Brain scan research shows that lack of sleep severely alters brain function

first_imgSleep deprivation majorly impacts the brain’s connectivity and function, according to a recent study published this February in NeuroImage. As well as affecting many important networks, sleep deprivation prevented normal changes to brain function between the morning and evening.Sleep is an essential human state which is necessary for maintaining healthy function throughout the body. Therefore, lack of sleep has severe health-related consequences, with the brain being the most affected organ.Lack of sleep can negatively affect memory, emotional processing and attentional capacities. For example, sleep deprivation has been shown to disrupt functional connectivity in hippocampal circuits (important for memory), and between the amygdala (important for emotion regulation) and executive control regions (involved in processes such as attention, planning, reasoning and cognitive flexibility). The emotional effects of sleep deprivation can be to both alter response patterns to negative things but also enhance reactivity toward positive things. LinkedIn Share on Twitter Pinterest Emailcenter_img Share on Facebook Share The study, led by Tobias Kaufmann of University of Oslo, involved 60 young men who completed three resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans – this is used to evaluate connectivity between brain regions when a person is not performing a task.They were scanned in the morning and evening of the same day – this was to account for changes from morning to evening in normal brain function (diurnal variability). 41 men then underwent total sleep deprivation, whereas the remainder had another night of regular sleep, before they were scanned again the following morning. Finally, behavioural assessments of vigilance and visual attention were assessed.The findings revealed that sleep deprivation strongly altered the connectivity of many resting-state networks; most clearly affected were networks important for memory (hippocampal networks) and attention (dorsal attention networks), as well as the default mode network (an interconnected set of brain regions active when a person is daydreaming or their mind is wandering).In fact, they identified a set of 17 brain network connections showing altered brain connectivity. Furthermore, correlation analysis suggested that morning-to-evening connectivity changes returned the next day in the group that had slept the night, but not in the sleep-deprivation group.The study emphasizes the major impact of sleep deprivation on the brain’s connectivity and function, as well as providing evidence that normal morning-to-evening connectivity changes do not occur after a night without sleep.last_img read more

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Group Formed To Address Dangers Of Old Interfloor Factory – Dumfries

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInA Multi Agency group as part of Dumfries and Galloway’s Local Resilience Partnership, has been formed to address health and safety risks to the public at the former Interfloor site at Heathhall.Scottish Fire and Rescue, Police Scotland and Dumfries and Galloway Council would like to remind the public, and our young people in particular, about the dangers of entering ANY derelict buildings.Public safety is of our first priority and we would re-iterate that the public should stay clear of these buildings and the surrounding area.Parents are asked to re-inforce this message to their children. Know where your children are and inform them of the dangers of playing on such sites.We are currently in consultation with the owners of the Interfloor site regarding security and the clean-up process, but would ask the public to avoid the site at this time whilst we monitor the situation.SFRS Dumfries and Galloway Group Manager David Broughton said: “We are always concerned about the possibility of anyone accessing any empty premises. From experience, we know that derelict and empty buildings can become a target for malicious fires. “In such cases, we will always take a preventative approach by working with the owners and other local partners to secure such sites and raise awareness of the risks.“We also seek to educate young people about the dangers of setting fires, both for themselves and other members of the public.“Additionally, the danger of injury due to the environmental risks within such properties is a real concern. Unstable footing, broken glass and other hazards materials are often prevalent.“Such activity is not only reckless and dangerous, but can divert SFRS resources away from genuine emergencies. However, through robust and flexible strategic planning, our crews are always ready to respond to any incident to keep our communities safe.”If anyone sees anything suspicious or people entering the site, please phone Police Scotland on 101.last_img read more

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Holmdel Legion team looking to improve this summer

first_imgSquad currently has 2-3-2 mark The Holmdel High School American Legion junior team is off to a 2-3-2 start for its summer schedule under coach Tony Fernicola. Sponsored by American Legion Post 321 of Union Beach, the Holmdel squad has generally played well and has been in every game, the coach noted. “This isn’t all about winning,” Fernicola said. “It’s about having fun and learning and giving our players the opportunity to work on things. The main thing is that we want to keep them playing baseball.” The Holmdel contingent is playing a 20- game schedule in the Monmouth County American Legion league. While Fernicola has an 18-man roster, he usually requests that only 12 players attend each game. “It’s summer and some of our guys are working or doing other things,” he explained. “That’s all right, but all of our guys will have a chance to play. What I don’t want to do is have guys sitting on the bench who won’t get into the game.” Although Holmdel has three losses, Fernicola said that pitching has been a strong suit. His team’s combined ERA is under three runs per game – a good mark by any measure. Lefty Paul Rabat, A.J. and Alex Castiglia, Anthony Patres, Jim Tully, who attends Christian Brothers Academy, and Paul Curran, who attends Colts Neck High School, have all performed well on the hill. At the plate, Tully, who has become the heart of the team, is batting .420, followed closely by Anthony Canzoneri, a St. John Vianney product, who is hitting .415. Infielder John Sieg has also hit the ball well and is at .389. Outfielder Danny Morelli is also over the .300 mark with a team-leading three round-trippers. “Overall we’ve been hitting the ball hard; unfortunately, of late it’s been right at people,” Fernicola said. “If we keep doing that, more balls will eventually drop. Right now I’m actually pretty happy with the way we’ve been swinging the bat.” Outfielder Joe Pomarico has been doing a good job of putting the ball in play and infielder/ outfielder Tom LaPorta has been finding ways to get on base where he can take advantage of his speed. The coach noted that Alex Castiglia has been a defensive force behind the plate throwing out the majority of runners who have tried to steal. Other members of the team include catcher Nick Solfaro, infielders Frank Strick, Matthew Fernicola, Chris Bosco and Paul Curran, along with outfielder Brock Gomez. While the bulk of the team consists of Holmdel players, Tully, attends CBA; Canzoneri is at SJV; and Bosco, Curran and LaPorta attend Colts Neck. “While we’re all about learning, I have to say the team has also been very competitive,” Fernicola said. “We’ve been in every game and everyone has been working very hard. That’s all I can ask.” BY WARREN RAPPLEYEA Staff Writer last_img read more

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