Electric Demand Set for Moderate Growth in EIA Long-Term Outlook

first_img 2.6.2018 By chloecox – Coal’s decline, which recorded a loss of 60 GW between 2011 and 2016, will become less sharp with an expected 65 GW lost through 2030. EIA expects coal to level off at a total of 190 GW through 2050. Electricity prices are set to stay relatively flat, ranging between 10.6 cents and 11.8 cents per kWh, depending on the amount of economic growth and the performance of oil and gas prices and availability. Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Nonhydro renewable generation is expected to grow by an average of 139 percent through 2050, with 94 percent coming from solar and wind. Total wind capacity is expected to increase by 20 GW, with solar increasing by 127 GW. Energy storage systems are set to grow by 34 GW. By Editors of Power Engineering No posts to display Previous articleAES to Reorganize, Consolidate UnitsNext articleSettlement Reached Over Kemper County Payments chloecox Natural gas will remain the top fuel source for generation in most scenarios, though a scenario with low oil and gas resources and technology would see it drop below coal and renewables. Electric Demand Set for Moderate Growth in EIA Long-Term Outlook Though electricity demand fell last year, the new long-term energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration indicated demand is set for an average annual growth of 0.9 percent through 2050.center_img However, the administration predicted direct-use generation will outpace the growth of utility-based generation thanks to rooftop solar and natural gas-fired combined heat and power systems. Linkedin TAGSSCE Facebook Twitter In all cases, generation costs are set to fall by 10 percent over the study period in response to low natural gas prices and increased generation from renewables. Transmission costs will grow 24 percent and distribution will grow 25 percent thanks to the need to replace aging infrastructure and accommodate new reliability standards. Nuclear energy, which remained nearly steady over the last decade, will start a continued decline thanks to lower revenues that will be especially sharp in the high oil and gas resource and technology scenario. On average, nuclear generation is set to fall from 99 GW now to 79 GW in 2050, with no new plant additions expected after 2020.  CoalEnergy StorageGasNuclearRenewablesSolarWind Vietnam: scaling back coal-fired plans toward gas, renewables Venture Global LNG adds Zachry to EPC team for Gulf export terminal construction Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale Linkedinlast_img read more

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Mission to change Boeing’s image in Europe

first_img“We want to make sure that Europe understands the Boeing presence, and thefact that there are 90,000 jobs a year because of Boeing sub-contracts.Last year, we finished with 58% of the market here with orders worth around7.2 billion ecu.”Europe and Boeing’s interests do converge on some issues. But it takes onlya few questions to encourage Woodard to attack his company’s main rival,the indisputably more European Airbus Consortium, over everything fromgovernment subsidies to its launch programme for new aircraft types.Rightly or wrongly, most Europeans will miss the subtlety of Boeing’smessage and read an attack on Airbus as an attack on one of the continent’sfew industrial success stories.Nevertheless, Boeing, Airbus and just about everyone else in the aviationindustry can find common ground when it comes to discussing the issue ofcongestion in the sky.The inability of Europe to deal with its air traffic control (ATC) problems- which are leading to increased delays for airlines, threaten to brakemarket growth and add to environmental problems – are a shared concern. Some of the misconceptions which surfaced around the deal are still beingput right, such as the idea that Boeing also wanted to move in on aircraftmaintenance activities. “We never wanted to compete head-on with airlinessuch as Lufthansa,” says Woodard.Airbus’ plans to launch a new, large passenger aircraft attract onlycriticism from Woodard as he sums up all that he regards as worst about theEuropean consortium.“We were unable to find a market for a very large aircraft. We believefirmly that if you are in private business trying to make money, you willnot make that aircraft,” he says. “I think the Europeans do not understandthe cost of development. They are talking about an 8-billion-ecu programme.I think it could be running into twice that.”If Airbus is so confident about the market for the new aircraft, arguesWoodward, then it should be able to convince banks to come up with thedevelopment funds and not need to rely on the traditional formula ofrepayable government loans.“We would support our government in any attempt to renegotiate the currentEU-US agreement on aviation subsidies so that it creates a levelplaying-field,” he adds. In practice, however, it only takes a few minutes with plain-speaking RonWoodard, president of Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, to realise that heis on what amounts to a mission impossible.Woodard wants to change Boeing’s image of being as American as apple pie.“We have 436 suppliers in Europe and are the main customer of Frenchaero-engine company Snecma,” he said on a recent round-Europe tour whichtook him to Brussels, London, Paris, Munich and Cologne.center_img “There are much greater environmental benefits to be made from tackling ATCproblems than by looking for improved efficiency from aero engines,” saysWoodard.Boeing, like its counterparts on this side of the Atlantic, would welcomeEuropean action on the much-mooted issue of creating a single regulatoryauthority similar to the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) for approvingnew types of aircraft and investigating safety problems.“At the moment, it is still individual European countries that takecertification decisions. It adds considerable costs and complexity to theprocess. Europe’s Joint Aviation Authorities just act as a clearing pointfor individual national issues,” says Woodard, adding: “This is a highpriority for the UK presidency and for Transport Commissioner NeilKinnock.”Waving its European credentials, Boeing also believes that it should beallowed easier access to EU research and development programmes. “NASAresearch is open to everyone regardless of their origin. Research in Europeis not open to people outside Europe,” complains Woodard.Last year – the regulatory rumpus over Boeing’s take-over of McDonnellDouglas apart – was a good one for the Seattle-based firm. The Asian crisisis likely to wipe out 20 new orders annually for the next three years fromthe region, but that should hardly make a dent in the company’s hugebacklog of orders.Boeing would like to put the battle over McDonnell Douglas behind it, butEurope’s response still raises questions. “On the civil side, I was justamazed by the reaction. Douglas was such a small percentage of thebusiness, just 3%. The initial reaction was an okay from Airbus. Then itbecame a cause celebre,” says Woodard, adding: “I was surprised there wasnot more made of the military side.”last_img read more

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MessageMe system to be tested April 16

first_imgThe University will test its emergency text-messaging system, MessageMe, on April 16. The test message will be broadcast midday to more than 14,000 Harvard community members who have signed up for the alert system to date.Users do not have to do anything to acknowledge receipt of the test alert. “Just delete the message after you receive it,” said Stephen Rivers, Telecommunications Operations manager for University Information Systems. “The system will automatically confirm who has received our test alert and provide that data to administrators working with the system here.”In an actual extreme, campuswide emergency, users would receive directions about actions to take to help ensure their safety. They might also be asked to pass along important information to others in their immediate area, such as a classroom, dormitory, or playing field.This test will be the largest activation of the system since its inception in August 2007. “We’ve never had an emergency that was extreme enough to require University-wide MessageMe activation, and hopefully we never will,” Rivers said. “To be on the safe side, however, periodically we do need to run tests of this sort.” Plans call for testing twice per year.MessageMe is one of several alert systems the University would employ in the event of a wide-scale emergency situation. During a crisis, messages would also be posted on the University Web sites www.harvard.edu and www.emergency.harvard.edu; recorded on the special-conditions telephone line, (617) 496-NEWS; e-mailed to affected groups; and delivered via campus telephones.Harvard community members are encouraged to sign up for MessageMe, which is free and confidential. Yearly registration with a Harvard PIN is required. To learn more, visit the Web site www.messageme.harvard.edu/, and those with questions or concerns about the test may e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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Porsche launches new 911 Carrera C4 at Vermont’s Sugarbush Resort

first_imgPorsche Cars North Americas latest launch unveils a unique approach for the company. Dealers from PCNA Area East will host groups of clients at Sugarbush to experience the all-new 911 Carrera 4S first hand in wintry conditions. Porsche is thrilled to be able to showcase the winter driving capabilities of the all-new 911 Carrera 4S model in such an exquisite environment as the one created for us here at Sugarbush said Mick Pallardy, Porsches Area East Vice President.  It provides the vehicles with the perfect situation in which to demonstrate the truly confident everyday AWD characteristics of the 911, when properly equipped.   The Porsche Winter Driving Experience features both on-road and off-road testing of the Porsche vehicles. Sugarbush Resort Golf Club driving range will transform into an off-road track that features a slalom course, skid pad and hairpin turns to test the capabilities of the all-new 911 Carrera 4S. The road drive–a scenic route through Vermonts Mad River Valley on winding mountain roads, over covered bridges and past working landscapes– tests various Porsche vehicles in everyday winter conditions. The Porsche Panamera 4 and the Porsche Cayenne Diesel will also be available for driving. We are very excited to be partnering with Porsche on this event, and discover the limits of these fascinating sports cars, said President of Sugarbush Resort, Win Smith.The Porsche Winter Driving Experience at Sugarbush features morning and afternoon driving sessions. Each session includes guided driving by Porsche Sport Driving School instructors for both the on-road and track sessions. Guests of the event will lodge at the Clay Brook Hotel and Residences, Sugarbushs slopeside accommodations.Warren, VT (January 7, 2013) Sugarbush Resort,To introduce the all-new 911 Carrera 4S, Porsche Cars North America is joining forces with Sugarbush Resort in Warren, Vermont to host a unique winter driving program for prospective Porsche customers. The Porsche Winter Driving Experience will run from Jan. 22 27, 2013. The all-new 911 Carrera 4S features a 3.8-liter boxer engine that delivers 400 horsepower at 7,400 RPM and has a top track speed of 185 mph. The all-new 911 Carrera 4S combines power and winter driving performance with the intelligent Porsche Traction Management all-wheel drive system.last_img read more

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Caribbean chikungunya outbreak grows, poses threat to US

first_imgHealth officials are reporting a sharp rise in the number of patients sickened in a chikungunya fever outbreak centered on the Caribbean island of St. Martin, which may signal an increasing risk to the US mainland.On the French part of the island, where most of the infections have been reported, the number of confirmed cases has risen from 26 to 66, according to a Dec 28 update from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).In addition, health officials from the Netherlands have confirmed the first case on the Dutch side of St. Martin (Sint Maarten), and illnesses have been detected on two other nearby islands: three on Martinique and one on Guadeloupe, according to the ECDC report. Both of those islands are south and slightly east of St. Martin.The case in Guadeloupe represents the island’s first documented local chikungunya case, which was detected because of enhanced surveillance for the disease in all French Caribbean territories, the ECDC said. The patient is co-infected with dengue serotype 4 and had not recently traveled to another area where chikungunya exists.Meanwhile, health officials in the area are investigating a slew of suspected and probable cases. They include 167 suspected cases and 14 probable cases on the French side of St. Martin, and two patients have been hospitalized. Martinique has 27 suspected cases, and on the island of St. Barthelemy, 21 suspected cases are under investigation.The outbreak represents the first known indigenous transmission of chikungunya fever in the Americas. The ECDC said in its update that the outbreak underscores the recommendations it made earlier this month, urging health providers to heighten their vigilance against the disease, especially with increased travel during the holidays.Chikungunya is a viral disease spread mainly by Aedes aegypti and A albopictus mosquitoes. When symptomatic, it typically causes fever and arthralgia, similar to dengue.The outbreak in the Caribbean recently prompted two alerts from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—a Health Alert Network (HAN) notice to health providers and an advisory to travelers.Steps to minimize US threatErin Staples, MD, PhD, a medical epidemiologist with the CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in Fort Collins, Colo., told CIDRAP News that health officials are concerned that the chikungunya virus could gain a US foothold. Infected travelers who return home to the United States can introduce the virus into local A aegypti and A albopictus populations when bitten by the mosquitoes.It’s impossible to predict how the disease could spread in the United States, but there’s a chance health officials could see small, focal outbreaks, similar to small pockets of dengue fever infections that have been detected in areas such as those near Miami, she said. “We’re looking at this closely and staying on top of this.”The arrival of chikungunya fever in temperate areas of Europe in 2007 was a wake-up call that the virus could also surface in the United States, and the CDC has strengthened the ability of labs to detect the disease and has developed resources to allow clinicians to diagnose infections in patients, Staples said.She said two key strategies for minimizing the threat to the United States are to encourage travelers to wear insect repellent and take other precautions against mosquitoes and to boost awareness among health providers so that they can recognize the disease early, which could curb virus transmission to local mosquitoes. Vector control at mosquito breeding sites is another important tool, Staples added.See also:Dec 28 ECDC weekly communicable disease threat reportDec 13 CDC travel noticeDec 13 CDC HAN advisorylast_img read more

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Housing gloom hardened by weak lending

first_imgThe British Bankers Association said mortgage approvals for house purchase fell from 27,499 in May to 21,118 in June, 67% below numbers a year earlier. Net mortgage lending rose £3.8bn, well below the six-month average of £5bn.David Dooks, BBA statistics director, said the figures implied that the whole market, including non-bank lenders, would be at its least active since the early 1990s.A survey by the Bank of England’s regional agents showed how severely uncertainty over house prices was exacerbating the housing market slowdown sparked by tighter credit conditions.Some estate agencies reported that up to two-fifths of transactions were falling through, whether because sellers had refused a lower offer, lenders withdrawn a mortgage offer, or buyers pulled out through fear of losing capital. Financial Times, The Timeslast_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, March 1

first_imgThere are only two choices. One is to have a wall recognizing its true purpose.The other is to tear down the wall.So far, I have yet to see the governor, senators or representatives of California demanding the wall between Tijuana and San Diego be torn down.Andy Beiniks    Charlton The actual purpose of protective walls is to slow an intruder until a reaction force can arrive.  Why does a bank vault have thick concrete walls and a thick door? It’s to slow down someone trying to break in until the police arrive.If the police aren’t going to bother showing up, you could take a jackhammer to the walls of the bank branches on Route 50 in Glenville on a Sunday to leisurely break in and take the contents of the vaults.So-called technological solutions such as drones, motion detectors and video cameras really only work in conjunction with a physical barrier that establishes a final protective barrier.  If walls and fences are that ineffective, why does the military put up walls and fences around their compounds in Afghanistan and Iraq?If you choose to believe Ieva Jusionyte and other critics of the effectiveness of a wall, then you would believe that the military wasted a lot of time, effort and money building walls and fences in Afghanistan and Iraq to protect our forces. Plows put the snow back on sidewalksSara Foss’ Feb. 25 column was very interesting, regarding municipalities’ policy of clearing sidewalks.I’d like to add two things to her commentary: 1) The city of Schenectady does have at least one small sidewalk-sized snow machine, which it uses to clear certain city and county walks, sometimes.2) When my neighbors and I clear our walks on Guilderland Avenue, the city fills them back in.Snow plows travel up and down the street, usually well over the speed limit, and the very heavy snow and slush are thrown over the snowbanks, onto our sidewalks.Usually, the stuff freezes before we can get back out to re-shovel (not that it matters, the plows come by again after we do), but even when it doesn’t, the mixture from the streets is so heavy it isn’t worth trying to shovel it again, unless you have a physical therapist on speed dial.So the city has the capability of clearing the sidewalks.It really needs to do so after the homeowner has already cleared a path, and the city fills it back up again — as it has been doing for the more than 30 years I’ve lived on Guilderland Avenue.Kurt C. SiegelSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionsFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWall is designed to delay, not defeatThe opinion piece by Ieva Jusionyte on the effectiveness of the border wall, published on Feb. 24 shows a complete lack of understanding as to what a wall is supposed to accomplish.He states, “…no matter the design, the fence does not deter unauthorized migrants.”last_img read more

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Lords expose intellectual bankruptcy of LASPO Part 2

first_imgThe House of Lords debate which took place on 30 January revealed divided opinion on key issues in the proposed legislation in Part 2 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill. We now know the changes will be delayed. And emphasis was placed on the fact that the reforms are not actually ‘pure Jackson’ but only embody selected parts of Lord Justice Jackson’s report. For example, consider the replacement of after-the-event legal expenses insurance by ‘qualified one-way costs shifting’ (QOCS). Liberal Democrat Lord Thomas of Gresford made a damning attack on exclusion of QOCS from the bill in favour of its introduction via the Civil Procedure Rules. He said ‘…The Civil Procedure Rules will come out of the air from somewhere and will not have any proper parliamentary scrutiny. They will have been drawn up as a result of discussion between the Executive and the Civil Procedure Rule Committee, which is entirely made up of judges and lawyers. I would have thought that there would be a constitutional position. It is more serious than anything else in the bill.’ Crossbench peer Baroness Butler-Sloss agreed, saying: ‘Perhaps the minister will not mind if I add a very few words. I had not intended to intervene but, as a former chairman of a rules committee, I have to say that I have considerable faith in the good sense of the way in which it does its work. But the points that have been made are extremely relevant. It is not really the business of a rules committee to change something so dramatic.’ Lord Beecham pointedly said to Lord Wallace of Tankerness, who was representing the government: ‘Perhaps, as he develops his reply, he would deal with the point of restricting this significant change to personal injury cases when Lord Justice Jackson advocated it across the piece.’ This raises clear professional conduct issues for the lawyer members of the Civil Procedure Rule Committee. If the Ministry of Justice provides notice under the Civil Procedure Act 1997 that rules be put in place, then the committee is required to do so. On the other hand, if there is a risk that it is being asked to breach constitutional law by exceeding its legal powers, then it has an impossible conflict of interest. Clearly there is little likelihood that any civil procedure rules will be drafted until this issue has been decisively resolved. The Civil Justice Council confirmed to me by email on 31 January: ‘The Council was asked by the Ministry to come up with practical proposals on implementing QOCS (Part 36 and Proportionality). A working party was set up chaired by Alistair Kinley to look at these issues. The subsequent report was handed over to the Department in October; a workshop was convened to discuss the report attended by Departmental officials. The Council has had not been asked to carry out any further work since then’. Lord Prescott meanwhile, the former deputy prime minister, focused on the role and impact of the press and media in bringing about the reforms. He said: ‘A survey has just come out – I do not know whether members have seen it – of 16 press organisations. It was conducted by the MoJ. Question one was: “Do you agree that CFA success fees should not longer be recoverable from the losing party in any case?”. ‘The answer was: “Yes, for the reasons set out in the response enclosed. UK law also needs to be amended to comply with Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights” – and that is quite apart from being shattered from our people claiming the human rights when they are spending most of the time trying to defeat it. But the point is that there are 16 identical replies – every one of the replies from television, radio, the Guardian, the Mail, Sky, BBC, was exactly the same, to all 60 questions. All of a sudden, when they are usually divided about many issues, when it comes down to money, all 60 answers are that they should keep their position. Even the good old liberal Guardian sided with Dacre, for God’s sake – that takes a bit of thinking about. ‘They are now agreed that they should be able to keep more of their money, even though they are the ones that transgressed in this situation. ‘For those 16 to get together-some lawyer has written the answer to every one of them. If a trade union did that, we would be in trouble. It would be all over the front pages: “60 identical replies, it must be a conspiracy”. Of course it is a damn conspiracy. That they have come together in this survey to give exactly the same answers is perhaps not a crime, but it is near to it. They have the power for to do it.’ He went on to say: ‘Believe me, this press is not going to go away; it is still going to be committing the same offences. We have a Press Complaints Commission that is particularly useless and will continue to be unless we make fundamental changes. Anyone listening to the Leveson inquiry must hear that the press has not changed its mind; it is still going to go ahead and do the same things because that is how it sells newspapers.’ In what seemed to be a significant Conservative ‘about-turn’ Lord McNally replied: ‘We have to await the outcome of the Leveson inquiry.’ Alluding to the encouragement of ‘professional rogues’, Lord Bach observed: ‘It is only common sense that we should not seek to legislate for a system of litigation that allows professional people to prey on their impecunious and weak clients. The Committee today is full of professional people of one sort or another and the House is even more full of them when it is sitting. ‘As we all know, being in a profession is a privilege. When a professional takes on contractual fiduciary and moral duties to do their best to help their clients, they take on an important responsibility. We have professions in our society because we need experts who specialise, whether it is expertise in finance, in my example, the law, engineering or medicine. ‘They should know that society takes seriously if and when they act negligently, with malice, or breach their duty of care. Should we make it so difficult for the individual to take action and claim back their damages in full? Would that not have a corrosive impact on trust in the professions and their regulation, which is something that professions and the professionals themselves should not and do not welcome. ‘We think that the answer to this dilemma is to listen to what Lord Justice Jackson said and extend one-way costs shifting to all litigation, not just keep it to personal injury.’ He continued: ‘Should we fail to do this, and leave the bill unamended, the perpetrators of the Payment Protection Insurance mis-selling scandal – the mortgage mis-selling scandal of the 1980s and 1990s which noble Lords will remember – and thousands of other instances when rogue professionals have abused their position of trust, will go unpunished and unheard. ‘Their victims will multiply in a system where those who have been wronged are dissuaded from taking action against rogues, knowing that parliament will have legislated to substantially limit their rights to redress. It would be something of a rogues’ charter. ‘I end what I have to say about this amendment by citing the views of the president of the Professional Negligence Lawyers Association, who said that many litigants face the dilemma of having had their trust betrayed by one professional adviser and that their only redress by way of litigation is to risk remaining assets and perhaps insolvency by trusting another – meaning another professional adviser – to win their case. That is not a satisfactory position and we ask the government to think again.’ The government has already conceded that personal injury claims including claims against medical professionals will have the benefit of qualified one way costs shifting. However, the justification to sweep away recoverable success fees and ATE premiums from every other category of civil litigation without even providing ‘qualified one way costs shifting’ in their place is becoming harder and harder to understand. The legal aid cuts in Part I were all justified by the government’s need to cut the costs to the tax payer. The inability of the Conservatives to justify Part 2 (as seen above there is a clear difference in the Liberal Democrat position in the Lords) by reference to any savings to the taxpayer leaves open to speculation the question of they wish to bring about these reforms at all. Lord Prescott is the only one who seems to have an explanation. If he is right, then these reforms are being implemented for reasons of political expediency for which ordinary people – like us – are expected to sacrifice our ability to enforce our civil rights. It is perhaps mischievous to suggest that if the Conservatives would go this far – would they go one step further and reintroduce slavery? Katy Manley, is president of the Professional Negligence Lawyers Associationlast_img read more

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Bill Gates’ newest mission: Curing Alzheimer’s

first_img Bill Gates is leaving Microsoft and Berkshire Hathaway’s boards Bill Gates’ newest mission: Curing Alzheimer’s Published: November 13, 2017 8:28 AM EST SHARE NEW YORK (CNN) It’s one of the holy grails of science: a cure for Alzheimer’s. Currently, there is no treatment to stop the disease, let alone slow its progression. And billionaire Bill Gates thinks he will change that.“I believe there is a solution,” he told me without hesitation.“Any type of treatment would be a huge advance from where we are today,” he said, but “the long-term goal has got to be cure.”I had the chance to sit down with Gates recently to talk about his newest initiative. He sat in front of our cameras exclusively to tell me how he hopes to find a cure to a disease that now steals the memories and other cognitive functions of 47 million people around the world.For Gates, the fight is personal. He is investing $50 million of his own money into the Dementia Discovery Fund, a private-public research partnership focused on some of the more novel ideas about what drives the brain disease, such as looking at a brain cell’s immune system. It’s the first time Gates has made a commitment to a noncommunicable disease. The work done through his foundation has focused primarily on infectious diseases such as HIV, malaria and polio.I have interviewed Gates many times over the years, in countries around the world. He was more engaged on this topic of Alzheimer’s than I’ve ever seen before.Today, Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, where a new case is diagnosed every 66 seconds. More than 5 million Americans live with the disease, at a cost of $259 billion a year. Without any treatment, those numbers are projected to explode to 16 million Americans with the disease, at a cost of over $1 trillion a year, by 2050.“The growing burden is pretty unbelievable,” the tech guru-turned-philanthropist told me. It’s something he knows personally. “Several of the men in my family have this disease. And so, you know, I’ve seen how tough it is. That’s not my sole motivation, but it certainly drew me in.”When he said, “I’m a huge believer in that science and innovation are going to solve most of the tough problems over time,” I could feel his optimism.He told me he has spent the past year investigating and talking to scientists, trying to determine how best to help move the needle toward treatment of the disease itself rather than just the symptoms.A disease turns 100It has been more than a century since the disease was identified by German physician Dr. Alois Alzheimer. He first wrote about it in 1906, describing the case of a woman named “Auguste D.” Alzheimer called it “a peculiar disease,” marked by significant memory loss, severe paranoia and other psychological changes.But it wasn’t until Alzheimer performed an autopsy on her brain that the case became even more striking. He found that her brain had shrunk significantly, and there were unusual deposits in and around the nerve cells.It would take another 80 years for scientists to identify what those deposits were: plaques and tangles of proteins called amyloid and tau. They have become hallmarks of the disease.Both amyloid and tau are naturally occurring proteins that can be found in healthy brain cells. But in a brain with Alzheimer’s, something goes haywire, causing parts of amyloid proteins to clump together and block the cell’s messaging pathways. Eventually, tau proteins begin to tangle up inside the neurons.All of this contributes to a breakdown of the neural highway that helps our brain cells communicate. These changes in the brain can begin years before anyone starts actually exhibiting any symptoms of memory loss or personality changes.Until recently, it’s been a challenge to understand the disease, let alone identify who has it. The only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s is still after someone has died and their brain can be examined under the microscope, looking for the telltale amyloid plaques and tau tangles.A new hope“It’s gone slower than we all would have hoped. A lot of failed drug trials,” Gates told me. And he’s right. Since 2002, there have been more than 400 Alzheimer drug trials run and yet no treatments. There are some drugs prescribed to help with cognitive symptoms such as memory loss or confusion but nothing that actually targets Alzheimer’s.In the past five years, advanced imaging technology has allowed us to see tau and amyloid in living people.Dr. James Hendrix, who heads up the Alzheimer Association’s Global Science Innovation team, believes that this development is a game-changer. “You need good tools to find the right therapeutics,” he said.By identifying these biomarkers earlier, Hendrix told me, scientists can work on finding ways to prevent the brain from deteriorating.“If we can catch the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s, then we’re treating a mostly healthy brain, and keeping it mostly healthy. … It’s very difficult to repair the damage once it’s done,” he explained.Dr. Rudy Tanzi agrees that imaging has been essential in understanding the pathology of Alzheimer’s and potential treatments. Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard, has been at the helm of Alzheimer’s research, discovering several of the genes associated with the disease.He points out that one of the greatest faults with some of the trials has not been in the treatment itself but in the application: too late in the disease’s progression, when symptoms are already occurring. “It’s like trying to give someone Lipitor when they have a heart attack,” he explained. “You had to do it earlier.”Tanzi said we need to think about Alzheimer’s like cancer or heart disease. “That’s how we’re going to beat the disease: early detection and early intervention.”Think differentMost of the focus in Alzheimer’s research has been on tau and amyloid, what Gates likes to call “the mainstream.” With his donation, Gates hopes to spur research into more novel ideas about the disease, like investigating the role of the glial cells that activate the immune system of the brain or how the energy lifespan of a cell may contribute to the disease.“There’s a sense that this decade will be the one that we make a lot of progress,” Gates told me.Gates believes that it will be a combination of mainstream and out-of-the-box thinking that will lead to potential treatments in the near future.“Ideally, some of these mainstream drugs that report out in the next two or three years will start us down the path of reducing the problem. But I do think these newer approaches will eventually be part of that drug regimen that people take,” he said.Has looking into Alzheimer’s research caused Gates to worry about his own health?“Anything where my mind would deteriorate” is, he said, one of his greatest fears. He’s seen the hardship it has caused in his own family. “I hope I can live a long time without those limitations.”So Gates is now focused on prevention, by exercising and staying mentally engaged. “My job’s perfect, because I’m always trying to learn new things and meeting with people who are explaining things to me. You know, I have the most fun job in the world,” he said with a smile. Author: CNN Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Recommended Bill Gates explains how the US can safely ease coronavirus restrictions last_img read more

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Ravenna volleyball squad cruises past Fremont in three straight sets

first_imgShares $0.00 Bestseller Share LocalSportsJournal.comThe Ravenna volleyball squad cruised past Fremont 3-0 in a non-league match on Thursday night.The Bulldogs, who is now 10-2-1 on the season and 2-0 in league play, won the match with service scores of 25-14, 25-10 and 25-19.Amber Jacobs paced Ravenna with 19 kills, four aces and three blocks while Megan Crowley served up 29 assists.Hayley Lemkie also contributed for the Bulldogs with 14 digs.Ashley Jahr led Fremont with four kills, Lilly Williams had 11 digs and Mason Westgate contributed eight digs,Ravenna will participate at the Grandville Invitational on Saturday. Displayed poorly Displayed poorly Displayed poorly $9.99 Twelve Not relevant Displayed poorly $0.00 Bestseller Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Not relevant DEAL OF THE DAY Inappropriate / Offensive Other DEAL OF THE DAY Mail Ads by Amazon Nuun Sport: Electrolyte Drink Tablets, Citru… Bestseller Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. (3879) (32825) $14.99 Bestseller $0.00 Ads by Amazon Report a problem This item is… Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Inappropriate / Offensive DEAL OF THE DAY Share Shop Now DEAL OF THE DAY Bestseller Not relevant Add Comments (Max 320 characters) NBC Sports × Add Comments (Max 320 characters) DEAL OF THE DAY Displayed poorly Report a problem This item is… Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Bestseller Report a problem This item is… (832) Inappropriate / Offensive (35309) Other Add Comments (Max 320 characters) × $19.29 ENDS IN ×center_img DEAL OF THE DAY Bestseller $20.00$233.61 Other Not relevant DEAL OF THE DAY Inappropriate / Offensive Other Displayed poorly Not relevant Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Special… × Displayed poorly Report a problem This item is… × Bestseller Add Comments (Max 320 characters) ENDS IN Report a problem This item is… Inappropriate / Offensive Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Not relevant Inappropriate / Offensive (975) Sports Illustrated Report a problem This item is… (8133) ENDS IN ENDS IN Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. ENDS IN ENDS IN Not relevant Displayed poorly Other ENDS IN Lemedy Women Padded Sports Bra Fitness Wo… ENDS IN Inappropriate / Offensive Report a problem This item is… Other Other Not relevant DEAL OF THE DAY (1445) (5153) Report a problem This item is… $22.99 × × Inappropriate / Offensive Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Fox Sports Go × Other FOX Sports: Stream live NFL, College Footbal…last_img read more

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