17th Street Bridge in Dawson Creek closed due to high water levels

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The City of Dawson Creek has closed the 17th Street Bridge because of rising water levels in the city’s namesake, though officials don’t believe that the water will rise to levels last seen two years ago.Dawson Creek’s General Manager of Development Services Kevin Henderson said the City decided to close the 17th Street bridge earlier today as a precautionary measure. Henderson explained that the water in Dawson Creek did overtop the bridge for a short time this morning, though it has since receded to approximately a foot below the road level.The bridge was one of several that were closed during the floods of June 2016, though it reopened a short time after.- Advertisement -Henderson said that the city’s other bridges and culverts, including the one that was famously overtopped two years ago on 8th St., are currently faring well with the high water levels. He said that officials have so far not had any reports of damage to residents’ property. Henderson added however that the situation may change as water levels tend to peak in the late afternoon due to the warn daytime temperatures.As another precautionary measure, the City of Dawson Creek is handing out free sand bags for residents. The sandbags and sand will be made available at the west side of Kitchen Park, at the corner of 18th Street and 109th Avenue. Henderson said that although the creek is not expected to reach levels seen in prior floods, there may be some residents who could use sandbags to divert runoff.Updates can be found on the City’s Facebook page.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Teens take over theater

first_img“Everything in the show has been written from their perspective on culture, society or how adults view teens,” said Steve Cisneros, founder and producing artistic director for Phantom Projects. “The whole idea was to get kids to speak to themselves,” Cisneros said. “Hence, that’s why you have topics from self-mutilation to crummy jobs.” This show will be unique in the performance world because no other theater company would produce a piece from a teenager, Cisneros said. Saturday’s show will be the result of the last three weeks of five to six hours of daily work, including one session that ended at sunrise. They developed one-act plays and other performances – some of which include music. The process started when 25 people applied to be in the show. After interviews, the number was narrowed to 13. LA MIRADA – For the last 10 years Phantom Projects has put on plays dealing with teenage issues ranging from underage sex to drugs and alcohol to eating disorders. But these performances always were written by adults about teenagers. On Saturday, there were be another performance, but this time the writers are the young people themselves. Thirteen young artists between the ages of 15 and 21 will combine to put on 18 different pieces as part of a nearly two-hour show at 7 p.m. at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts, 14900 La Mirada Blvd., La Mirada. Selection was based on talent and experience, Cisneros said. Every individual had at least five years of experience performing. Then on July 16, the 13 got together at the Phantom Projects warehouse in La Mirada and began brainstorming. “By the end of the first night, they had an outline of the show they wanted,” Cisneros said. “It was a matter of figuring out what their talents were and what they wanted to bring to the table.” Each brought many different written pieces – from dance to monologues to songs. Eighteen were chosen. In almost every case, they’re not one-person acts, but a combination of two to as many as four. “It’s not a talent show,” Cisneros said. “They’ve made an effort to make these pieces show where they are in their lives and what’s important to them right now.” For example, Ryan Wade, 15, of Anaheim wrote about a job he had. “My main monologue is about a job I had as a construction worker and how I didn’t like it,” Wade said. Johanna Middleton, 17, of Los Angeles wrote about her first pop-punk rock music festival. “What drew me to this was the opportunity to work with other kids my age, who are so passionate, and the creative environment,” Middleton said. The pieces will range from a couple of minutes to as long as eight or nine minutes and from comedy to drama. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for high school students and $5 for middle school students. They can be purchased by calling (562) 944-9801 or going online at www.phantomprojects.com [email protected] (562) 698-0955 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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