudo cabinets positioned below as frontfills. Two additional ground-stacked K2 were deployed off stage right to address a few of the audience pods not covered by the main arrays. Four groups of three vertically-oriented SB28 subs, each set up in cardioid mode, “kept the low end off of the stage and did some delay steering to maintain smooth low-end coverage throughout the listening area,” he says. The entire system was powered by 15 LA8 amplified controllers located under the stage, driven with AES and analog fallback, while an L-Acoustics P1 processor at FOH provided system processing and control. Demonbreun points to Danny Poland, production manager for The Caverns, as the final decision-maker to use L-Acoustics, “which is always a great idea, in my opinion,” he concurs. “With approximately 750 people each night spread out across the hillside seating, which is 200 feet wide and 400 feet deep, Danny knew that we would be able to get full audience coverage with K1/K2, and that it would sound great.” Cain Hogsed, the band’s FOH engineer, agrees: “Although we typically use existing venue or local PA when touring, L-Acoustics is one of the more common systems we see, and I’m always thankful for it. I’ve enjoyed mixing on K2 and V-DOSC rigs in the past, so when I was told we were going to be on K2 for these shows, I knew we would have plenty of coverage and clarity, and we certainly did.” With all four shows being outdoors, Hogsed notes that weather conditions are always a potential challenge. “Having to deal with wind and rain, my experience was different every night,” he says. “During the second and third shows, I was actually mixing under a tarp while Chris, my system tech, held visqueen over the console. Thankfully, even though the weather was highly unpredictable, the L-Acoustics PA was consistent and balanced.” Aside from praising Hogsed for his “killer mix every night,” Demonbreun chalks up a good part of the system’s success to the resources found in Soundvision. “I believe that this system did better than other competitive PAs would have done thanks to the use of new L-Acoustics autosolver tools like Autofilter and Autoclimate,” he describes. “They allowed me to make sure that the people in the front didn’t get blasted with high end while still allowing those in the back to hear nice, clear, full-range audio. It sounded nearly the same everywhere, within 4dB from the front to the back, which is something that L-Acoustics makes it easy to do.” The Caverns’ general manager, Joe Lurgio, was duly impressed with the results as well. “Personally, I was told repeatedly by the artist team, who were both behind the scenes and in the audience, that they were blown away by the audio—especially for a brand-new venue,” he says. “Without having a dress rehearsal, we were nervous that we might have undersized the rig, but it sounded great from everywhere in the ‘house.’ The amphitheater is a natural bowl shape and allowed for the sound to hit everyone, and Sound Image really delivered with the right loudspeaker setup for these shows. We can’t wait to do more.” Nashville Scene also chimed in on the audio with an article on the final show, which read: “Isbell’s voice was smooth, naturalistic and in fine form Sunday, never having to strain to be heard. For an outdoor space, everything sounded crisp and condensed. That was no small feat…” One dollar from all ticket sales was donated to NIVA, the National Independent Venue Association, to benefit music venues currently closed because of the pandemic. Learn more about NIVA at SaveOurStages.com. For more info on The Caverns, visit www.thecaverns.com. Sound Image can likewise be found online at www.sound-image.com.last_img read more

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Uncommon customer experience

first_img 35SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Myles Bristowe Myles brings 20 years of executive leadership and practical innovation in the disciplines of digital, mobile, social media and integrated marketing. He leads the Make Your Money Matter movement for … Web: www.pscu.com Details My mother used to say, “Experience is what you get when you don’t get what you want.”The greatest of marketing masters will tell you they’ve earned their stripes by learning from their biggest mistakes. At least that’s what the honest ones will tell you. As marketers who must measure the metrics, we don’t always get the results we want, so we learn our lessons and become a little smarter each time for the next.  We take big leaps of faith, and try crazy ideas in order to stand out above the rest.  When these ideas work, we become heroes. When our leaps result in belly flops, we become smarter – except of course, when we don’t.Either way, every mistake is a gift bestowed upon you. These learning events are gifts for which you pay dearly, but they also bring us lessons one could never buy.Today’s consideration, however, is not about you, your mistakes, or the vast experience you may have accumulated throughout your career. No. Today is about the experience your prospects are gaining.Unfortunately, learning from mistakes is also true for consumers. Every prospect you capture has been someone else’s customer, and at some point in time, they did not get what they want. Otherwise, they would still be loyal customers of your competition. In fact, they were probably disappointed enough times, by enough other brands, that they have since become fully skeptical of your company and hesitant to trust your marketing. All they really want to get is what they are promised. In fact, they want you to want to give them what they are promised too. So, there is only one thing to do.Keep your promises!Good companies look to eliminate risks, break down barriers, create immediacy and so their marketers sweeten the deal with better pricing. Meanwhile, consumers instinctively assume the fine print of the special offers is somehow concealing a hidden “catch.”Better companies know their prospects are skeptical, and so they work hard to prove their credibility. Meanwhile, prospects suspect that the testimonials posted on the website are staged and scripted.The marketplace is loaded with “step right up” incentives targeted at prospects that distrust these offers and do their best to stay at arm’s length. The more prospects build walls and try to keep their distance, the harder marketers are working to convince them. When you’ve tried those tactics, you’ll find that nothing speaks louder than good performance.The best companies are uncommonly committed to keeping their word and delivering on their marketing promises. They are working to manage advocacy programs rather than scrambling to kick off another race-to-the-bottom price slashing sale or spending their time trying to triage another PR crisis.Finally, when your prospects choose to trust you and become your customer, it is your ultimate mission to give them exactly what you promised. When you do, you create a new experience for your customers unlike most relationships they’ve encountered before.last_img read more

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Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year nominations sought

first_imgConsumer Protection Lawyer of the Year nominations sought March 15, 2015 Regular News Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year nominations sought W hen consumers are harassed by debt collectors, underwater on their mortgages, or trying to re-establish credit, they turn to attorneys practicing consumer law. For families fighting to right their economic ships, these attorneys are the life-saving captains.For the fifth year, the Consumer Protection Law Committee is accepting nominations for an award that acknowledges a Florida consumer law practitioner for outstanding efforts that benefit not only Floridians but the practice of consumer law.First presented in 2011, the Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year award recognizes excellence, character, and commitment to the practice of consumer protection law. The nomination form is available on the committee’s Florida Bar website. Nominations should explain how the nominee:* Promotes the ideals and values of consumer protection and advocacy.* Participates in notable projects or activities advancing consumer law.* Demonstrates exemplary professionalism, excellence, character, and commitment to consumer protection.Deadline fornominations for the 2015 Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year Award is Friday, April 10. For more information contact Susannah Lyle at slyle@flabar.org or 850-561-5669.last_img read more

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Brain scan research shows that lack of sleep severely alters brain function

first_imgSleep deprivation majorly impacts the brain’s connectivity and function, according to a recent study published this February in NeuroImage. As well as affecting many important networks, sleep deprivation prevented normal changes to brain function between the morning and evening.Sleep is an essential human state which is necessary for maintaining healthy function throughout the body. Therefore, lack of sleep has severe health-related consequences, with the brain being the most affected organ.Lack of sleep can negatively affect memory, emotional processing and attentional capacities. For example, sleep deprivation has been shown to disrupt functional connectivity in hippocampal circuits (important for memory), and between the amygdala (important for emotion regulation) and executive control regions (involved in processes such as attention, planning, reasoning and cognitive flexibility). The emotional effects of sleep deprivation can be to both alter response patterns to negative things but also enhance reactivity toward positive things. LinkedIn Share on Twitter Pinterest Emailcenter_img Share on Facebook Share The study, led by Tobias Kaufmann of University of Oslo, involved 60 young men who completed three resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans – this is used to evaluate connectivity between brain regions when a person is not performing a task.They were scanned in the morning and evening of the same day – this was to account for changes from morning to evening in normal brain function (diurnal variability). 41 men then underwent total sleep deprivation, whereas the remainder had another night of regular sleep, before they were scanned again the following morning. Finally, behavioural assessments of vigilance and visual attention were assessed.The findings revealed that sleep deprivation strongly altered the connectivity of many resting-state networks; most clearly affected were networks important for memory (hippocampal networks) and attention (dorsal attention networks), as well as the default mode network (an interconnected set of brain regions active when a person is daydreaming or their mind is wandering).In fact, they identified a set of 17 brain network connections showing altered brain connectivity. Furthermore, correlation analysis suggested that morning-to-evening connectivity changes returned the next day in the group that had slept the night, but not in the sleep-deprivation group.The study emphasizes the major impact of sleep deprivation on the brain’s connectivity and function, as well as providing evidence that normal morning-to-evening connectivity changes do not occur after a night without sleep.last_img read more

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Network Rail property head signals wave of development

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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April 10 Update – two news cases

first_img You may be interested in… CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 16, 2020 OPM, St. Johns, Antigua and Barbuda – The most recent results received by the Ministry of Health Wellness and the Environment from the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) revealed two new laboratory confirmed cases of COVID-19. This brings the total number of persons with the disease in Antigua and Barbuda to 21. The other four samples were negative for COVID-19. Of note is that these two new cases are health care workers. The Ministry of Health Wellness and the Environment is taking all necessary measures to protect all health care workers involved in the nation’s fight against COVID-19. These include ensuring personal protective equipment (PPE) is readily available and that persons are adequately trained in their appropriate use. Oct 16, 2020 Today, persons who were quarantined at the Hawksbill Hotel were released from quarantine. Unfortunately, one gentleman, after being released, had to be rushed to the Mount St. John Medical Center. Despite resuscitative efforts he passed away. While in quarantine he did not develop any COVID-19 symptoms. The Ministry of Health Wellness and the Environment extends condolences to the family of the deceased. Oct 16, 2020center_img CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 15, 2020 Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols Earlier today, an additional 14 samples were sent to the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) in Trinidad. Members of the public will be advised of these results as soon as they become available. The Ministry of Health Wellness and the Environment thanks the public for cooperating with the measures associated with the State of Emergency. These measures along with social distancing, proper cough and sneeze etiquette, hand washing and sanitizing are crucial in our nation’s fight against COVID-19. 12 April updateThe most recent results received by the Ministry of Health Wellness and the Environment from the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) revealed twonew laboratory confirmed cases of COVID-19. This brings the total number of persons with laboratory confirmation of the disease in Antigua and Barbuda to 23. The other twelve…April 13, 2020In “General”Antigua to test all passengers for COVID-19 on arrivalST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) — The Antigua and Barbuda government says every person entering the country will need to be tested and will undergo mandatory quarantine, after the island recorded 39 cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19) from individuals who recently arrived in the country. Officials say all 39 had been…June 26, 2020In “General”Saint Lucia Reports 100 Percent Recovery Of COVID-19 Cases Ministry of Health, Castries – As of April 21, 2020 the WHO reported a total of 2, 397, 217 confirmed cases of COVID-19 globally with 162, 956 deaths. There are now 893, 119 confirmed cases in the region of the Americas. The affected region includes Dominican Republic (4,964), Haiti (47),…April 22, 2020In “Featured”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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