Hutch has “fruitful exchange” with EC over O2 UK deal

first_img Las operadoras respaldan el papel de Qualcomm en la RAN abierta Previous ArticleGoogle reveals more progress with Project LoonNext ArticleVerizon hit with $1.35M fine for use of “supercookies” Dixons CarphoneHutchisonIliadO2Vodafone Tags Vodafone, Safaricom beat MTN to Ethiopia licence Home Hutch has “fruitful exchange” with EC over O2 UK deal CK Hutchison’s high-stakes summit with the EC drew existing rivals, and one potential new entrant, but was short on immediate results.Yesterday’s hearing gave Hutchison “the opportunity to have another fruitful exchange with the commission and the member states’ representatives concerning its proposed acquisition of O2 in the UK,” the company said in a statement.However, there has been no subsequent announcement about what remedies Hutch must accept if it wants its £10.25 billion takeover to go ahead.Other attendees included leading rivals in the mobile market Vodafone and BT (owner of EE), according to Reuters and Bloomberg. Also present were other interested parties such as Sky, Liberty Global and TalkTalk. In an increasingly converged marketplace, a wide range of parties have a vested interest in what happens in the Hutch-O2 deal.Most interesting was the presence of Xavier Niel’s Iliad, the disruptive French operator which potentially might enter the UK market, following any merger between Hutch and O2.Iliad appearred to be the only non-UK participant present at the meeting although presumably others are following developments in the hope of taking advantage of the Hutch-O2 deal to enter the UK.Also present was leading MVNO Tesco Telecom. MVNOs are concerned not just about future retail competition but also whether the terms on which they enjoy wholesale access might change.Leading mobile phone retailer Dixons Carphone as well as UKB Networks which offers broadband wireless services to businesses and the public sector were both at the meeting, as was Gamma Communications which provides fixed and mobile services to the enterprise sector. Related Richard Handford Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more Operators back Qualcomm role in open RAN path Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 08 MAR 2016 last_img read more

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Expanding age group opportunities to tri: USA Triathlon adds Physically Challenged…

first_img Related USA Triathlon (USAT) has revised its official rulebook to include a ground-breaking new Physically Challenged (PC) Open Division, meant to accommodate those athletes who wish to participate in sanctioned USAT events and do not meet classification or equipment criteria.Following approval from the USA Triathlon Board of Directors, the official language of the PC Open Division rules will apply to participants at 2014 USA Triathlon-sanctioned events. The rules modifications will allow competition opportunities to athletes with Americans with Disabilities Act-defined disabilities who may not fit into a paratriathlon medical classification, or who are unable to follow the strict equipment usage rules of paratriathlon.Participation in the PC Open Division is available to athletes with a medically verified physical, visual or neurological impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. The official rulebook is available at usatriathlon.org/rulebook.“By defining the PC Open Division and its guidelines in our rulebook, we are able to be more inclusive for all paratriathletes who may want to become involved in the sport,” said Charlie Crawford, USA Triathlon’s Commissioner of Officials. “Paratriathlon is strictly defined by the rules of each classification category, but USA Triathlon wants to be welcoming of any athlete with a disability and as we’ve looked for ways to offer those opportunities, this has been the best option for us to include as many athletes as possible.”USA Triathlon’s PC Open Division has been offered at a number of events since 2010, but the revisions to the rulebook will complement the official rules set forth by the International Triathlon Union (ITU) for paratriathlon competition.A new worldwide paratriathlon classification system will be implemented by ITU in 2014, and the PC Open Division rules in the United States will allow paratriathletes to continue competing even though they may not fit into the new system.The newly defined rules will also provide a gateway to the sport for new paratriathletes, which may increase the talent pool for the US team heading into the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, where paratriathlon will make its debut.usatriathlon.org/paratriathlonlast_img read more

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Proposed criminal jury instructions

first_img Definition. Fla. Stat. 776.06(1). “Deadly force” means force likely to cause death or great bodily harm. Give if applicable. § 782.02, Fla. Stat. The use of deadly force is justifiable only if the defendant reasonably believe s d that the force is was necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] while resisting an attempt to commit (applicable felony) upon [him] [her] or in any dwelling in which [he][she] was present. 1. (Defendant) was attempting to commit, committing, or escaping after the commission of (applicable forcible felony) ; or Insert and Define applicable forcible felony that defendant alleges victim was about to commit , but omit any reference to burden of proof. See Montijo v. State, 61 So. 3d 424 (Fla. 5 th DCA 2011) . Forcible felonies are listed in § 776.08, Fla. Stat. Aggressor. § 776.041, Fla. Stat. However, the use of deadly force is not justifiable if you find: Give only if there is evidence that the defendant is charged with was committing an independent forcible felony. See Giles v. State, 831 So. 2d 1263 (Fla. 4th DCA 2002). 1. another’s attempt to murder [him] [her], or 2. any attempt to commit (applicable felony) upon [him] [her], or 3. any attempt to commit (applicable felony) upon or in any dwelling, residence, or vehicle occupied by [him] [her]. 1. imminent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] or another, or 2. the imminent commission of (applicable forcible felony) [ against [himself] [herself] [ or another ] . ] a. It is a defense to the crime with which (defendant) is charged if the [death of] [injury to] (victim) resulted from the justifiable use of deadly force. Insert and Define applicable felony that defendant alleges victim attempted to commit , but omit any reference to burden of proof. See Montijo v. State, 61 So.3d 424 (Fla. 5 th DCA 2011) . Give if applicable. §§ 776.012, 776.031, Fla. Stat. A person is justified in using deadly force if [he] [she] reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent Force in resisting a law enforcement officer. § 776.051(1), Fla. Stat. A person is not justified in using force to resist an arrest by a law enforcement officer, or to resist a law enforcement officer who is engaged in the execution of a legal duty, if the law enforcement officer was acting in good faith and he or she is known, or reasonably appears, to be a law enforcement officer. Give the following instruction if applicable. However, if an officer uses excessive force to make an arrest, then a person is justified in the use of reasonable force to defend [himself] [herself] [another], but only to the extent [he] [she] reasonably believes such force is necessary. See § 776.012, Fla. Stat.; Ivester v. State, 398 So. 2d 926 (Fla. 1st DCA 1981); Jackson v. State, 463 So. 2d 372 (Fla. 5th DCA 1985). In some instances, the instructions applicable to §§ 776.012, 776.031, or 776.041, Fla. Stat., may need to be given in connection with this instruction. Read in all cases. In deciding whether the defendant was justified in the use of non-deadly force, you must judge [him] [her] by the circumstances by which [he] [she] was surrounded at the time the force was used. The danger facing the defendant need not have been actual; however, to justify the use of non-deadly force, the appearance of danger must have been so real that a reasonably cautious and prudent person under the same circumstances would have believed that the danger could be avoided only through the use of that force. Based upon appearances, the defendant must have actually believed that the danger was real. Reputation of victim known by defendant . Give if applicable. If you find that (victim) had a reputation of being a violent and dangerous person and that [his] [her] reputation was known to the defendant, you may consider this fact in determining whether the actions of the defendant were those of a reasonable person in dealing with an individual of that reputation. Reputation of victim not necessarily known by defendant (to show victim acted in conformity with victim’s character). Give if applicable. If you find that (victim) had a reputation of being a violent and dangerous person, you may consider this fact in determining whether [he] [she] was the initial aggressor. Physical abilities. Read in all cases. In considering the issue of self-defense, you may take into account the relative physical abilities and capacities of the defendant and (victim) . Read in all cases. If, in your consideration of the issue of self-defense you have a reasonable doubt on the question of whether the defendant was justified in the use of non-deadly force, you should find the defendant not guilty. However, if from the evidence you are convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant was not justified in the use of non-deadly force, then you should find [him] [her] guilty if all the elements of the charge have been proved. Comment b. It is a defense to the crime of (name of crime charged that did not result in injury or death) if the actions of the defendant constituted the justifiable use of deadly force. IN RE: STANDARD JURY INSTRUCTIONS IN CRIMINAL CASES—REPORT NO. 2012-03, CASE NO. SC12-1363 3.6(f) JUSTIFIABLE USE OF DEADLY FORCE Because there are many defenses applicable to self-defense, give only those parts of the instructions that are required by the evidence. Unless the evidence establishes the force used was deadly or non-deadly as a matter of law, both 3.6(f) and 3.6(g) must be given. Mathis v. State, 863 So. 2d 464 (Fla. 1 st DCA 2004). Read in all cases. An issue in this case is whether the defendant acted in self-defense. It is a defense to the offense with which (defendant) is charged if the [death of] [injury to] (victim) resulted from the justifiable use of deadly force. Give a or b as applicable. The Supreme Court Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases (committee) has submitted to the Florida Supreme Court a report proposing revisions to Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases 3.6(f) – Justifiable Use of Deadly Force; and 3.6(g) – Justifiable Use of Non-deadly Force. The Court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposed amendments, which are reproduced in full below, as well as online at http://www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/proposed.shtml. An original and nine paper copies of all comments must be filed with the Court on or before October 15, 2012, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, The Honorable Jacqueline Hogan Scola, 73 W. Flagler Street, Room 414, Miami, Florida 33130, c/o Bart Schneider, Office of the General Counsel, 500 S. Duval Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1925, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled in this case. The committee chair has until November 5, 2012, to file a response to any comments filed with the Court. Electronic copies of all comments also must be filed in accordance with the Court’s administrative order In re Mandatory Submission of Electronic Copies of Documents, Fla. Admin. Order No. AOSC04-84 (Sept. 13, 2004). IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA a. the person against whom the defensive force is used has the right to be in [or is a lawful resident of the [dwelling] [residence]] [the vehicle], such as an owner, lessee, or titleholder, and there is not an injunction for protection from domestic violence or a written pretrial supervision order of no contact against that person; or b. the person or persons sought to be removed is a child or grandchild, or is otherwise in the lawful custody or under the lawful guardianship of, the person against whom the defensive force is used; or c. the person who uses defensive force is engaged in an unlawful activity or is using the [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] to further an unlawful activity; ord. the person against whom the defensive force is used is a law enforcement officer, who enters or attempts to enter a [dwelling] [residence] [vehicle] in the performance of [his] [her] official duties and the officer identified [himself] [herself] in accordance with any applicable law or the person using the force knew or reasonably should have known that the person entering or attempting to enter was a law enforcement officer. 3. (Defendant) must have reasonably believed that [his] [her] use of force was necessary to prevent or terminate (victim’s) wrongful behavior. No duty to retreat (dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle). Give if applicable. If the defendant is in [his] [her] [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] [he] [she] is presumed to have held a reasonable fear of imminent peril of death or bodily injury to [himself] [herself] [another] if (victim) has [unlawfully and forcibly entered] [has removed or attempted to remove another person against that person’s will from] that [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] and the defendant had reason to believe that had occurred. The defendant had no duty to retreat under such circumstances. Presumption of fear (unlawful and forcible entry into dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle). Give if applicable. § 776.013(1), Fla. Stat. The defendant is presumed to have held a reasonable fear of imminent peril of death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [another] when using defensive force if: a. The person against whom the defensive force was used was in the process of unlawfully and forcefully entering, or had unlawfully and forcibly entered, a dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle, or if that person had removed or was attempting to remove another against that person’s will from the dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle; and b. The defendant knew or had reason to believe that an unlawful and forcible entry or unlawful and forcible act was occurring or had occurred. Exceptions to Presumption of Fear. § 776.013(2)(a)-(d), Fla. Stat. Give as applicable. The presumption of reasonable fear of imminent death or great bodily harm does not apply if: a. the person against whom the defensive force is used has the right to be in [or is a lawful resident of the [dwelling] [residence]] [the vehicle], such as an owner, lessee, or titleholder, and there is not an injunction for protection from domestic violence or a written pretrial supervision order of no contact against that person; or b. the person or persons sought to be removed is a child or grandchild, or is otherwise in the lawful custody or under the lawful guardianship of, the person against whom the defensive force is used; or c. the person who uses defensive force is engaged in an unlawful activity or is using the [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] to further an unlawful activity; or d. the person against whom the defensive force is used is a law enforcement officer, who enters or attempts to enter a [dwelling] [residence] [vehicle] in the performance of [his] [her] official duties and the officer identified [himself] [herself] in accordance with any applicable law or the person using the force knew or reasonably should have known that the person entering or attempting to enter was a law enforcement officer. If requested, give definition of “law enforcement officer” from §943.10(14), Fla. Stat. § 776.013(4), Fla. Stat. Give if applicable. A person who unlawfully and by force enters or attempts to enter another’s [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] is presumed to be doing so with the intent to commit an unlawful act involving force or violence. Definitions. Give if applicable. § 776.013(5), Fla. Stat. As used with regard to self defense, “Dwelling” means a building or conveyance of any kind, including any attached porch, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent or mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, and is designed to be occupied by people lodging therein at night. “Residence” means a dwelling in which a person resides either temporarily or permanently or is visiting as an invited guest. “Vehicle” means a conveyance of any kind, whether or not motorized, which is designed to transport people or property. No duty to retreat (location other than dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle). Give if applicable. See Novak v. State 974 So. 2d 520 (Fla. 4 th DCA 2008) regarding unlawful activity. There is no duty to retreat where the defendant was not engaged in any unlawful activity other than the crime(s) for which the defendant asserts the justification. If the defendant [ was not engaged in an unlawful activity and ] was attacked in any place where [he] [she] had a right to be, [he] [she] had no duty to retreat and had the right to stand [his] [her] ground and meet force with force, including deadly force, if [he] [she] reasonably believed that it was necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [another] or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. Definitions. As used with regard to self defense, “Dwelling” means a building or conveyance of any kind, including any attached porch, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent or mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, and is designed to be occupied by people lodging therein at night. “Residence” means a dwelling in which a person resides either temporarily or permanently or is visiting as an invited guest. “Vehicle” means a conveyance of any kind, whether or not motorized, which is designed to transport people or property. Define applicable forcible felony that defendant alleges victim was about to commit , but omit any reference to burden of proof. See Montijo v. State, 61 So. 3d 424 (Fla. 5 th DCA 2011) . Give in all cases. § 776.013(3), Fla. Stat. A person does not have a duty to retreat if the person is not engaged in an unlawful activity and is in a place where [he] [she] has a right to be. Duty to retreat when defendant was engaged in unlawful activity. Give if applicable. See Dorsey v. State, 74 So.3d 521 (Fla. 4 th DCA 2011). If the defendant was engaged in an unlawful activity, or if [he] [she] was attacked in a place where [he] [she] did not have a right to be, then the fact that the defendant was wrongfully attacked cannot justify [his] [her] use of force if, by retreating, [he] [she] could have avoided the need to use that force. However, if the defendant was wrongfully attacked or was wrongfully placed in a position of imminent danger of another’s use of unlawful force, and it would have increased [his] [her] own danger to retreat, then the defendant did not have a duty to retreat and [his] [her] use of non-deadly force was justifiable if [he] [she] reasonably believed that such force was necessary to prevent the use of unlawful force against [himself] [herself] or another. Aggressor. § 776.041, Fla. Stat. The use of non-deadly force is not justified if you find: Give only if there is evidence that the defendant is charged with was committing an independent forcible felony. See Giles v. State, 831 So. 2d 1263 (Fla. 4th DCA 2002). 1. (Defendant) was attempting to commit, committing, or escaping after the commission of a (applicable forcible felony). Define applicable forcible felony. 2. (Defendant) initially provoked the use of force against [himself] [herself], unless: a. The force asserted toward the defendant was so great that [he] [she] reasonably believed that [he] [she] was in imminent danger of death or great bodily harm and had exhausted every reasonable means to escape the danger, other than using non-deadly force on (assailant) . b. In good faith, the defendant withdrew from physical contact with ( assailant ) and indicated clearly to (assailant) that [he] [she] wanted to withdraw and stop the use of non-deadly force, but (assailant) continued or resumed the use of force. center_img Define applicable forcible felony. Define after paragraph 2 if both paragraphs 1 and 2 are given. Forcible felonies are listed in § 776.08, Fla. Stat. b. It is a defense to the crime of (name of crime charged that did not result in injury or death) if the actions of the defendant constituted the justifiable use of non-deadly force. Definition. “Non-deadly” force means force not likely to cause death or great bodily harm. In defense of person. § 776.012, Fla. Stat. Give if applicable. (Defendant) would be justified in using non-deadly force against (victim) if the following two facts are proved : 1. (Defendant) must have reasonably believed that such conduct was necessary to defend [himself] [herself] [another] against (victim’s) imminent use of unlawful force against the [defendant] [another person] . ; and 2. The use of unlawful force by (victim) must have appeared to (defendant) to be ready to take place. In defense of property. § 776.031, Fla. Stat. Give if applicable. (Defendant) would be justified in using non-deadly force against (victim) if the following three facts are proved : 1. (Victim) must have been was about to trespass or was trespassing or otherwise wrongfully interfering with land or personal property ; and . 2. The land or personal property must have was lawfully been in (defendant’s) possession, or in the possession of a member of [his] [her] immediate family or household, or in the possession of some person whose property [he] [she] was under a legal duty to protect ; and . September 15, 2012 Regular News Proposed criminal jury instructions If requested, give definition of “law enforcement officer” from § 943.10(14), Fla. Stat. , § 776.013(4), Fla. Stat. Give if as applicable. A person who unlawfully and by force enters or attempts to enter another’s [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] is presumed to be doing so with the intent to commit an unlawful act involving force or violence. Definitions. Give if applicable. § 776.013(5), Fla. Stat. As used with regard to self defense: “Dwelling” means a building or conveyance of any kind, including any attached porch, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent or mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, and is designed to be occupied by people lodging therein at night. “Residence” means a dwelling in which a person resides either temporarily or permanently or is visiting as an invited guest. “Vehicle” means a conveyance of any kind, whether or not motorized, which is designed to transport people or property . Prior threats. Give if applicable. If you find that the defendant who because of threats or prior difficulties with (victim) had reasonable grounds to believe that [he] [she] was in danger of death or great bodily harm at the hands of (victim), then the defendant had the right to arm [himself] [herself]. However, the defendant cannot justify the use of deadly force, if after arming [himself] [herself] [he] [she] renewed [his] [her] difficulty with (victim) when [he] [she] could have avoided the difficulty, although as previously explained if the defendant was not engaged in an unlawful activity and was attacked in any place where [he] [she] had a right to be, [he] [she] had no duty to retreat. Reputation of victim known by defendant . Give if applicable. If you find that (victim) had a reputation of being a violent and dangerous person and that [his] [her] reputation was known to the defendant, you may consider this fact in determining whether the actions of the defendant were those of a reasonable person in dealing with an individual of that reputation. Reputation of victim not necessarily known by defendant (to show victim acted in conformity with victim’s character). Give if applicable. If you find that (victim) had a reputation of being a violent and dangerous person, you may consider this fact in determining whether [he] [she] was the initial aggressor. Physical abilities. Read in all cases. In considering the issue of self-defense, you may take into account the relative physical abilities and capacities of the defendant and (victim). Read in all cases. If in your consideration of the issue of self-defense you have a reasonable doubt on the question of whether the defendant was justified in the use of deadly force, you should find the defendant not guilty. However, if from the evidence you are convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant was not justified in the use of deadly force, you should find [him] [her] guilty if all the elements of the charge have been proved. Comment Proposed criminal jury instructions a. It is a defense to the crime with which ( defendant) is charged if the [death of] [injury to] (victim) resulted from the justifiable use of non-deadly force. 2. (Defendant) initially provoked the use of force against [himself] [herself], unless: a. The force asserted toward the defendant was so great that [he] [she] reasonably believed that [he] [she] was in imminent danger of death or great bodily harm and had exhausted every reasonable means to escape the danger, other than using deadly force on (assailant) .b. In good faith, the defendant withdrew from physical contact with ( assailant ) and clearly indicated to (assailant) that [he] [she] wanted to withdraw and stop the use of deadly force, but (assailant) continued or resumed the use of force. Force in resisting a law enforcement officer. § 776.051(1), Fla. Stat. A person is not justified in using force to resist an arrest by a law enforcement officer, or to resist a law enforcement officer who is engaged in the execution of a legal duty, if the law enforcement officer was acting in good faith and he or she is known, or reasonably appears, to be a law enforcement officer. Give if applicable. However, if an officer uses excessive force to make an arrest, then a person is justified in the use of reasonable force to defend [himself] [herself] (or another) , but only to the extent [he] [she] reasonably believes such force is necessary. See § 776.012, Fla. Stat.; Ivester v. State, 398 So. 2d 926 (Fla. 1 st DCA 1981); Jackson v. State, 463 So. 2d 372 (Fla. 5 th DCA 1985). In some instances, the instructions applicable to §§ 776.012, 776.031, or 776.041, Fla. Stat., may need to be given in connection with this instruction. Read in all cases. In deciding whether defendant was justified in the use of deadly force, you must judge [him] [her] by the circumstances by which [he] [she] was surrounded at the time the force was used. The danger facing the defendant need not have been actual; however, to justify the use of deadly force, the appearance of danger must have been so real that a reasonably cautious and prudent person under the same circumstances would have believed that the danger could be avoided only through the use of that force. Based upon appearances, the defendant must have actually believed that the danger was real. No duty to retreat. § 776.013(3), Fla. Stat. See Novak v. State 974 So. 2d 520 (Fla. 4 th DCA 2008) regarding unlawful activity. There is no duty to retreat where the defendant was not engaged in any unlawful activity other than the crime(s) for which the defendant asserts the justification. If the defendant [ was not engaged in an unlawful activity and ] was attacked in any place where [he] [she] had a right to be, [he] [she] had no duty to retreat and had the right to stand [his] [her] ground and meet force with force, including deadly force, if [he] [she] reasonably believed that it was necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [another] or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. Define applicable forcible felony from list in § 776.08, Fla. Stat. that defendant alleges victim was about to commit , but omit any reference to burden of proof. See Montijo v. State, 61 So. 3d 424 (Fla. 5 th DCA 2011) . Presumption of Fear (dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle). Give if applicable. § 776.013, Fla. Stat. If the defendant was in a(n)[dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] where [he] [she] had a right to be, [he] [she] is presumed to have had a reasonable fear of imminent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [another] if (victim) had [unlawfully and forcibly entered] [removed or attempted to remove another person against that person’s will from] that [dwelling] [residence] [occupied vehicle] and the defendant had reason to believe that had occurred. The defendant had no duty to retreat under such circumstances. Duty to retreat when defendant was engaged in unlawful activity. Give if applicable. See Dorsey v. State, 74 So.3d 521 (4 th DCA 2011). If the defendant was engaged in an unlawful activity, or if [he] [she] was attacked in a place where [he] [she] did not have a right to be, then the fact that the defendant was wrongfully attacked cannot justify [his] [her] use of force likely to cause death or great bodily harm if, by retreating, [he] [she] could have avoided the need to use that force. However, if the defendant was wrongfully attacked or was wrongfully placed in a position of imminent danger of death or great bodily harm, and it would have increased [his] [her] own danger to retreat, then the defendant did not have a duty to retreat and [his] [her] use of force likely to cause death or great bodily harm was justifiable if [he] [she] reasonably believed that such force was necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [or another]. Presumption of fear (unlawful and forcible entry into dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle). Give if applicable. § 776.013(1), Fla. Stat. The defendant is presumed to have held a reasonable fear of imminent peril of death or great bodily harm to [himself] [herself] [another] when using defensive force that was intended or likely to cause death or great bodily harm to another if: a. The person against whom the defensive force was used was in the process of unlawfully and forcefully entering, or had unlawfully and forcibly entered, a dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle, or if that person had removed or was attempting to remove another against that person’s will from the dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle; and b. The defendant knew or had reason to believe that an unlawful and forcible entry or unlawful and forcible act was occurring or had occurred. Exceptions to Presumption of Fear. § 776.013(2)(a)-(d), Fla. Stat. Give as applicable. The presumption of reasonable fear of imminent death or great bodily harm does not apply if: This instruction was adopted in 1981 and was amended in 1985 [477 So. 2d 985], 1992 [603 So. 2d 1175], 2006 [930 So. 2d 612], 2008 [976 So. 2d 1081], and 2010 [27 So. 3d 640], and 2012. This instruction was adopted in 1981 and was amended in 1985 [477 So. 2d 985], 1999 [732 So. 2d 1044], 2000 [789 So. 2d 9 8 5 4], 2006 [930 So. 2d 612], 2008 [976 So. 2d 1081], and 2010 [27 So. 3d 640], and 2012. 3.6(g) JUSTIFIABLE USE OF NON-DEADLY FORCE Because there are many defenses applicable to self-defense, give only those parts of the instructions that are required by the evidence. Unless the evidence establishes that the force used was deadly or non-deadly as a matter of law, both 3.6(f) and 3.6(g) must be given. Mathis v. State, 863 So. 2d 464 (Fla. 1 st DCA 2004). Read in all cases. An issue in this case is whether the defendant acted in self-defense. It is a defense to the offense with which (defendant) is charged if the [death of] [injury to] (victim) resulted from the justifiable use of non-deadly force. Give a or b as applicable. last_img read more

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Nelson repeats as NCAA heavyweight champion

first_img—Dane Mizutani contributed to this report. The junior is the fifth heavyweight wrestler to win back-to-back titles for Minnesota. But he’s not satisfied with that.Nelson said his ultimate goal, even before he won the title last season, was to be a three-time champion. He said former Minnesota heavyweights Cole Konrad and Brock Lesnar were his inspiration.“Brock won it once. Cole won it twice,” Nelson said. “I’m right up there with [Konrad], and he’s a guy I always looked up to.”Nelson was the lone Minnesota wrestler to win an individual title, but the Gophers boasted eight All-Americans.Dylan Ness couldn’t build off his Big Ten championship from less than two weeks ago, and the sophomore finished fourth at 149 pounds. Ness shocked the world last season as the NCAA runner-up at 149.Logan Storley had a terrible performance at the Big Ten championships, but the sophomore bounced back to finish fourth at the NCAA meet. He lost in the third-place match to his best friend from high school, Robert Kokesh of Nebraska. Storley was a force all season long, but he seemed to hit a wall in the two postseason tournaments.Sophomore Scott Schiller (197 pounds) finished fifth, sophomore Chris Dardanes (133) finished sixth and both junior David Thorn (125) and senior Cody Yohn (165) finished seventh.Kevin Steinhaus (185), who was upset early in the tournament, did not place.Minnesota’s eight total All-Americans are the most in the nation for the second straight year. Nelson repeats as NCAA heavyweight championMinnesota finished third behind Penn State and Oklahoma State.The Daily Iowan/Rachel JessenIowa Mike Evans (174) wrestles Minnesota’s Logan Storley during the quarterfinals of the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships on Friday, March 22, 2013 at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines, Iowa. Storley won by decision, 3-2. Drew ClaussenMarch 25, 2013Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintA lot of elite wrestlers have walked the campus for the Gophers wrestling program.Tony Nelson’s name is now definitely on that list.Nelson repeated as the NCAA heavyweight champion over the weekend at the national championships in Des Moines, Iowa.“He wrestled very well,” head assistant coach Brandon Eggum said. “He seemed composed throughout the tournament.”Minnesota finished third as a team behind Penn State and Oklahoma State. The Nittany Lions won their third straight NCAA title.Nelson beat Mike McMullan of Northwestern 6-2 in the finals — the same man he beat less than two weeks ago to capture the Big Ten title.Eggum said McMullan is a very offensive wrestler.“Tony’s defense and counter scoring is so good that if you attack him, you can put yourself in danger,” Eggum said.Nelson said he’s realized all season that he’s had a target on his back. That hasn’t affected the way he wrestles.“They want to be the guy to beat you, [and] to come out and do it again was just a big accomplishment,” the senior said in a press conference after the match.Nelson finished the season with a 33-1 record. He lost his only match to Dom Bradley of Missouri at the Southern Scuffle.last_img read more

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Trump had a stronger connection with the studio audience in first 2016 presidential debate

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter “I was fortunate enough to work with an interdisciplinary group of scholars to explore this question more fully during this past presidential election. More generally, my training as a political scientist included an emphasis on human ethology — this came into play while I was following a passion of mine: coaching men’s and women’s college rugby,” Stewart said. “I observed that when my teams were successful, there was a sense of good humor to them that was denoted by laughter before, during, and after practice and games. In other words, there was a sense of playfulness that brought the respective teams together and led them to trust each other more and play even harder for each other.”The researchers analyzed responses from the studio audience during the first general election debate between Trump and Clinton on September 26, 2016 at Hofstra University.A group of 362 undergraduate students also watched the debate and evaluated the candidates’ performance. In addition, 14 Republicans, 11 Independents, and 9 Democrats from West Texas watched the debate and provided moment-to-moment assessments of each candidates’ likability. Trump and Clinton both elicited four applause/cheering events from the studio audience. Applause for Clinton resulted in higher likability ratings among Democrats and Independents, but lower likability ratings among Republicans. Applause for Trump, on the other hand, didn’t show a partisan bias. Trump also elicited significantly more laughter than Clinton, provoking 14 laughter events compared to Clinton’s seven. “Observable audience response matters in a variety of ways,” Stewart told PsyPost. “First, it bonds us together. Humans are social creatures that survive and thrive best (if at all) in groups. Laughter, applause/cheering, booing, and chanting provide reliable signals of followership (in response to the person making a comment), social connection (through the mimicry and/or contagiousness of the observable audience response), and social values (through what is being responded to and how).”“Second, what people are responding to tells us not only about what they value, but also the leader’s connection with them. Trump appeared to have a stronger connection with the studio audience – and importantly those watching on television and other media – during the first debate than did Clinton based upon the strength of the observable audience responses of laughter and applause-cheering. Furthermore, the type of comments used by both candidates, that entailed mostly ridicule and attacks of some kind, provided a real-time reflection of how polarized the 2016 campaign was.”“Third, we have known for a long time that ‘canned laughter’ can make even mediocre situation comedies appear humorous; the research we carried out suggests that other forms of observable audience response can affect viewers watching major political events such as debates. In other words, the intra-media effects extend beyond just laughter to potentially include applause, cheering, booing, and chanting.”But the research includes some caveats.“As this is an observational study carried out in ‘real-time’ there are any number of potential confounds that might have influenced our findings,” Stewart explained. “We also had one aspect of our study rendered invalid by a ceiling effect — we only anticipated there being at most ten humorous comments and the first 2016 general election presidential debate was much more raucous than any in modern history (twenty-one laughter and thirty-four observable audience responses in total).” “However, the trade-off of experimental controls (and internal validity) for the external validity of such an important event strengthens the inferences, and more importantly, the future research questions that may be drawn.”Stewart is also running experiments on how audience laughter influences the evaluation of leadership qualities such as competence, trustworthiness, and charisma. He is also “developing a cross-cultural observable audience response study that takes into account not just laughter, but also applause and booing, in how individuals respond to politicians.”Responses from the audience can provide important information to public figures.“The observable audience responses of laughter, applause-cheering, booing, and chanting all may be considered primal ‘votes’ that provided members of comparatively large groups we evolved to take part in with the ability to provide useful feedback to leaders,” Stewart explained. “In other words, the leaders were able to follow the followers’ preferences based upon the positivity-negativity (laughter and applause-cheering vs. booing) and intensity of their vocalizations.” “Our current political environment not only provides a mismatch through mediated politics in which fewer followers have direct contact with politicians, instead watching them on television and other media, but also serves to insulate the leaders from dissenting viewpoints when politicians communicate predominantly via social media. While social media has much greater reach, it not only tends to reinforce in-group vs. out-group differences, the response choices have a distinct positivity bias, with ‘likes’ being the default response and dissent being easily ignored.”The study, “Candidate Performance and Observable Audience Response: Laughter and Applause–Cheering During the First 2016 Clinton–Trump Presidential Debate“, was authored by Patrick A. Stewart, Austin D. Eubanks, Reagan G. Dye, Zijian H. Gong, Erik P. Bucy, Robert H. Wicks and Scott Eidelman. LinkedIn Sharecenter_img New research published in Frontiers in Psychology suggests that Donald Trump was more effective than Hillary Clinton in connecting with the studio audience during their first debate.“This builds on a long-term research that I started with my book ‘Debatable Humor‘ – there I found that John McCain, Mike Huckabee, Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton were the most humorous candidates (based upon laughter and taking speaking time into account) during the primary campaigns,” said Patrick A. Stewart, an associate professor at the University of Arkansas and corresponding author of the study.“During the 2012 election, I presented some of my findings to an auditorium of University of Arkansas, Fayetteville students and noticed the contagiousness of laughter when students responded to Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, as well as (apparently) the studio audience at the debates.” Email Pinterestlast_img read more

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FLU NEWS SCAN: H5N1 mutation, novel H5N5, Vietnam stops H5N1 vaccination, flu vaccine protection, US flu finale, HIV and H1N1

first_imgMay 27, 2011H5N1 strains in Egypt show increased ability to bind to human cellsH5N1 avian influenza viruses in Egypt have branched into new sublineages and have shown a mutation that helps them bind more readily to human cell receptors in the lower respiratory tract, which may indicate an increased pandemic potential, according to a study published yesterday. Researchers from Egypt, Japan, and Thailand conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H5N1 viruses isolated from 2006 to 2009 in Egypt. Using reverse genetics, they found that several new sublineages have acquired an enhanced receptor-binding affinity of the viral hemagglutinin to alpha-2,6-linked sialic acid (SA), which is a receptor-binding trait of human influenza strains. The mutation was associated with increased attachment to and infectivity in the lower respiratory tract but not the larynx of humans and also demonstrated increased virulence in mice. The authors conclude, “Our findings suggested that emergence of new H5 sublineages with alpha-2,6 SA specificity caused a subsequent increase in human H5N1 influenza virus infections in Egypt, and provided data for understanding the virus’s pandemic potential.”May 26 PLoS Pathog studyChinese scientists find two novel H5N5 viruses in ducksChinese researchers today said they have identified two novel highly pathogenic H5N5 avian influenza reassortants during routine surveillance in domestic ducks. Writing in the June issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, they said the two novel viruses were isolated from healthy mallard ducks at live poultry markets in eastern China in December 2008 and January 2009. During testing they were highly pathogenic in chickens and moderately pathogenic in mice. The investigators said the two new viruses are probably reassortants of Eurasian virus strains and that H5N1 subtypes could have provided their backbones. The group said the findings highlight the importance of ducks as vessels for creating new flu virus subtypes, and that, given free-range duck farming practices, the new strains could pose a threat to other poultry or to humans.June Emerg Infect Dis studyVietnam halts H5N1 poultry vaccination due to poor matchVietnam’s government announced yesterday that it has stopped its national program to immunize poultry against the H5N1 virus, because a new clade circulating in most of the country is ineffective against the vaccine, Reuters reported today. Vietnam’s animal health department said the vaccine supplies ordered from China do not work against the new clade, which is circulating in northern, coastal, central, and Central Highlands areas. The older clade is still circulating in southern provinces, it said. Vietnam is one of a handful of countries in which H5N1 virus is endemic in poultry. Some endemic countries use the vaccine to contain the virus, but its use is controversial, because asymptomatic infections can spread when vaccination programs aren’t adequately monitored.May 27 Reuters storyExperts say flu shot is best hedge over uncertainty of duration of immunityNext season’s flu vaccine will contain the same three strains as this season, which has influenza experts fielding questions about whether currently vaccinated people need to be immunized in the fall. Experts say vaccine production can drop off quickly for frail and older people, but the scientific data on how long the flu vaccine protects younger healthy populations are unclear, the Associated Press (AP) reported today. The last time two consecutive flu seasons had a vaccine with the same three strains was between 2002 and 2004. Nancy Cox, MD, who leads the flu division at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said that some studies suggest immunity that wanes over time isn’t strong enough to protect against flu. CDC officials have suggested that yearly vaccination can provide a hedge against the efficacy of existing vaccines, which is only about 70%, even when the vaccine is a good match with circulating strains. John Treanor, MD, a virologist at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, told the AP that experts don’t have a clear picture of how long flu vaccine protection lasts. The CDC says yearly vaccination will offer the best protection. Flu vaccine manufacturers recently predicted that they will make a record number of doses for the upcoming season, between 166 million and 173 million.US flu activity fades in season’s final updateIn its last weekly flu report of the season, the CDC said that most activity indicators continued to tail off, except for the percentage of deaths from pneumonia and flu, which rose slightly above the epidemic threshold. The percentage of doctors visits for flu-like illnesses remained at a level typical for summer months, and the percentage of respiratory specimens that tested positive for flu continued to decline. No pediatric deaths were reported, holding the season’s total at 105. The overall percentage of deaths from flu and pneumonia increased slightly, from 7.3% to 7.4%, putting it slightly above the epidemic threshold. CDC officials have said that flu deaths can sometimes lag other indicators. No states reported widespread, regional, or local geographic spread. Sporadic activity was reported by Puerto Rico and 21 states, which is six fewer states than the previous week. The CDC said it will publish its first weekly report for the 2011-12 flu season on Oct 14.May 27 CDC weekly flu surveillance reportStudy: HIV does not raise risk of severe H1N1 illnessPeople with HIV fared no worse than others during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, according to a retrospective study in the June issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Researchers analyzed data from 23 patients at a Seattle medical center who had lab-confirmed 2009 H1N1, 8 of whom required hospitalization. The 8 patients received therapy for a median of 6 days (range, 1-22), and 2 of them (25%) died. “Our findings are similar to those reported by others, suggesting that HIV infection alone does not appear to be a risk factor for severe pandemic (H1N1) 2009, provided that patients are not severely immunocompromised, do not have other risk factors associated with poor outcomes, and are treated for influenza soon after signs and symptoms develop,” the authors write.June Emerg Infect Dis reportlast_img read more

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Insect group pushes national tickborne disease reduction policy

first_imgA statement yesterday from the Entomological Society of America (ESA) called for a national strategy to invest in approaches that address the spread of ticks and the rising prevalence of tickborne diseases in humans.Tickborne diseases are responsible for about 300,000 human illnesses per year in the United States, accounting for $700 million to $1.3 billion in annual costs, the ESA said. The economic burden on public health systems is estimated to be at least three times higher.Strategy and prioritiesResearch, training, and development of technology are at the heart of the ESA’s strategy, partly because ecological changes and the identification of new tickborne diseases have led to what ESA President Phil Mulder, PhD, calls a “tick literacy deficit” in both scientists and members of the public.”The rapid rise in tick-borne diseases is a critical national issue. A recent confluence of environmental, ecological, sociological, and human demographic factors has created a near ‘perfect storm, ‘ leading to more ticks in more places, ” Mulder said.The statement advocates for an integrated approach among universities, industry, and government to addressing tickborne disease, noting that entomologists have unique capabilities to help prevent human disease.New diseases, expanding Lyme threatIts priorities come on the heels of new tickborne diseases identified in the United States over the past several years and the increasing spread of ticks across the country. Bourbon virus, which was identified in 2014 after it caused the death of a Kansas man, currently has no treatment or vaccine. Heartland virus was first identified in 2009 after it severely sickened two Missouri men.The ESA requests policies and investments that strengthen research into development of vaccines, repellents, attractants, and acaricides. Also of high importance are ecological surveillance technologies and methods that will allow researchers to visualize interactions between ticks, their animal hosts, and the landscape.Lyme disease, which is spread by deer ticks and can cause severe illness, continues to gain a foothold across the United States. A 2014 North Dakota survey found that ticks carrying the pathogens that cause Lyme disease and anaplasmosis had spread into the state. A study in upstate New York found that a sample of deer ticks carried multiple pathogens, potentially exposing people to more than one disease with a single bite.Investing in new partnershipsThe ESA statement emphasizes that gains in preventing tickborne disease will come with greater investment in training professional entomologists and citizen-scientists to monitor tick biology and pathogens. International partnerships that prevent introduction of new diseases are also a key focus of the statement; the ESA estimates that preventing new tickborne diseases from entering the US would save the livestock industry more than $3 billion each year.An integrated approach focused on scientific research, ecological understanding, training for new scientists, and partnerships with those who can translate research into technology will “solve the tick problem,” asserts the ESA.See also:Aug 10 ESA statementMay 29 CIDRAP News scan on second Bourbon virus caseFeb 20 CIDRAP News scan on first Bourbon virus caseSept 12, 2014, CIDRAP News scan on Lyme disease spreadJun 20, 2014, CIDRAP News scan on Lyme disease coinfectionJul 22, 2013, CIDRAP News story on Heartland viruslast_img read more

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News Scan for Jul 14, 2017

first_imgNew case of measles in Minnesota reportedThe Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) said there was a new case of measles in an adult who visited several public places while infectious. The new case brings the total to 79 for Minnesota’s ongoing measles outbreak.The patient, who is described as white and from Hennepin County, was unvaccinated and in proximity to several unvaccinated people, according to a news story in the Star Tribune. The MDH said the individual was “likely exposed to measles at locations frequented by the last identified case.” The patient visited several public locations in Hennepin, Ramsey and Carver counties before being diagnosed with measles.”While there’s been some recent speculation that the outbreak was nearing its end, we’ve been cautious about making any predictions,” said Kristen Ehresmann, RN, MPH, director of infectious disease for MDH, said in a press release. “When you’re dealing with a disease that can spread as easily as measles, you need to keep your guard up until the very end of the possible timeframe when people could get sick.”Most (90%) Minnesotans are vaccinated against measles, but pockets of unvaccinated communities, including Somali-Americans, have caused outbreaks in recent years. The MDH said 42 days must pass with no new cases reported before they can say the current outbreak is over.Jul 13 MDH press releaseJul 13 Star Tribune story  Adult diagnosed with Jamestown Canyon virus in MaineAn older adult from Kennebec County, Maine, was diagnosed with Jamestown Canyon virus, a rare mosquito-borne disease, after his symptoms began in early June. The patient was hospitalized but recovered at home.Initial statements from state officials said this may be the first documented case of Jamestown Canyon virus in Maine. Symptoms include fever, neck stiffness and body aches, and in rare cases the illness can develop into meningitis and encephalitis. Mosquitoes become infected after feeding off of deer, and most human infections occur in late summer and early fall.According to a post on ProMED Mail, an message board of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, there were only 31 cases of the disease documented nationally over a 14-year period.Jul 13 State of Maine press releaseJul 13 ProMED Mail post UN general assembly approves funds for Haiti cholera trust fundThe United Nations (UN) General Assembly approved a resolution yesterday to transfer $40.5 million in unspent funds to help Haiti recover from a cholera outbreak, according to an Associated Press (AP) report.The outbreak in 2010 occurred in the wake of a massive earthquake, and investigations have said the virus was brought into the country by UN peacekeepers from Nepal. The outbreak sickened about 800,000 and led to about 9,000 deaths.  The UN has accepted some blame for the outbreak and had vowed to raise about $400 million to help affected communities. However, as of late May, only $2.67 million had been contributed to an earmarked trust fund.The funding approved yesterday comes from unspent money from the UN Haiti peacekeeping mission, which will end in October after 13 years. The UN’s goals for reducing the cholera burden in Haiti is aimed at improving water, sanitation, and health systems, as well as expanding access to care and supporting communities.Jul 13 AP story Zika and chikungunya led to neuro complications in patientA 74-year-old man who suffered simultaneous Zika and chikungunya infections developed severe meningoencephalitis and neurological injury as a patient in a northeastern Brazilian hospital. A new case history published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases describes the man’s illness, offering one of the first accounts of severe brain damage due to Zika and chikungunya co-infection.The patient presented at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, in April of 2016, complaining of fever and edema. Three days later the patient’s condition worsened considerably, and he went into shock and experienced hypoxia, eventually requiring mechanical ventilation. MRIs showed inflammation in the brain, and blood tests confirmed Zika and chikungunya. The patient was treated for 5 days with intravenous human immunoglobulin. Six months after infection, he made almost a full recovery, but still complained of strength deficiency in the lower limbs.”Although data on literature is still scarce, we cannot exclude the possibility that coinfections could lead to more severe neurological damage,” the authors concluded. “In fact, the case here presented reinforces the need of arboviruses effective surveillance programs in recently affected areas, especially in those that are now epidemic for Zika.”Jul 13 PLoS Neg Trop Disstudy APHIS releases response and preparedness plan for emerging animal diseasesThe US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today unveiled an emerging animal disease preparedness and response plan, which sets out a strategy for detecting and responding to disease events and defines the process for identifying, evaluating, and responding to emerging diseases in animal populations.In a statement today, APHIS said it developed a framework for the plan in 2014 and sought input from federal and state agencies, veterinary labs, livestock groups, and individuals.  Feedback from the stakeholders is included in the plan, which APHIS said is a living document that can be updated as infrastructure and policies change.One theme of the document is that rather than offering a single process to fit all emerging diseases, it spells out roles and responsibilities across business units for evaluating animal health information and determining response options. It also details the need for collaboration among all the different stakeholder groups.Jul 14 APHIS press release Jul 14 APHIS emerging animal diseases preparedness and response planlast_img read more

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First BWTS-Fitted Oceangoing Laker Sails the Great Lakes

first_imgThe 2016-built oceangoing laker Federal Caribou, owned by Canadian bulk shipowner Fednav Limited, recently arrived at Burns Harbor, Port of Indiana, marking a milestone as it became the first vessel in the Great Lakes to treat ballast water using an onboard system, according to the company.The 34,564 dwt vessel treats its ballast water two times, by conducting an exchange in the North Atlantic and through filtration and a chlorine disinfection treatment on the ship.Designed specifically for the Great Lakes, Federal Caribou, which has box-shaped holds in order to facilitate the handling of general cargo, is a part of a series of 16 Handysize vessels planned under the company’s USD 400 million investment.In April 2015, Fednav signed an agreement with JFE Engineering Corporation for the installation of ballast water treatment systems (BWTS) BallastAce on board its new ocean-going lakers.These vessels feature 25% fewer greenhouse gas emissions than similar vessels built less than 15 years ago, a decrease of over 15% in nitrogen oxide emissions, and a CLEAN notation from the DNV/GL classification society, according to Fednav.last_img read more

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UWF Women’s Basketball Announces Talented Recruiting Class in Preparation for the 2008-2009 Season

first_img PENSACOLA, Fla. – Head Coach Shannan Bergen has announced the signing of seven newcomers to the Argos Women’s Basketball program. Of the seven newcomers, there are two freshmen, four junior college transfers and one transfer from the University of North Florida. “I am extremely excited about the seven new players that I have signed,” claimed Bergen. “Each one of them possesses unbelievable skill and will help contribute right away. Along with my returning players, I feel that the UWF women’s basketball program has the potential to compete for the top spot in the Gulf South Conference, as well as in the south region. I feel a lot of positive energy going into next season, and I can’t wait to get started this fall!” “The point guard/guard position is where I added the most depth,” stated Bergen. “I believe the point guard spot is going to be outstanding.” Bergen has signed three point guards who also have the ability to play the wing position. Krissy Diggs, a two year starter from Pensacola Junior College, along with Tiffany Williams, a transfer from North Florida, bring experience at the point guard position. In addition to the two juniors, Bergen added freshman point guard Mercedes Jones, who starred at Washington High School. At the wing position, Bergen added a junior college transfer and a freshman. Victoria Hunt, a two year starter at PJC, was a first team All-Pandhandle Conference selection. Freshman Keaundrea Merriewether, is a versatile guard, who comes from University Christian in Jacksonville. “Victoria and Keaundrea are both extremely talented and will add significant depth to the wing spot,” states Bergen. At the forward position, she added two junior college transfers. Jessica Young, who played one year at PJC, and one year at Wallace-Hanceville CC, and Jamie Freeman, a two year player at Okaloosa Walton Community College. “Both are strong defensively and superior rebounders,” says Bergen. “Jessica and Jamie will both immediately impact our forward depth.” Victoria Hunt played for Coach Rigby at PJC for two seasons, and averaged 13 points per game, and shot 42% from field and 36.6% from behind the 3 pt line. She was a first team All-Panhandle conference selection. Hunt is from Roxie, Miss., and is a 5-8 guard. She played ball at PJC with Krissy Diggs and one year with Jessica Young. Hunt played high school basketball at Franklin County High school in Meadville, Mississippi. “Victoria is a dynamite wing player who can score in a variety of ways,” says Bergen. “She runs the floor well and can play solid defense. I am thrilled to have her here at UWF,” claims Bergen. Jessica Young played her first year at PJC with Hunt and Diggs and then transferred to play at Wallace-Hanceville community college for her sophomore season. Young played high school ball at East Lawerence high school in Hillsboro, AL., where she was a high school teammate of Krissy Diggs, another incoming Argo. Young averaged 16 pts a game and 10 rebounds a game during this last season. She shot an impressive 60% from the field. As a 5-11 post player, Jessica earned first team all-conference and honorable mention All-American selections for her outstanding play last season. “Jessica is an incredible athlete who can run the floor extremely well, rebound, block shots, and score from the low block. I am excited to have a post player of her skill level,” claims Bergen. Tiffany Williams transfers from the University of North Florida, Tiffany started five games and averaged 14.8 minutes per game last season. She averaged 3.7 points per game, 1.6 rebounds, and 1.5 steals. Her career high came against the 19th ranked team in the nation at the time, Florida State, when she scored 14 points, while having 3 steals, and 3 rebounds. She also was named player of the week for her performance. Tiffany also earned All Academic honors her freshmen year. Williams played her high school ball at Boca Ciega high school, and helped lead her team to a district championship and three straight conference championships. She was a three time First team All-Conference selection. “Tiffany has great size for a point guard,” says Bergen. “She can handle the ball very well and will give us a scoring threat from the point position.” Krissy Diggs transfers from PJC. During her two years, she was named to the Panhandle All-Conference team as Freshmen of the year, and then earned all All-Academic both years. She was second in assist in the Panhandle Conference, this past year. During her Freshman year, she averaged 6 points, 6 assists, and 4 rebounds. During her Sophomore year, she averaged 8 points, 7 assists, and 3 rebounds a game. Diggs played high school ball at Lawrence High School in Hillsboro, Alabama, where she made All-County 3 years, and All-Regional 3 years. Throughout her high school career, she accumulated 500 assist and 1,000 points, and averaged 15 points, 8 assists, and 7 rebounds per game. “Krissy comes to us with a lot of experience from PJC. She is a gritty point guard who has the potential to play the wing as well, and I am looking for her to excel here at UWF,” states Bergen. Jamie Freeman comes to UWF after two solid season at Okaloosa-Walton College, where she averaged four points and six rebounds a game. She was voted the best defensive player. She lettered 3 years in varsity basketball at John L.Leflore High School, in Mobile, Alabama, where she was an All-County/All-Region Player. During her Senior year, she averaged 15 points and 11 rebounds per game. “Jamie is the type of player who loves to do all the `dirty’ work in the post,” says Bergen. She is a great defender and rebounder and will be very valuable in our program.” Freshman Keaundrea Merriewether has excelled at being an ultimate team player in high school, playing several different positions. She helped lead her team to winning a state championship in 2006 at Shekinah Christian Academy as a 10th grader. She was awarded the 2006 State Farm, Good Neighbor, Good Sport award in the state championship. As a junior at Shekinah, Keaundrea averaged 15 points, 4 assists, and 5 rebounds per game. As a senior at University Christian School, Keaundrea averaged 11 points, 7 rebounds, and 3 assists per game. She played with four other seniors who received basketball scholarships and helped the Fighting Christians to a record of 27-2. “Keaundrea has a lot of versatility which will make her a dynamic player,” claims Bergen. “She is a superior defender and does a lot of little things that helps a team win ball games.” Freshman Mercedes Jones, played at Washington high school in Pensacola. She was an intergal part of a team that made it to the District finals. As the starting point guard, she averaged 11 points and five assists per game. She shot 48% from the field, as well as from the three point line. She was voted the best defensive player, and set the school record for assists, along with being the team captain during her senior season. “Mercedes is a fiery point guard who can definitely push the tempo. She played on an outstanding high school team and her experience will be seen right away,” states Bergen. The 2008-2009 Argos will begin the season will their annual tip off classic on November 15th and 16th, here in Pensacola. Harding will be the first opponent, followed by Delta State. The entire schedule can be found on the Women’s Basketball page on www.goargos.com. Print Friendly Version Share UWF Women’s Basketball Announces Talented Recruiting Class in Preparation for the 2008-2009 Seasonlast_img
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