Missouri jail’s nurse allegedly poisoned husband to marry inmate

first_imgMiller County, Missouri Sheriff’s Office(COLUMBIA, Mo.) — Police charged a jail nurse in Missouri with murder after she allegedly poisoned her husband and tried to cover it up by setting their home on fire — all in a bid to marry an inmate.Amy Murray was arrested on Thursday in connection with the December death of her husband, Joshua Murray, who she allegedly set on fire and poisoned with antifreeze, according to a probable cause statement.She allegedly set the couple’s bedroom on fire and left with her 11-year-old son and dogs to go to McDonald’s, according to the statement. As an alibi, Murray said she found the house on fire when she returned and the smoke was too heavy for her to go inside, according to a probable cause statement.Police said the fire was set intentionally and autopsy results indicated that Joshua Murray died before the fire began, according to the Miller County Sheriff’s Office.Miller County Sheriff Louie Gregoire said they didn’t believe the suspect’s story.“It looked suspicious. The sheriff’s office detectives came in with the fire marshal’s office department and started investigating it and continued from their,” Gregoire told Columbia ABC affiliate KMIZ-TV. “Basically what held up is we were waiting for the autopsy report.”After investigating the incident, police discovered that Amy Murray, a nurse at a correctional center in Jefferson City, Missouri, had an intimate relationship with an inmate, who she planned to marry, according to recorded phone conversations.“During the phone calls, Amy Murray talks about not wanting to be around her husband, Joshua Murray, and was wanting a divorce from him,” the probable cause statement. “Amy Murray talks about wanting Joshua Murray to come home from Nebraska and she is tired of being around him.”She also mentioned that the two could now get married because her husband was dead, the statement said.The Miller County Sheriff’s Office charged Amy Murray with first-degree murder, second-degree arson, tampering with physical evidence and armed criminal action. She was released on a $750,000 bond from the Miller County Adult Detention Center in Tuscumbia, Missouri. She’s scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 13.Her attorney did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reservedlast_img read more

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Joe Gibbs Racing No. 20 fails pre-qualifying inspection twice at Texas; car chief ejected

first_imgThe No. 20 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota for driver Erik Jones failed on two attempts through the inspection line before Friday’s Busch Pole Qualifying for the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series at Texas Motor Speedway.As a result, NASCAR officials ejected car chief Jason Overstreet from the No. 20 team’s 12-person road crew. The team was also penalized with a 15-minute deduction of practice time, which will be enforced in Saturday’s final practice at the 1.5-mile track.RELATED: Full schedule for TexasAfter starting the season with two consecutive top-10 finishes, Jones has absorbed four straight finishes of 13th or worse. He’s set to make his sixth Texas start in this Sunday’s O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (3 p.m. ET, FOX, PRN, SiriusXM).Jones has three Texas victories in the NASCAR Xfinity Series and one in the Gander Outdoors Truck Series.last_img read more

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EMS Overtime Called Into Question

first_imgAt EMS, one issue being addressed is overtime.Click here for the full story. LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Imagine doubling your income by working overtime at your same job. At one city agency, some workers are racking up thousands of dollars in extra pay. Leaders at Metro Emergency Medical Services, like all city agencies, have been asked to cut their expenses due to a tax revenue shortfall.last_img

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Bike Ride Memorializes Fallen EMS

first_imgWe had good road and I, as a three-time rider, was really appreciating the hard work of the route coordinators. They were fantastic. The first section of today’s route seems to pass quickly and then it was on to”žSperryville,”žVa., which would be the staging point for our assault on”žSkyline Drive. This evening was dedicated to registering all the riders and giving us a chance to get acquainted. Dave Page, our vice president, spent the afternoon orientating new and old riders on the different aspects of the ride, along with some basic safety rules. We’d already had the discussion of someone saying “I’m just support” with the reply that nope, there is no “just”. As anyone who has done the ride can tell you, the Wingmen are the heart and soul of the ride.”ž Despite some rain this evening and a chance of rain tomorrow, spirits were high and the group was excited to get on the road. May 21This was the first day we didn’t have any events or memorial services scheduled. We would be riding in touring format, which means riders can ride at their own pace. Touring is nice because it really gives the riders a chance to reflect on the reason each of them is riding and the people they’re riding for. Thanks to the support team. The ‘Wingmen’ are the true heroes of the ride, ensuring that we’re safe, fed and hydrated. They got up earlier than the bikers to mark the routes and went to bed later as they finalized plans for the next day. They loaded and unloaded bikes and luggage and were always there with a smile, high-five or words of encouragement. May 20We have experienced some setbacks. It was raining and we had to abort at least the morning portion of the ride. Weather problems were to be expected and at this point were the least of our problems. The team finally wound up at the Brooklyn Navy Yard where we boarded FDNY Marine 9 for a trip past the Statue of Liberty and the USS Intrepid to”žStaten Island. On”žStaten Island, we were met by the FDNY EMS Pipes and Drums. They piped us back to shore, and we broke for lunch. This was our “easy” day because we only had to ride about 65 miles with just a couple of long climbs. This included many hills. However, after”žSkyline Drive, you find you have a whole new perspective on what constitutes a tough hill! We spent the morning enjoying the mild weather, rolling hills and great scenery. The first rest stop this day was at Natural Bridge Volunteer FD, followed by stops in Buchanan and Troutville. Thank you to our sponsors who allowed us to make this important journey. A right turn out of the station and the climb began. Every turn we took revealed yet another incline. And another. And another. When it was all said and done, the team had done 12 miles of climbing to the Skyland Resort at an elevation of 3,680 feet. Although this was a very beautiful ride, the climbing was extremely challenging from a physical and mental standpoint. One of the other nice things about this day was the route. The route coordinators did a fantastic job as usual. The roads were smooth and not heavily traveled, and great scenery abounded. Our muscles warmed up quickly, as did the day. Although some people may get to see”žTimes Square in their lifetime, few will ever see it on a bicycle under police escort. As such all of the riders — especially the first-timers — certainly enjoyed this combination first-leg/guided tour of the city. It was impressive seeing the big blue train in all its glory rolling into”žRoanoke. It was only nine miles to our destination. But it seemed like a much shorter ride as we talked and joked, and as our anticipation built. We arrived in Elkton for a food fill up and to talk with the local media. Then it was off to the Shenandoah Airport for our lunch date with Air Care. The crew was called out on a mission, so we had to eat without them. We’d need all that fuel because the last leg of the day was 40 miles of rolling Virginia hills (which I personally love). But it included another 10-20 mph head wind (which I personally hateÚa lot!) The route was long and the riders very much spread out, but the Wingmen did their usual good job of keeping tabs and helping ensure the riders’ safety. At 1700 on the dot, the full Muddy Angels team began making its way to”žRoanoke. But if the first six days were filled with challenges from our celestial preceptors, then Day 7 was a gift from them — a reward for all the group’s effort and perseverance. The weather was stunningly perfect for a long-distance ride, with comfortable temperatures, smooth roads and none of the vicious head wind we had been fighting the past three days. It was also a gift for the families who would be in front of the Hotel Roanoke to greet us. Thank you to the families who held us in”žRoanoke and told us their stories. We came to support you and are humbled by how much you supported us. We share your pain and promise your loved ones will not be forgotten. The big event for this day was in”žAnnapolis,”žMd. at the Maryland Fire-Rescue Memorial. Once again we received a warm reception and attended a powerful ceremony. After the memorial service, we received an unexpected surprise when our president, Jennifer Frenette was presented with a”žMaryland state flag that had flown over their Statehouse. Once again we were humbled and strengthened by the appreciation others had for our efforts. So what happened from here? Simple, we rode on even more determined than ever. We fully intended to honor those promises and frankly, it would have taken a lot more than a petty thief to stop us. Thank you to all of the rescue squads along the way. You were all life savers, offering an oasis of Gatorade and Powerbars that would carry us to the next stop. Many of you even helped with repairs to vehicles! We certainly appreciate the help and support, and it’s important that you”ž”ž realize that you’re as much a part of the Muddy Angels team as anyone else. The team had been through a lot this past week. We started behind the eight-ball when several people promising to help provide support failed to show. From there we had a support vehicle get struck by a drunk driver, ran into torrential rains out of Philly, were robbed in”žAnnapolis, had a support vehicle strike a bear and were raided by raccoons. The evening ended with the Fairfield Rescue Squad, who served us a fabulous fried chicken dinner with all the fixins! We also discussed plans for the next day. The group left fat and happy, as usual. The weather was great. However, we would once again be fighting a headwind blowing anywhere from 10-20 mph. At Capitol Heights FD, we attended a nice ceremony to honor Nadar Hammet, who was killed in December 2003. The department chaplain and Nadar’s mother gave very moving speeches, and we were honored to have Nadar’s brother, Faheen, ride with us and lead the team into the nation’s capital. May 17Saturday started off cool and breezy, with 57 riders showing up for the ride. We were still in “meet-n-greet” mode, getting further chance to get acquainted on the bus ride over to the Jacobi station. Once at Jacobi we received coffee, well wishes and a benediction from the Fire Department New York (FDNY) chaplain. Sperryville gave us a great spot to relax and refuel before the “real” climbing began. What!?! Hadn’t we been climbing since about 7 that morning? According to these folks, apparently not. And we were about to learn just how right they were. A big thank you to all who came out and willingly hugged a bunch of grimy, sweaty, smelly cyclists. May 23On Day 7, the riders woke to a beautiful”žVirginia morning. The sun was out and the air crisp. Spirits were high, and everyone was anxious to fulfill our mission, even if it meant that we would soon be parting ways. After giving our best to the families, we were back on the road and en route to meet the Philadelphia Police Department, who would be escorting us into the City of”žBrotherly Love. I’ve got to say that it’s nice to these large cities without stopping for red lights and stop signs. We finally arrived in”žFranklin Square for snacks and a welcome from Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Ayers and Chief Butts. I personally found the trip to Sperryville to be very picturesque and relaxing. We encountered very little traffic on these roads, and it really gave me — and I’m sure others — a chance to clear my mind and enjoy some world-class cycling. There were lots of climbs and very few flat or downhill sections to recover. More than once I asked those who had passed to clear some lactic acid from my legs or at least do something about the wind. We woke this morning to find that the windows of some of the support vehicles had been smashed, and items were stolen from the vehicles. Although you would think this would be demoralizing, it had the opposite effect. You see, we had a mission. We made a promise to honor those who died in the line of duty. We promised the families that their loved ones would NOT be forgotten. We promised all EMS providers that we would be relentless in our efforts to ensure EMS providers and their families are afforded the same protection as police and firefighters, and that proper attention is devoted to identifying and tracking safety and line of duty deaths in”žEMS. Of course, these are”žEMS providers we’re talking about. So I rather than give me a tail wind, they decided to chuckle and enjoying the show. Interestingly enough though when I arrived in Sperryville, I was informed that I had beaten the support team! They had actually helped somehow, but darn if I can figure out how. Finally, thank you to the fallen. You selflessly gave your all to help others and you continue to help others through your legacies. Your families miss you but are also very proud of the way you lived your lives, and I know that you’re just as proud of them. And thanks for having our back! Rested and well-fed we were off once again, this time to Perth-Amboy, N.J. for a special ceremony thanking the team, but more importantly honoring fallen EMS providers. This included their own Joe Murawski. It’s interesting so many people came out to thank us for what we do. Although we love the emotional support, we always like to reinforce that we aren’t the ones who should be honored. I like to tell people that we’re more like flashlight helping to illuminate the lives of those we’ve lost so that they are never forgotten. May 16″ž It was Friday evening, and the riders for the New York National EMS Memorial Bike Ride were trickling in. What first caught my eye were the fluorescent yellow shirts of the Muddy Angel Wingmen and women. It was the first time I had seen the shirts before, and honestly the design is pretty sweet.”žcenter_img Nothing happened. But eventually our hard work paid off, and we were able to enjoy a descent lasting several miles. The winding road with its banked corners and speeds of 40 mph and up made it an exhilarating ride. I was just praying that one of the numerous deer we had seen earlier that morning didn’t run out in from of me. That wouldn’t have been pretty! Did I mention we’re talking about EMSers? 🙂 Our first stop of the day was in”žBucks County,”žPa., the site of the third plane lost during the 9/11 attacks. Bucks Country has a gorgeous memorial called the”žGarden of”žReflection. It honors all lives lost in during 9/11 as well as being their”žEMS memorial. Here we attended another very nice yet heart-wrenching memorial service that honored providers lost in”žBucks”žCounty. It included a reading of names by the student honor guard from”žInvers”žHill”žCommunity College. Once again, family was in attendance, and their tears were joined by those of the bike team members. The ceremony gets underway and far too many state flags file past. Introductions are made followed by some beautiful singing and a keynote speech. Then it’s on to the honorees. This is always an emotional time for me and everyone around me. It’s hard not to get choked up when you watch brave children or heartbroken parents step up on the platform to accept their flag. Our area is filled with “tough””žEMS providers sniffing and unashamedly wiping away tears. After all, these are the people we rode for and, although we met many of the families just a day ago, the love and appreciation that they showed us on Friday makes us feel like a part of their family. And in a sense we are. It seemed odd someone can feel profoundly sad and yet energized at the same moment, but as we’re finding out, these ceremonies have just that effect. At this time, I’d choose not to say good-bye, but “thanks” Our destination of”žRoanoke was about 60 miles away, and the team was eager to get there but certainly not for this adventure to end. This year’s group bonded quickly and tightly, and we knew it would be hard to say good-bye. The memorial service is a sea of uniforms, from class-As to flight suits. We move into the church and I’m struck by the number of pews that have been reserved for family members. Logically I understand 73 is a lot of people, but here I can actually get a physical sense of that number. In fact, almost the entire downstairs is for family, so the bike team files up to stadium-like seating on the right side of the sanctuary. Undaunted, the team left Skyland early to begin the 107-mile trek to”žLexington. It was cool — very cool — and riders were bundled up for what we thought would be a long, rapid descent. If you know”žSkyline Drive, you’ll appreciate that parts of it seemed to have been designed by M.C. Esher. Our trip “down” included two climbs, approximately a mile each along with several shorter climbs. Huh? How does that work? Through it all the riders kept riding, and the support team simply (or so it seemed) adapted and enabled us to continue. Personally, I viewed all these incidents as evidence of the fallen watching over us. After all, these are the same souls that, in their time on Earth, would put KY Jelly on door handles or flip switches so that the lights and sirens would blare as soon as you hit the battery switch. Just because they’re no longer with us doesn’t mean they don’t still enjoy a good prank! Until we meet again, stay safe everyoneÚ. May 22We woke this morning to find one of the vans had been broken into, and a lot of food was missing. However, this time the dirty work appeared to have been done by raccoons. At this point I was beginning to realize how much our fallen comrades enjoy pranks. We can do nothing but laugh — we get the joke! When we arrived at the Capitol Heights Volunteer Fire Department, not only was the rain stopping but the media jumped on the story about us getting robbed. A local glass company, Royal Glass Co., stepped up and repaired the broken windows that morning free of charge! Monetary support came as well, with the overwhelming majority coming out of”žNew Hampshire thanks to a lot of hard work from Bureau of EMS’s Chief Suzanne Prentiss and her staff. Thank a lot to all who helped us out! The day that started with a setback is turning out to be one of progress! By the time the ceremony ended it had begun raining. Most of the riders decided to press on, but before long the light rain had become steady, quickly progressing to torrential. In order to ensure the safety of the riders the course was closed and the wet riders were rounded up and taken to the hotel so that they could clean up and get some food. Plenty of more riding is ahead, and we wanted to make sure everyone was able to ride into”žRoanoke. The team was led through the streets of New York by New York Police Department (NYPD) motorcycles and assisted by two motorcyclists from the”žAustin,”žTexas team. While I was originally curious as to how much the motorcyclists could help us, I quickly saw them used as “force multipliers” by the NYPD, taking over the blocking of intersections so that the police bikes could speed ahead to the next. Saturday is free time for the team members to do as they please. Though not specifically invited, I decide to sneak into the Memorial Service’s “Meet and Greet” so I can hopefully meet a family member I was unable to locate on Friday. Some partake of the art festival in town, while others decide to relax near the pool. One of the common questions we get from the people who greet us in”žRoanoke is, “Aren’t you tired?” The answer is always “No”. This is my third year riding, and I can tell you the response we get from the families makes us want to pick up our bikes and ride another 600 miles — just for them. Thanks to the other riders. You guys and gals looked out for each other on the road and pushed through wind, rain and seemingly endless hills. Though your legs screamed with pain and you knew you could stop at any time, you didn’t. And for that, each and every one of you should be proud. There was another ceremony and memorial. Because of the emotional nature of each of the ceremonies we’ve attended, some of the riders have been heard to joke “I’m going to be a wreck by the time we hit”žRoanoke.” True enough because these memorials aren’t just because “it’s the right thing to do,” rather because these communities have lost friends or family. These aren’t just speeches. You can FEEL that these folks miss those who have passed, are proud of the person’s service and touched that they aren’t forgotten. And all of the emotions come through loud and clear to everyone in attendance. In D.C. we got a nice little escort from D.C. police and Capitol Heights FD. As we rode in, the capital began to rise out of the horizon along with the many other historic buildings. We came to a stop at the”žUpper Senate Park to meet with representatives for Advocates for EMS announcing support for bill 3822 that would include”žall“žEMS providers in the public safety officer death benefit program. Many of us paid a visit to our Senator’s office to ask for their support for the bill. May 19This was a great day of riding if not a little windy. OK, a”žLOT windy. The wind almost never got below 10 mph and was blowing 20-30 for most of the day. Toss in fairly regular 40-45 mph gusts and the fact that it was all head or cross wind, and you’ve got the ingredients for a hard day of riding. On the bright side, though, a windy day is a great way to impress upon less experienced riders the importance of learning to draft. All over the course we had experienced riders leading out for the newer ones and giving them pointers on conserving energy and riding efficiently. At 5 p.m., we start making our way to the church for the Memorial Service. As we’re getting ready to leave we find out that the mother of one of the honorees is stranded. She’s wheelchair bound; the bus hired by the Memorial Service is unable to take her and no other arrangements have been made — not cool. But, being EMTs and Paramedics, we’re programmed to help and we’ll be damned if we’re going to allow a family member to miss this service. Without hesitation, Steve Berry hops out of the car and gives the woman his seat. Her wheelchair is placed in a FDNY van, and in minutes we’re off to the church. Once again I am reminded why I’m so proud of this bike team. May 25Sunday. Bags are packed, and vehicles are being loaded. But there’s always time for another hug, another good-bye. As a veteran, I can tell you we’re always close by the end of the ride. But this year was different. This year the group gelled into a team so quickly that it boggles the mind. It’s hard to believe the majority of people didn’t know each other at all this past Friday because at this point we feel like one big family. When we turned the last corner and rolled into the reception area, the team was shocked by the size of the crowd on hand to greet us. They gave us warm reception and applause as the team rode into the turn-around a couple times before dropping their bikes. Tears were already flowing from bikers and guests as we congratulated each other and set off to find the family members we had ridden for. Nothing but NOTHING can describe the feeling of that day. Family members, friends and co-workers would thank us for riding and we would thank them for allowing us to honor their loved ones. Tears and hugs were the order of the day, and we tried to make the most of our time with the families before settling in and getting cleaned up. May 18After what seemed like a short night, the team was up bright and early. Everyone seemed to be feeling the first day of riding in one form or another. But after some fruit, bagels and coffee, we were ready to hit the open road. It was another beautiful day for ridingÚwell, maybe a beautiful morning for riding is a better description, but more on that later. From there, we had a stop at”žGeorge”žWashington”žUniversity before making our way to”žManassas,”žVa. This portion of this day’s ride gave us a nice taste of the”žVirginia hills. There would be plenty more where that came from in the days ahead. By 2:30 p.m. all the N.Y. riders were in”žSalem, and a large number group of riders went out to meet the incoming”žKentucky riders. It was great seeing the”žKentucky riders cycling down the road. We exchanged congratulations and all went back to the Salem Rescue Squad.”ž After hearing the recollections of Joe’s friends and family at Perth-Amboy, the team left with a huge lump in our throats but re-energized so the final miles to”žPlainsboro,”žN.J. passed by easily. It was a very moving ceremony that included Joe’s family’s presence and an excellent tribute from his brother, Ed. Kudos to all of the folks in Perth-Amboy because this would be the most well-attended tribute we would see all week. May 24It’s Saturday, and something is missing. It feels strange not to be waking up and hopping on a bike. There are some members of the team down in the lobby, drinking coffee, while others are getting breakfast. Everyone I meet is in a great mood but also shares the same sadness that we aren’t outside abusing our bodies this morning. Of course, others are doing just that by riding their bikes up the long hill to visit the large star that overlooks”žRoanoke. Coffee and breakfast sounds just fine to me. Doug Martin”ž is the webmaster for the”žNational EMS Memorial Bike Ride.last_img read more

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Corey Slovis Presents on Practice Changing EMS Articles at EMS Today 2015

first_img EMS ECGs showing a STEMI may resolve by ED entry. Slovis touched on the most important articles over the past 12 months, as well as the practice changing concepts, changes in the standard of care and important new facts for EMTs and paramedics to focus on. Corey Slovis, MD, is the medical director of the Nashville Fire Department. He also chairs the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and is on the editorial board of JEMS. He’s a well-known nationally renowned educator and focused his talk on potentially practice changing articles that EMS providers should be familiar with. Epinephrine may not be effective in CPR. Key points from articles he discussed were: Data showing hands on defibrillation is dangerous may be flawed. BLS may be superior to ALS in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Beta blockers for AMI may be indicated again in acute STEMI. The role of TXA in EMS continues to both evolve and be re-evaluated.last_img read more

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We May Soon Be Able to Power Our Smartphones With Single-Use Plastic Bags

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreInstead of ending up in a landfill, the plastic used in grocery bags may soon be powering our smartphones, according to new research.Scientists from Purdue University have developed a procedure that converts the plastic into the carbon chips that are found in lithium batteries used to power portable electronics, toys, and medical devices.The technique could solve the plastic recycling crisis while simultaneously boosting production of lithium batteries, which are being used in everything from chainsaws to electric cars with a growth rate that may soon cause shortages or price spikes. Experts have long suspected polyethylene in plastic bags could be a cheap source of energy-storing carbon, but their previous attempts at conversion have either failed or required processes that are too expensive or complex.LOOK: Origami-Inspired Solar Panel Could Start Generating Renewable Electricity From Your WindowAccording to research published in ACS Omega by Dr. Vilas Pol, a chemical engineer at the Indiana university, the problem has been solved with a simple and more efficient approach.Pol and his colleagues say they have developed a method that creates carbon chips that can be used as anodes, which are typically made of graphite and serve as the negative electrodes used in these rechargeable batteries.MORE: We May Soon Be Building Houses Out of the Byproducts From Bathroom WasteThe team immersed polyethylene plastic bags into sulphuric acid and sealed them inside a chemical reactor. This heated the plastic to just below the melting temperature of around 150 degrees centigrade.Dr Pol said: “This treatment caused sulphonic acid groups to be added so the plastic could be heated to a much higher temperature without vaporizing into hazardous gases.”CHECK OUT: Surgeons Implant World’s First 3D-Printed Rib, and it Was Huge SuccessWhen they removed the sulphonated polyethylene from the reactor and heated it in a furnace in an inert atmosphere, it became pure carbon. The researchers then ground the carbon into a black powder and used it to make lithium battery anodes.“Many plastic bags are used only once and then disposed, ending up in landfills, oceans and elsewhere in the environment, where they can take hundreds of years to decompose,” Pol said. “Globally, around 300 million tons of plastic were produced in 2013 to fulfill the growing demand.LOOK: Scientists Are Replacing Plastic With Algae—and Sucking Carbon Out of the Air“This novel upcycling approach totally gets rid of low and high density waste plastic bags by converting them into functional carbonaceous materials.”SHARE This Glorious Good News To Green Your Social Media Feed…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Thomas Cook Ironman 70.3 Mallorca

first_imgThe inaugural Thomas Cook Ironman 70.3 Mallorca will take place on the island of Mallorca on 14 May 2011. The Spanish island, known as a training paradise to many cyclists and triathletes, will host a qualifying race for the Ironman 70.3 World Championship for the first time. The host city of Alcudia is located in the north of the island and offers ideal conditions for the race.Sponsored by holiday operator Thomas Cook, the new event will be the first race of the 2011 European Ironman 70.3 race season, where athletes can test their form in mild temperatures.Kai Walter, Managing Director of Ironman European Headquarters, said, “We, together with our title sponsor and strong partner Thomas Cook, are looking forward to welcoming many athletes to the season kick-off on Mallorca.“With the swim in the Mediterranean Sea, the beautiful landscape of the bike course and the spectator-friendly run course through the inner-city of Alcudia, the Thomas Cook Ironman 70.3 Mallorca offers ideal conditions for another highlight in the European Ironman 70.3 race calendar.”Michael Tenzer, CEO Tourism at Thomas Cook AG, said, “Mallorca is, and always will be, one of the most popular travel destinations for German tourists in the Mediterranean Sea. We are glad to place another highlight with our Ironman 70.3 race.“Our travel operator, Neckermann Reisen, is leading in the market with his catalogue for sports travel. The trend sport, triathlon, is perfect for our programme and Ironman 70.3 is a top event, both for tourism and for sports.”Opening of registration and race course maps of the Thomas Cook Ironman 70.3 Mallorca event will be published in September.www.ironman703-mallorca.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Cross Duathlon Championships round off new look Triathlon England National Champs

first_img Related The Essex Off Road Duathlon, the seventh and final event of the new look 2013 Triathlon England – National Championships, will be taking place on 27 October at Hylands Park, Chelmsford, Essex, with the first ever English Club Duathlon title to fight for.Up to 500 people have entered the race, which will kick off with a 3.5K run, followed by a 14K bike ride and finishing off with a 3K run.Over the past year, Triathlon England notes that interest in multisport has increased dramatically and more women in particular are getting involved and ‘giving it a tri’ for themselves. In 2012, over 700 triathlons, duathlons and aquathlons took place in England, seeing over 125,000 people competing in races and many of them for the first time.Jem Lawson, Chair of Triathlon England, said “It’s great news to see how interest in the sport is continuing to grow and we are excited to say that our 2013 Triathlon England – National Triathlon Championships is already proving very popular.“With previous events selling-out, it shows these events are growing, and we hope that this in turn will encourage many more to get involved. Our memberships have been increasing steadily and we hope the value we offer will inspire more to get involved.”Graham Lee, of race organiser Multi Sport Management, said “The new Championship series has provided members of Triathlon England key races to focus on throughout the year. This will be the first Cross Duathlon Championship with age group honours at stake, but the Essex Off-Road Duathlon ethos of inclusion remains the same; with this fun and friendly race welcoming both experienced athletes to complete newbies along to take part.“We tweak the route every year to keep it fresh and this year we have reversed the bike route, increasing the fun factor as well as now being 100% tarmac free.”The new Triathlon England Engagement Trailer will also be heading to the event. The 14-foot trailer, which is kitted out with its own PA system and digital media area, provides a state-of-the-art facility for race-goers to talk to experienced members of the national governing body on a range of issues.Triathlon England staff will be on hand all day and are hoping to receive valuable feedback about the membership benefits it provides and to discuss other new initiatives currently happening within the sport.Dues to the successes of 2012, the Triathlon England – National Championships have grown to seven races in 2013. Triathlon England supports the delivery of opportunities for everyone to achieve their personal triathlon challenges in a fun and safe environment.Triathlon England is the National Governing Body for managing the sport and recreation of triathlon in England, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. Members are affiliated to a region and can vote for their regional committee. There are nine regions, which correspond to the English regional government areas.Each region has a representative on the Council of Triathlon England, which appoints and supervises the controlling Management Board of Triathlon England.www.triathlonengland.orglast_img read more

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QSC Now Shipping Attero Tech Synapse D32Mi

first_imgThe QSC Attero Tech Synapse D32Mi networked audio interface is now shipping. QSC has also released a supporting update to uniFY Control Panel software. This newest model in the Synapse series of 1U rack-mount network audio interfaces provides 32 mic/line analog inputs with microphone preamps and Dante/AES67 connectivity, including up to 24-bit, 96 kHz analog-to-Dante conversion. The inputs are available as either terminal blocks or DB25 connections.The newest Synapse model offers front panel and network control of mic preamp gain, phantom power and muting. Easily-assignable front panel headphone volume control and source selection enable local input and Dante confidence monitoring at the rack position.The redundant SFP expansion combines with a fully redundant Dante interface to enable simplified networking infrastructure. In addition, the DM32Mi can also be interfaced to an additional Synapse family I/O device creating a complete digital snake solution and eliminating the need for additional switches. As with other many products in Attero Tech line, the Synapse D32Mi quickly integrates into the Q-SYS Ecosystem via its control plugin (available through the Q-SYS Designer Asset Manager within Q-SYS Designer Software) allowing for full device control.This shipping announcement comes in tandem with the release of unIFY v3.4.0 Control Panel software, device configuration and firmware update capabilities for the Synapse D32Mi and Axon C1 3rd Party Mode configuration.Here are all the specs.last_img read more

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Walmart breaks ground at Metrocenter

first_imgOfficials with Walmart, the City of Phoenix and Carlyle Development Group – along with area business leaders – were broke ground Wednesday for a new Walmart Supercenter. The project represents the single largest capital investment in Metrocenter Mall in decades.“Metrocenter Mall is a Phoenix icon that has served shoppers in this community for decades,” said Phoenix City Councilwoman Thelda Williams. “Together, this Walmart and City Council’s recent approval of a new development plan for Metrocenter symbolize re-investment and rebirth for this critical community asset.”Construction begins immediately on the approximately 148,000-square-foot store on the south side of Metrocenter Mall, near I-17 and Dunlap. The Supercenter will take shape on the site of the former Broadway building, which was recently demolished and had been vacant since 2006. The Walmart is slated to open in Spring 2017.“Those of us at Walmart are excited this project will both help us serve our customers better while playing an important role in the continued revitalization in the Phoenix landmark that is Metrocenter Mall,” said Paula Ginnett, a Walmart vice president and regional general manager. “This site is going to be buzzing with shoppers next year, and that’s a great thing – for the City of Phoenix, area businesses and Metrocenter Mall.”Metrocenter Mall opened in 1973 as the biggest shopping center in Arizona and one of the largest nationwide. Recent years saw Metrocenter challenged by the establishment of competing regional malls, changing shopping patterns and the Great Recession. Now, Metrocenter Mall owner Carlyle Development Group, the City of Phoenix and community leaders are intent on bringing new life to the area.In June, the Phoenix City Council unanimously approved a Planned United Development (PUD) application for 130 acres in and around Metrocenter Mall. The new zoning allows for multiple new uses, including office, senior housing, multifamily housing and healthcare. It also provides for increased height and density at the infill site.“Even in our early planning, the name ‘Walmart’ would come up regularly as a great fit for a mixed-use Metrocenter development,” said Warren Fink, COO of Carlyle Development Group. “With our new zoning, we’re now able to actively pursue that vision through the addition of elements like office, senior housing and medical uses. Walmart is a valued part of that mix, and a welcome addition to the neighborhood at large. We’re very pleased to celebrate their groundbreaking.”last_img read more

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