2014 U.S. Open facts and figures

first_imgPINEHURST, N.C. — Facts and figures for the 114th U.S. Open golf championship:  Dates: June 12-15. Site: Pinehurst No. 2. The course: This is considered the masterpiece of Donald Ross, who completed Pinehurst No. 2 in 1907 and continued to refine it until his death in 1948. It has hosted the U.S. Open in 1999 and 2005. Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw renovated No. 2 three years ago by restoring the native sandy areas that were prevalent in the 1930s and 1940s, meaning this U.S. Open effectively will have no rough. Instead, players will face lies in sandy areas covered with loose vegetation and wire brush plants. Length: 7,562 yards Par: 36-34-70 Cut: Top 60 and ties after 36 holes. Playoff (if necessary): 18 holes on June 16. Field: 156 players Purse: TBA ($8 million in 2013). Defending champion: Justin Rose. Last year: Rose won his first major championship, closing with an even-par 70 at Merion for a two-shot victory over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. He became the first Englishman in 43 years to win the U.S. Open, finishing at 1-over 281. Mickelson had the 54-hole lead and reclaimed the lead by holing out for eagle on the 10th hole. But he made bogey twice with a wedge in his hand and closed with a 74. It was his sixth runner-up finish in the U.S. Open. Last time at Pinehurst No. 2: Michael Campbell of New Zealand closed with a 1-under 69 for a two-shot victory over Tiger Woods. He finished at even-par 280 and became the first Kiwi since Bob Charles in the 1963 British Open to win a major. Woods missed an 8-foot birdie attempt on the 16th hole and three-putted from 25 feet on the 17th hole to fall back. It was only the second time he finished runner-up in a major. U.S. Open champions at Pinehurst No. 2: Payne Stewart (1999), Michael Campbell (2005). Let’s play two: The U.S. Women’s Open will be held the following week on Pinehurst No. 2, the first time the men’s and women’s Opens have been contested in consecutive weeks on the same golf course. Noteworthy: Gary Player is the only one to complete the career Grand Slam at the U.S. Open. Quoteworthy: ”Someone could put you in the perfect place off every tee and it’s still the hardest course you’ve ever played.” – Geoff Ogilvy on Pinehurst No. 2. Key statistic: Tiger Woods won 30 percent of the majors he played through the 2008 U.S. Open. Since then, he has not played in 25 percent of the majors due to injury. Woods is recovering from back surgery and is not playing the U.S. Open. Television (all times EDT): Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., ESPN. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., NBC Sports; 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., ESPN2; 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., ESPN. Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., ESPN. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., NBC Sports. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., ESPN. Saturday and Sunday, noon to 7:30 p.m., NBC Sports.last_img read more

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Feng wins LET Buick Championship in China

first_imgSHANGHAI – China’s Shanshan Feng won the Ladies European Tour’s Buick Championship by six strokes Sunday at Shanghai Qizhong Garden. Feng closed with a 2-under 70 in windy conditions to finish at 17-under 271. She’s projected to jump from fifth to fourth in the world ranking. ”I’m really honored to win my sponsor’s tournament,” Feng said. South Korea’s Hyeon So Kang was second after a 69.last_img

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Watney to sit out rest of season with ailing back

first_imgAUSTIN, Texas – A month break to let his back heal has turned into much longer for Nick Watney, who says he is done for the rest of the season. Watney, whose six PGA Tour victories include a World Golf Championship and a FedEx Cup playoff event, has a herniated disc in his lower back. He thought the best-case scenario would be to return toward the end of the Florida swing, except that it’s not getting better. ”I just don’t want it to turn into a chronic thing and have it every few years,” Watney said over the weekend from his home in Austin. ”I’m rehabbing. But I don’t want to have surgery, and that’s part of the reason I’m going to take the year off. I just want to rehab and get everything sorted out. ”I’ve never had to sit out this long, and so it stinks.” Watney has tried to stay busy at home. He has two children, 2 and 8 months, which occupies most of the time. Still, a small measure of boredom is creeping in. ”I’m changing a lot of diapers,” he said. ”I’m loving the basketball on all day. But it’s hard, because I like to do something active, but I don’t want to be too active. And I don’t want to get into the markets, because I’m not very good at it.” In the meantime, being out for two months already has made him lonely for PGA Tour life. He hopes to get out to the Dell Match Play for at least one day just to see some friends that he has missed, such as Bill Haas. ”I might come out Wednesday and see how it goes,” he said. ”I want to see some people, but I don’t want to bug them.” Watney last played in the Farmers Insurance Open the last week in January. He has not had a top 10 since the AT&T Byron Nelson in May.last_img read more

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Golf goes on, but Tiger saga won’t go away

first_imgDUBLIN, Ohio – Outside the clubhouse at Muirfield Village sits a very large rock bearing the names of every winner in the 40-year history of the Memorial Tournament. It’s a list that starts with Roger Maltbie in 1976 and ends with William McGirt in 2016. In the middle, on five separate inscriptions, is the name Tiger Woods. For years, Woods dominated the Memorial, claiming victory and posing with Jack Nicklaus on Sunday a record five times. Woods is the all-time money winner at this event, racking up more than $5 million in earnings. And once again this week, as in so many years past, Woods is the biggest story. Of course this time, golf has nothing to do with it. Woods early Monday again rocked the sports world with a mugshot that represented a new low in what’s been a stunning fall from grace. When Woods so much as sneezes, it qualifies as news in golf circles. So when he’s cited for DUI, the air comes out of the room. There is a tournament to be played this week at Muirfield, a good one, too. Seven of the top 10 players in the world are here just two weeks before the second major of the year. Jason Day is here trying to find balance in his life after aiding his mother in her fight with cancer. Dustin Johnson is looking to regain the form that saw him win three consecutive events before he injured his back at the Masters. Jordan Spieth is coming off a runner-up finish at Colonial one week after trying out a new putter and is somehow flying under the radar. There are storylines aplenty. And yet, as much as golf has moved on from Woods’ era of dominance, his is the only name that transcends the game. And the slow but steady trickle of updates coming out of the Jupiter Police Department is keeping fans and media members’ attentions rapt. Woods’ colleagues on Tour have spent the early week mostly discussing the states of their games, save for the time they’ve spent less-than-eagerly discussing Woods. When asked about the situation Tuesday, Day appeared frustrated that he hadn’t dodged the question and then saddened at his friend’s plight, saying that it was “tough to see Woods go through this.” Adam Scott thought for a second and didn’t look all that comfortable talking about it while offering that he was “just surprised and I guess a bit saddened to see that. I don’t … we should all – I don’t know all the details about it, but hopefully it’s not a worse problem than it is.” A day earlier, Jack Nicklaus called for support for Woods, and Dustin Johnson in an interview offered his thoughts and prayers. No doubt, once play gets underway here Thursday, the focus will return to golf. Should a Spieth or a Day or a DJ walk up the 18th fairway Sunday afternoon to a standing ovation, discussions will return to how a litany of young talents have banded together to take up Tiger’s mantle. The same thing will happen in two weeks at the U.S. Open. But no matter how good a story golf provides, Tiger is going to keep looming large, new details will continue to emerge. The dash cam video is coming. The results of his urine test will follow. There will be an arraignment, and court proceedings will proceed from there. And as in the past, there will be updates – real or fabricated – on his health, recovery, and future as an athlete. For those reasons, Woods is going to continue to exist in a parallel universe. We’ve arrived at a point where there are stories about golf, and there are stories about Tiger, and those two topics seem increasingly unrelated. Only once before was that dynamic as clear as it has been this week at the Memorial. But in 2009, when he dented up a different black SUV, Tiger Woods was still Tiger Woods. There was a surreal quality to the headlines back then. While the last few days have offered a look at a different kind of trouble, each successive setback in his personal life is proving progressively less surreal, progressively more believable when it comes to light. The game will move on in the way it already has. DJ, Day, Spieth, Rory McIlroy and the like will carry the torch and borrow from the best parts of “Tiger Woods, The Golfer” to great success. But Tiger is going to continue along in his own bubble, largely disconnected from the game he ruled. Until Woods makes a successful return, until he makes headlines for his play on the course, he’ll be a story unto himself. Perhaps the most revealing comments about Woods’ current relationship to the PGA Tour came from last week’s champion Kevin Kisner. A two-time Tour winner who has finished runner-up six times in the last three seasons. Kisner was asked on Tuesday how well he knows Woods. “Never met him,” he answered. As each new detail filters out over the coming days and weeks, Woods’ name will stay in the conversation. But each time one of his peers has to stop discussing his game to address whatever is going on with Tiger, the disconnect between Woods’ life and professional golf will grow wider.last_img read more

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Tiger in the mix: Seems like old times

first_imgPALM HARBOR, Fla. – For months, every millennial with a PGA Tour card has pined for the days when Tiger Woods’ name atop a leaderboard was akin to a national holiday. On Sunday at the Valspar Championship, they’ll get their fill. On Saturday, in a scene that could have been ripped from any number of mid-2000s highlight reels, Tiger did what Tiger does best, answering ever challenge and sending an unmistakable jolt across the Copperhead Course. For players of a certain age, Day 3 had a time-capsule feel to it, with Woods’ every move tracked by thousands and the 14-time major champion giving the masses plenty of reasons to shake the pine trees on his way to a third-round 67. “You could tell some of the roars were for him, for sure,” said Steve Stricker, who joined the Tour a year before Woods. “It’s fun to see again. Everybody is excited and he brings so much attention to our game.” Woods rolled in a 21-footer for birdie at the third hole, added another at the par-5 fifth and threatened to break the internet when he chipped in from behind the green at the ninth. That gave him a share of the lead with Brandt Snedeker and the most unlikely of opponents, Corey Conners, who has fewer rounds on Tour (64) than Tiger has Tour victories (79). Attendance records have already been shattered this week, ratings have been through the roof and anticipation, both real and manufactured, has no boundaries. On Friday when he moved to within two strokes of the lead, Las Vegas installed Woods as the third favorite to win this year’s Masters. At this rate officials may simply cancel the game’s most exclusive member-member at Augusta National in April and simply give Tiger his fifth green jacket. Under the best of circumstances in recent years Woods has been little more than a curiosity who more often generated headlines for all the wrong reasons. Fans flocked to the occasional tournament to catch a glimpse, social media continued to declare him the game’s G.O.A.T. and a generation of young players familiarized themselves with his accomplishments via YouTube videos, but there were precious few reasons to cheer. Full-field scores from the Valspar Championship Valspar Championship: Articles, photos and videos Before this season, the last time Woods had any chance anywhere on a Sunday was at the 2015 Wyndham Championship, but on that day he succumbed to a 50-year-old Davis Love III. He managed just a single start on Tour last season before being sidelined by fusion surgery on his lower back and the closest he’d come to greatness in recent years was as an assistant captain at the 2016 Ryder Cup and ’17 Presidents Cup. But on Saturday at a Copperhead Course that was filled to capacity, hopeful optimism gave way to bona fide fervor. If he can maintain this pace and win on Sunday, imagine how much confidence he would take to next week’s Arnold Palmer Invitational, which he’s won eight times? And what would this mean for the Masters, where he would have arrived amid a wave of expectations regardless of his recent form? “He’s a huge draw and he plays good this week and the excitement going into the Masters is going to be massive because I don’t know if any of us were really thinking he was a true favorite there and he might be after one more round of golf,” Adam Scott said. Predictably, Woods took a slightly more measured approach to the hyperbole that swirled through the cool air on Saturday. This comeback has been too long in the making for Tiger to jump the shark, even if the subject is Augusta National. “There are so many guys who played their way back up into this tournament. [Scott] played well, he got it up there. [Justin Rose] has been playing well,” reasoned Woods, who was tied for second place and a shot off the lead held by Conners. “There’s a lot of guys up there, myself included. I have to go out there and really play well again.” Yes, yes. Stay in the process. Ignore the distractions. Focus on the next shot, not the next tournament or next major. Nobody maintains his distance behind a mental firewall better than Tiger. But as the crowds grew in size and spirit on Saturday it was impossible to ignore the possibility. Imagine the pre-Masters buzz as Woods and Phil Mickelson, who won last week’s WGC-Mexico Championship for his first victory in over four years, motor down Magnolia Lane with true momentum. For all the 20-somethings who’ve spent their careers wondering what it would be like to play against Tiger at something approaching his best, the passing answer could be heard, and felt, with every cheer. “I was walking down the sixth and looked over to the fourth green. I said to my caddie, ‘Have you ever seen those crowds?’ eight deep back there,” Rose said. “It was a view that certainly wouldn’t have been the same had he not been playing. He’s on the leaderboard and challenging for the lead. Now that makes it really exciting.” Now it all seems so real. When Woods returned to the competitive fray in December at the Hero World Challenge, which could best be described as a rehab start, he spoke of his dramatically improved health and a genuine desire to be back on Tour. Even as he made his way through the West Coast swing with mixed results, he remained optimistic; and when he moved to within a field goal of the lead on Sunday at the Honda Classic the buzz was palpable. But this week along the Gulf Coast of Florida he’s irrevocably turned back the clock. All of the millennials who wanted to know what it was like when a red shirt on a Sunday was more than just a fashion statement are about to find out.last_img read more

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M. Lee leads, with Pressel among LA chasers

first_imgLOS ANGELES – Minjee Lee took advantage of fellow Australian Hannah Green’s problems Friday to take the second-round lead in the Hugel-Air Premia LA Open. The fourth-ranked Lee shot a 2-under 69 to reach 7-under 135 at Wilshire Country Club. She holed a wedge from 114 yards for eagle on the par-4 14th. ”Out of all the ones that I have been close to making, I think that’s the only one that I actually saw like drop into the hole,” Lee said. ”It was pretty cool to see it happen for the first time.” Green birdied three of the first six holes to get to 9 under, then played the final 12 in 5 over for a 73 that left her three strokes back at 4 under. She had a double bogey after hitting into the water on the par-4 17th – her eighth hole – and also had three bogeys. ”I just hit a really bad shot and got into the water,” Green said. ”Couldn’t really get myself out of jail, but definitely did not have the putter rolling as much as I would’ve liked. Had a couple three-putts, so that was pretty disappointing.” Lee had the eagle, two birdies and two bogeys. ”I think like it’s a second-shot golf course, so obviously it’s pretty generous off the tee,” Lee said. ”If you have your irons on and you have solid iron play then it’s really going to help you. I think that’s what I’m good at, so, yeah, I think that’s what is really helping me.” Full-field scores from the Hugel-Air Premia LA Open The four-time LPGA tour winner tied for third last week in Hawaii for her third top-three finish of the season. Denmark’s Nanna Koerstz Madsen was second after a 67. ”If you hit a good drive you get rewarded and you don’t have too far on the green, but if you’re a little bit off-line then it gets hard,” she said. Morgan Pressel (66) and Mexico’s Gaby Lopez (68) were 5 under. ”This course kind of has its quirks to where if you get on the wrong side of the pin it can be really challenging to get it up and down and save par,” Pressel said. ”I played smart and gave myself a lot of opportunities.” She was in the first group of the day off the first tee. ”It was definitely fresh greens,” Pressel said. ”Poa annua can definitely get bouncy, especially late in the afternoon.” Stacy Lewis, tied with Green for the first-round lead, matched Green with a 73 to finish at 4 under with playing partner Inbee Park (70), Danielle Kang (66), Jaclyn Lee (67), Shanshan Feng (70). Lewis had six bogeys, three on the first four holes. ”I really hit it good all day,” she said. ”Hit a couple squirrely shots, but it was harder, I thought, with the wind this afternoon.” Top-ranked Jin Young Ko was 2 under after her second straight 70, playing alongside third-ranked Ariya Jutanugarn and No. 7 Brooke Henderson. Henderson, the winner in Hawaii, was 1 under after a 73. Jutanugarn was another shot back after a 71. Second-ranked Sung Hyun Park, No. 6 Lexi Thompson and No. 10 Nelly Korda missed the cut. Sung Hyun Park shot 76-71, Thomson 75-72 and Korda 73-77.last_img read more

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Former champ Luiten in 6-way tie at Oman Open

first_imgMUSCAT, Oman — Joost Luiten was part of a six-way tie for the lead after the third round of the Oman Open as the Dutch golfer looks to win the European Tour event for the second time in three years. Luiten, the champion of the inaugural edition of the tournament in 2018, shot a bogey-free 5-under 67 and was on 11 under overall alongside Brandon Stone of South Africa (67), Callum Shinkwin of England (66), Rasmus Hojgaard of Denmark (70) and Finnish players Sami Valimaki (64) and Mikko Korhonen (65). Full-field scores from the Oman Open ”It always helps when you have won the tournament before but I think winning in general helps you go through the motions and the feeling of winning a tournament,” said the No. 102-ranked Luiten. ”I’m just going to enjoy it. You’ve got to enjoy the tension that comes with trying to win. I love it here and feel comfortable.” Italian player Guido Migliozzi was alone one stroke back at 10 under after a round of 68.last_img read more

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Henley uses hot putter to build lead at CJ Cup

first_imgNORTH LAS VEGAS, Nev. — Four shots behind at the start of the day, Russell Henley ran off three straight birdies to start the back nine Saturday and posted a 5-under 67 to build a three-shot lead going into the final round of the CJ Cup at Shadow Creek. Henley had plenty of help from the other players in his group. Xander Schauffele, who had a three-shot lead going into the weekend, had a pair of late bogeys and failed to capitalize on the par 5s in his round of 74. Tyrrell Hatton didn’t make a birdie until the final hole in a 73. Of the top 25 players, they were the only two who shot over par. Henley’s putting has been a great fit for the firm, glass-like greens of Shadow Creek. He leads the field in the most important putting category, and it has carried him to only the second 54-hole lead of his PGA Tour career. Henley was at 15-under 201. Lanto Griffin, who won his first PGA Tour event a year ago at the Houston Open, found the water off the tee on the par-5 18th and made bogey and still managed a 66. He was at 12-under 204 along with Talor Gooch (69), Jason Kokrak (68) and Schauffele, still in the mix despite a sloppy Saturday. Hatton was in the group five shots behind with Justin Thomas (68) and Jason Day, who had a 66 as the former world No. 1 tries to end more than two years without a victory. Henley’s key for Sunday at CJ Cup: ‘Just play my game’ Henley started to close the gap when he got up-and-down from a bunker in front of the green on the par-5 seventh, and Schauffele missed the green on the par-3 eighth and took bogey. And when they made the turn, Henley took off. He holed a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 10, hit driver just through the green on the reachable par-4 11th hole to set up a simple up-and-down for another birdie, and then hit his approach to just inside 5 feet on No. 12 for a third straight birdie. Henley closed with six straight pars, missing chances on the two par 5s, but no one could catch him. But he knows what can happen, having flipped his fortunes on Saturday. “Anybody can come at me,” Henley said. “You can go low out here. The greens are great and it’s gettable, but you’ve got to play well to do that. You’ve got to do everything well. I’ve got to just keep my head down and play a good round for me.” Schauffele was hopeful of at least finishing his round at par, and that didn’t go his way, either. He went long on the par-3 17th into rough so deep he could barely keep it on the green, leading to his fourth bogey. And he went just over the back of the 18th green in two, again in rough facing a downhill chip that he rolled all the way to the fringe. Schauffele likes to talk about “strokes gained attitude,” and it was a struggle for him with rounds that stretching close to six hours at Shadow Creek because of deep rough, limited marshals and plenty of searching. Sung Kang knows the feeling. He took an 11 on the par-4 second hole, which included two lost balls when he spent more than three minutes looking and came up empty. He also hit a few backward trying to escape trouble. Nothing worked. Schauffele wasn’t that bad. It just felt like it. “I was trying to figure out what was worse, the pace of play or my quality of golf,” he said. “It was kind of a tie today. Not to be a sour person, but just one of those days. Today was my bad day for the week. Got it out of the way before Sunday. I guess I’m in a familiar place being three back now.” CJ Cup at Shadow Creek: Full-field scores | Full coverage Schauffele has been trailing going into the final round in all four of his PGA Tour victories. Henley’s last victory was in 2017 at the Houston Open, where he came from four shots behind in the final round. Now he has a cushion at Shadow Creek, and a hot putter on putting surfaces he loves. DIVOTS: Jordan Spieth’s caddie, Michael Greller, left Las Vegas upon learning his mother had died. Spieth used Preston Valder, who played at UCLA and now helps Patrick Cantlay. … The CJ Cup announced next year’s tournament would be at Haesley Nine Bridges near Seoul. It was played the previous three years at Nine Bridges on Jeju Island. It’s at Shadow Creek this year only because of the COVID-19 pandemic and travel issues.last_img read more

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Happy Darwin Day! Our 2018 Censor of the Year Is Wikipedia

first_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Free Speech Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Today is the birthday of Charles Darwin, aka Darwin Day, which we recognize each year as the occasion for naming a Censor of the Year, or COTY. As Darwin himself said, in a scientific context, “A fair result can be obtained only by fully stating and balancing the facts and arguments on both sides of each question.” But through intimidation and silencing of views counter to evolutionary orthodoxy, such a “fair result” is just what our Censor seeks to undermine.Thank you, readers, for your nominations. For 2018, we’ve chosen what is I think our best, or rather worst, COTY yet: the omnipresent online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Let’s review the facts briefly.Intelligent design poses an ultimate question: Does nature offer evidence of purpose and design, or not? All thoughtful people must ask themselves that. Today, the natural first recourse for the questioning individual is to turn to Google. Looking up ID online will bring you immediately, the first entry, to the Wikipedia article. It commences with a lie:Intelligent design (ID) is a religious argument for the existence of God, presented by its proponents as “an evidence-based scientific theory about life’s origins”, though it has been discredited as pseudoscience.Actually, three lies. Here’s the truth: ID is a scientific not a religious argument. It is a theory of evolution, of why the forms of life originated and changed over the past 3.9 billion years. An alternative to the increasingly shaky neo-Darwinian theory of blind churning, it argues exclusively in scientific terms, never from religious authority. It’s an argument for design in biology and cosmology, not for the “existence of God.” Compatible with methodological naturalism, it candidly professes that science sheds no light on the source of the design in life, other than to say that source operates with purpose and forethought. And while it has certainly been attacked in scabrous terms, it hasn’t been “discredited.” Far from it. Even an atheist philosopher like Thomas Nagel concedes that ID poses a “fiendishly difficult” challenge.Yet anyone looking up ID on the Internet, or asking Amazon’s Alexa, which simply regurgitates Wikipedia, will be instantly turned off and likely give up investigating. That is, unless you already know how Wikipedia works, about the pseudonymous volunteer editors who run the place, with their axes to grind, standing ever ready, on a moment’s notice, to erase changes to pages they care about. The number of innocent people who have been misled by this article alone is beyond calculation.We’ve been aware of the problem, of course, for years. But the erasure of notable paleontologist Günter Bechly, after he came for ID, was the occasion of much discussion of censorship on the part of this ubiquitous source of information and disinformation, both here and among Darwinists and ID critics too. Another ID scholar, Walter Bradley, similarly saw his entry disemboweled.Larry Sanger, co-founder of Wikipedia, who personally rejects intelligent design, has blasted the editors for the “appallingly biased” article on ID. He adds, “I completely despair of persuading Wikipedians of the error of their ways. I’m just officially registering my protest.”On the subject of Bechly, our view is echoed by ID critics including Alex Berezow, a founding editor of the popular news aggregator site Real Clear Science, by the Darwinist group blog Panda’s Thumb, and as far afield as the liberal, secular Israeli newspaper Haaretz.Berezow writes:If a respected scientist endorses a controversial view, should he or she be erased from history? The editors at Wikipedia think so, but only if the controversial opinion is one they personally dislike.That’s precisely what happened to a respected German paleontologist, Günter Bechly. His biography on Wikipedia has been deleted. Poof. Gone. It’s like he never existed….Dr. Bechly… is guilty of committing a thought-crime, and his sentence is to be purged from the Internet. This is deeply troubling, and any true free speech and free thought advocates should be alarmed.You go, Alex Berezow! This year’s COTY, compared to past winners (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017), stands out for being widely recognized as a censor, not only by us. Wiki editors, behind their masks, also depart from the ways of past Censors in how frank they are, on their User pages, in admitting their biases.We struggled with whether to name Jimmy Wales, the encyclopedia’s other co-founder, as Censor. But the clowns, the masked mob, who do the actual “editing” win out for their tireless, frequently spiteful dedication to misleading the public. To solve the problem would require a massive rethinking of the entire concept behind Wikipedia. But like Larry Sanger, we despair of that.Fortunately, the public is increasingly sensitized both to fakery on the Internet (“fake news”) and agenda-driven behind-the-scenes shenanigans at online behemoths like Twitter and Facebook. And as we’ve pointed out, it’s not only ID that is misrepresented on Wikipedia. It can only be hoped that skepticism will spread, and drive Internet users to examine other sources and, yes, to think and read for themselves, without being led by the nose. TagsAlex BerezowAlexaAmazonCensor of the YearcensorshipFacebookfake newsfree speechGünter BechlyHaaretzintelligent designJimmy WalesLarry Sangermethodological naturalismNeo-DarwinismPanda’s ThumbReal Clear ScienceThomas NagelTwitterWalter Bradley,Trending Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesiscenter_img Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Intelligent Design Happy Darwin Day! Our 2018 Censor of the Year Is WikipediaDavid [email protected]_klinghofferFebruary 12, 2018, 1:06 AM Share Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Recommended A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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Shall We Be Darwin’s Yes-Men?

first_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Intelligent Design Shall We Be Darwin’s Yes-Men?David KlinghofferOctober 12, 2020, 4:44 PM As a young scientist, Dr. Denton came to realize this — that a designing intelligence had been active from the inception of physical reality at the Big Bang. In The Miracle of the Cell, he leads readers on to the next stage of his own journey of discovery. A shallow response to fine-tuning arguments is that of course the environment is fit for life. If it weren’t, we wouldn’t be around to observe it! Denton’s reply is that the fine-tuning is far, far, far more intricate, exacting, and interdependent than we could have expected. It’s more exacting than we know even today. As he emphasizes, this itself is a scientific discovery, but one that points away from materialist understandings of a universe without purpose. As Anderson and Denton discuss, fine-tuning “points” from above and below — from the level of the universe as a whole, and from the atomic level, the macro and micro — to living creatures of our biology. Physics and chemistry don’t just loosely “permit” us. They define exquisitely precise preconditions for our lives, and must have done so from the origin of the universe. Later, the biochemist and physician practiced intensive care medicine. In his hospital work, he watched the delicacy of all the biological systems that kept his patients alive, or trembling on the knife’s edge of life. He reflected on the extreme fine-tuning of biology for life, and again could not accept the Darwinian assurance that unintelligent evolution had it all in hand, offering a convincing explanation of life’s miracles, including the cell. Denton, influenced by Harvard biochemist Lawrence Henderson’s The Fitness of the Environment, wrote his own classic, Evolution: A Theory in Crisis. His work has extended now to The Miracle of the Cell, part of Denton’s Privileged Species series. Evolution Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos The Edge of Life Share Recommended Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour It’s sycophancy, really, that is being asked of us. Remember those “IN THIS HOUSE, WE BELIEVE…SCIENCE IS REAL” yard signs? If Michael Denton and other proponents of intelligent design had been Darwin’s yes-men and just trusted “the science,” we would all be in the dark about the reality of biological and cosmological origins. In an excellent ID the Future episode coinciding with the release of his new book, The Miracle of the Cell, Dr. Denton describes his own journey as a Darwin skeptic. Download the podcast or listen to it here. Talking with host Eric Anderson, Dr. Denton says the story behind his evolutionary skepticism goes back 50 years. Around 1970 he was a young researcher at Kings College London, thinking about how mammalian red blood cell could have become anucleate, that is, losing their nucleus. Could a process like that have evolved unguided through a series of gradual steps, as Darwin required? Such a thing seemed impossible to conceive. Image credit: Gerd Altmann via Pixabay.The motto on U.S. currency says “In God We Trust.” But as you may have noticed from media headlines, our culture is much more anxious at the moment that we should trust scientists. Or trust “Science,” aka “The Science.” The latter is defined not as a search for truth, unleashed from predetermined conclusions, but as whatever “The Scientists,” the right scientists, say at any given moment. TagsanucleateBig BangbiochemistrybiologyChemistrycurrencyEric Andersonevolutionfine tuningHarvard Universityintelligent designKing’s College LondonLawrence HendersonMichael Dentonnucleusphysical realityphysicsPrivileged Speciesred blood cellsscientistsThe Miracle of the Cell,Trending A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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