2014 U.S. Open facts and figures

first_imgPINEHURST, N.C. — Facts and figures for the 114th U.S. Open golf championship:  Dates: June 12-15. Site: Pinehurst No. 2. The course: This is considered the masterpiece of Donald Ross, who completed Pinehurst No. 2 in 1907 and continued to refine it until his death in 1948. It has hosted the U.S. Open in 1999 and 2005. Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw renovated No. 2 three years ago by restoring the native sandy areas that were prevalent in the 1930s and 1940s, meaning this U.S. Open effectively will have no rough. Instead, players will face lies in sandy areas covered with loose vegetation and wire brush plants. Length: 7,562 yards Par: 36-34-70 Cut: Top 60 and ties after 36 holes. Playoff (if necessary): 18 holes on June 16. Field: 156 players Purse: TBA ($8 million in 2013). Defending champion: Justin Rose. Last year: Rose won his first major championship, closing with an even-par 70 at Merion for a two-shot victory over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. He became the first Englishman in 43 years to win the U.S. Open, finishing at 1-over 281. Mickelson had the 54-hole lead and reclaimed the lead by holing out for eagle on the 10th hole. But he made bogey twice with a wedge in his hand and closed with a 74. It was his sixth runner-up finish in the U.S. Open. Last time at Pinehurst No. 2: Michael Campbell of New Zealand closed with a 1-under 69 for a two-shot victory over Tiger Woods. He finished at even-par 280 and became the first Kiwi since Bob Charles in the 1963 British Open to win a major. Woods missed an 8-foot birdie attempt on the 16th hole and three-putted from 25 feet on the 17th hole to fall back. It was only the second time he finished runner-up in a major. U.S. Open champions at Pinehurst No. 2: Payne Stewart (1999), Michael Campbell (2005). Let’s play two: The U.S. Women’s Open will be held the following week on Pinehurst No. 2, the first time the men’s and women’s Opens have been contested in consecutive weeks on the same golf course. Noteworthy: Gary Player is the only one to complete the career Grand Slam at the U.S. Open. Quoteworthy: ”Someone could put you in the perfect place off every tee and it’s still the hardest course you’ve ever played.” – Geoff Ogilvy on Pinehurst No. 2. Key statistic: Tiger Woods won 30 percent of the majors he played through the 2008 U.S. Open. Since then, he has not played in 25 percent of the majors due to injury. Woods is recovering from back surgery and is not playing the U.S. Open. Television (all times EDT): Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., ESPN. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., NBC Sports; 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., ESPN2; 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., ESPN. Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., ESPN. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., NBC Sports. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., ESPN. Saturday and Sunday, noon to 7:30 p.m., NBC Sports.last_img read more

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Car firms fear the worst in Monti report

first_imgCar companies currently enjoy a special ‘block exemption’ from EU competition rules which allows them to operate exclusive dealerships. They won the exemption in 1995 after arguing that the system offered consumers a better choice of products and quality of service.But the industry’s EU lobby group ACEA says it expects Monti to heap fresh criticism on its members’ distribution methods in a report currently being finalised by his staff. Its conclusions will be crucial to the sector’s future as they will form the basis for the Commission’s decision on whether or not the exemption will be renewed when it expires in 2002.Monti served notice on the special treatment enjoyed by the industry earlier this year when he sided with critics who claim the system stops franchised dealers from competing with each other, closes the door to independent suppliers and allows the manufacturers to crank up prices. “The tone of the report should be about the same as what Monti said in May,” said an ACEA spokesman, who added that the industry was finalising its own submissions to competition officials on the issue.He also confirmed that Fiat chief executive Paulo Cantarella, the current president of ACEA, was holding regular talks with Monti and Commission President Romano Prodi to urge his fellow Italians to soften their stance. “It is obvious that he is having talks with Monti and Prodi…they are all Italians and they know each other well,” he said.EU sources said Monti’s report, expected in November, would not set out firm proposals for the future of the block exemption but would instead outline what the Commission believes is wrong with the present system.last_img read more

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Bar recommends 78 for JNC appointments

first_img Bar recommends 78 for JNC appointments The Bar Board of Governors has nominated 78 attorneys to fill upcoming vacancies on each of the state’s 26 judicial nominating commissions and forwarded the list to Gov. Rick Scott.The board, at its May meeting, picked a slate of three attorneys for each JNC and Scott will appoint one to each JNC for four-year terms beginning July 1.The JNCs review applicants for all vacancies on the Supreme Court and the district courts of appeal, and for mid-term vacancies on the trial courts within their respective circuits. Currently, the governor directly appoints five members of each JNC and chooses the other four members from slates nominated by the Bar.Here are the attorneys nominated for the various JNCs: • For the Supreme Court JNC, Cynthia A. Everett of Miami, Sheila M. McDevitt of St. Petersburg, and Israel Umberto Reyes of Miami. • For the First District Court of Appeal JNC, Michael J. Glazer of Tallahassee, Michael J. Korn of Jacksonville, and George T. Reeves of Madison. • For the Second DCA JNC, Thomas H. Dart of Sarasota, Henry C. Gyden of St. Petersburg, and Celene H. Humphries of Riverview. • For the Third DCA JNC, Timothy J. Koenig of Key West, Elliot H. Scherker of Miami, and Gilbert K. Squires of Miami Beach. • For the Fourth DCA JNC, Debra A. Jenks of Palm Beach Gardens, Shelley H. Leinicke of Ft. Lauderdale, and Gerald F. Richman of Palm Beach Gardens. • For the Fifth DCA JNC, R. Lee Bennett of Orlando, David A. Paul of Orlando, and Michael C. Sasso of Oviedo. • For the First Circuit JNC, Nathan C. Bess of Pensacola, Lennard B. Register III of Pace, and William R. Wade of Pensacola. • For the Second Circuit JNC, Elizabeth L. Bevington of Lamont, Robert N. Clark, Jr., of Tallahassee, and Kimberly A. Driggers of Tallahassee. • For the Third Circuit JNC, Conrad C. Bishop, Jr., of Perry, Marlin M. Feagle of Lake City, and Jerry D. Marsee of Lake City. • For the Fourth Circuit JNC, Courtney K. Grimm of Green Cove Springs, Robert E. O’Quinn, Jr., of Jacksonville, and Cherry Alice Shaw of Jacksonville. • For the Fifth Circuit JNC, Gordon J. Glover of Ocala, James T. Schatt of Ocala, and Janet R. Varnell of Summerfield. • For the Sixth Circuit JNC, Donald S. Crowell of Largo, Kimberly J. Gustafson of St. Pete Beach, and Scott F. Schiltz of Clearwater. • For the Seventh Circuit JNC, Steven N. Gosney of Ormond Beach, Katherine H. Miller of Daytona Beach, and Theodore W. Small, Jr., of DeLand. • For the Eighth Circuit JNC, Paul A. Donnelly of Gainesville, Richard M. Knellinger of Evinston, and Shannon M. Miller of Gainesville. • For the Ninth Circuit JNC, Elizabeth F. McCausland of Orlando, William C. Vose of Orlando, and Thomas A. Zehnder of Orlando. • For the 10th Circuit JNC, James Russell Franklin of Lakeland, Matthew E. Kaylor of Winter Haven, and Richard E. Straughn of Winter Haven. • For the 11th Circuit JNC, Melanie E. Damian of Miami Beach, Corali Lopez-Castro of Coral Gables, and Jeffrey Rynor of Miami Beach. • For the 12th Circuit JNC, Bonnie Lee A. Polk of Sarasota, Marjorie A. Schmoyer of Sarasota, and Varinia Van Ness of Sarasota. • For the 13th Circuit JNC, Alexander Caballero of Tampa, Kamilah L. Perry of Tampa, and Amanda A. Sansone of Tampa. • For the 14th Circuit JNC, Todd Clifford Brister of Panama City, Clifford Carlton Higby of Panama City, and William A. Lewis of Panama City. • For the 15th Circuit JNC, Richard M. Benrubi of Boca Raton, Sarah Cortvriend of North Palm Beach, and Anna Morales-Christiansen of Lake Worth. • For the 16th Circuit JNC, Natileene Cassel of Ramrod Key, Christine Limbert-Barrows of Little Torch Key, and Robert B. Schillinger of Key West. • For the 17th Circuit JNC, Terrence P. O’Connor of Lighthouse Point, Ian S. Seitel of Ft. Lauderdale, and Linda S. White of Ft. Lauderdale. • For the 18th Circuit JNC, Erin L. Greene of Longwood, Steven D. Kramer of Altamonte Springs, and Mark S. Peters of Rockledge. • For the 19th Circuit JNC, Alan Orantes Forst of Palm City, Robert J. Gorman of Ft. Pierce, and Harold G. Melville of Ft. Pierce. • For the 20th Circuit JNC, Kathleen M. Fitzgeorge of Ft. Myers, Jeffrey D. Fridkin of Naples, and Alison C. Hussey of Ft. Myers. Bar recommends 78 for JNC appointmentscenter_img June 15, 2012 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Lions WR Bruce Ellington reveals he had part of his hamstring removed

first_imgThe Lions receiver revealed that after he tore his hamstring in 2016, doctors told him he would likely injure it again and have scar tissue. So they made the choice to remove the semitendinosus, which is one of the three muscles that make up the hamstring.The semitendinosus is located at the back of the thigh and helps flex the knee and bend the hip. It easily makes up 33 percent of the hamstring. Related News Marvin Jones injury update: Lions WR (knee) could return vs. Rams Bruce Ellington is playing football without part of his hamstring. Seriously.“I don’t know if it’s fully recovered,” he said when he was asked if his hamstring has healed (via MLive.com), “because they removed it. So I don’t have it anymore.” It makes the fact that Ellington can walk, let alone play football, that much more remarkable.Ellington isn’t the first player to have the procedure, though. Former Texans wide receiver Andre Johnson had the surgery, and former NFL cornerback Jimmy Hitchcock played without both ACLs in his knees.Ellington just signed with the Lions and has recorded 12 catches for 80 yards in his two games with the team.last_img read more

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46 golfers qualify for Utah Open

first_imgFive golfers shot 65s to lead a group of 46 qualifiers for this week’s Utah Open golf tournament at Oakridge Country Club.Local pros Devin Daniels and Alexander Theodore joined out-of-state pros Nick Latimer, James Drew and Tom Glissmeyer with the 7-under-par rounds at Glen Eagle Golf Course in Syracuse.Four golfers, Dusty Fielding, Blake Moore, Zenon Brown and Robert Fillmore each shot 66, while Christopher Peterson came in at 67. Amateurs Devon Purser, Kelton Hirsch and McCoy Willey joined Kurt Watkins and Steele DeWald at 68. A score of 73 was needed to qualify for the Open.The annual tournament, sponsored by Siegfried and Jensen, will be played Friday through Sunday at Oakridge.ROCKY MOUNTAIN OPEN: Sandy’s Dustin Pimm edged another Sandy golfer, Steve Schneiter at the Enstrom Rocky Mountain Open Sunday at Bookcliff Country Club in Colorado.Pimm, a 25-year-old former University of Utah golfer, won the $8,000 first prize after forcing a playoff on the final hole and won on the first playoff hole.SLC SENIOR AM: Former State Amateur champion Todd Barker captured the Salt Lake City Senior Amateur at Rose Park Golf Course, defeating David Cannon by four strokes with a 134 total. Brent Marriott was third at 139.email: [email protected]last_img read more

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Drive to stamp out doping in South African sport

first_imgSAIDS has launched a campaign to rootout doping among South Africa’s athletes.(Image: Sports and Recreation) SAIDS’ Shuaib Manjra and sports ministerFikile Mbalula launched the campaign. SAIDS urged professional athletesto sign the campaign’s pledge.(Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Khalid GalantCEO, Institute for Drug Free Sport+27 21 761 8034Bongani NkosiThe South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) has launched a major campaign to raise awareness about illegal performance-enhancing substances and curb doping among local athletes.SAIDS introduced its “I Play Fair, Say No to Doping” campaign at a media conference in Johannesburg on 14 June 2011.“The core of our campaign is ‘I Play Fair’, let’s bring ethics back into sport,” said Shuaib Manjra, SAIDS chairperson.The drive, targeting professional and amateur athletes across the country, will provide education on banned substances and run actual doping tests. The campaign’s pillars are deterring, detection and prosecution, said Manjra.SAIDS’s latest statistics show that there has been a 100% increase in positive tests for doping over the last two years. The number jumped from 19 in 2009/10 to 50 in recent months. More than 2 000 athletes were tested in each year.Doping is an unacceptable practice that needs to be rooted out for the benefit of the country, said the Cape Town-based institute. The problem of doping is compounded by lack of broad knowledge on banned supplements in local athletics. Manjra conceded that some sports people were inadvertently taking the drugs.The Department of Sports and Recreation has thrown its weight behind the new campaign. “We support the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport in this regard to aggressively attack the use of drugs in sports,” said its minister, Fikile Mbalula.Mbalula will attend the Super Rugby match between the Bulls and Sharks at Loftus stadium in Pretoria on 18 June to raise awareness about the drive. His deputy, Gert Oosthuizen, will do the same at the clash between the Cheetahs and Stormers in Bloemfontein, also on 18 June.The government would like to see the campaign reaching out even to the “far-flung areas of our country”, said Mbalula. “It must be brought to the attention of everybody … that using drugs is cheating”.I Play Fair will also enter the realm of social media to reach its targets and campaign road shows are planned for the country’s rural areas.The South African Rugby Union became the first sports association to support SAIDS’s campaign. “We hope that more sports federations will endorse the initiative,” said Manjra.Bryan Habana, a Springbok wing, became the campaign’s first ambassador after signing its pledge.Schools’ permission neededSAIDS appealed to schools to give it permission to conduct doping tests among adolescents, as part of the campaign. The agency is to sign memoranda of understanding with academic institutions. “We’re willing to work with schools. All they have to do is come forward,” said Manjra.Parents are also urged to endorse testing in schools. “We have to intensify our awareness efforts, working with parents and young people,” said Mbalula.SAIDS’s initiative also has the backing of the World Anti-Doping Agency. Doping is a huge threat to sports all over the world and it’s critical that federations promote campaigns that deter the trend, the world body’s director general David Howman said in a statement.Regulating supplements sectorThe supplements manufacturing and distribution sector remains largely unregulated, according to SAIDS, and new legislation needs to be introduced.Lack of regulation is to blame for the general accessibility of supplements that contain banned drugs, like anabolic and prohormones stimulants.“This is an industry which is jeopardising the future of many of our athletes and we need to regulate it,” Manjra pointed out.SAIDS has launched its intelligence unit to uncover manufacturers and traffickers of illegal sports drugs. It alleges that these individuals are targeting unsuspecting athletes across the country.“We believe that every athlete who leaves the shores of the country to represent us is an ambassador of the country,” Manjra said.“We want a pledge from our athletes for clean play.”last_img read more

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idAuth: Proposed Push Identity-Data Relationship Standard

first_imgTags:#Lifestreaming#Product Reviews#web josh catone 1 Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… How can people be sure that a blog comment left by “Bill Gates” is from the real Bill Gates? How does your lifestream aggregator know? Web developer Kyle Brady, creator of lifestream aggregator OneSwirl, has proposed a system he calls idAuth that he thinks addresses this issue. idAuth is a “push” system for data that can be linked to a specific identity. Theoretically, it would allow lifestream aggregators to collect data from across the web without the need for RSS/Atom feeds, and verify the validity of the id of the data owner.There are two parts to idAuth: the part that verifies your identity, and the part that pushes anything you create once you’ve been verified back to your lifestream aggregation service. The spec would have to be supported on both ends (i.e., there would need to be support for idAuth on both the site or service you are creating new data, and by your lifestream aggregator).It works something like this: Let’s assume your lifestream aggregator supports idAuth. From within your aggregator, you specific a unique identifier that you’ll use around the web (such as OpenID or email address — it is important to note that while idAuth has low-level support for identity systems such as OpenID, it is using them only as an identifier, not for authentication). You’ll also specify some keys for use, such as “blog comments” or “readwriteweb.com blog comments” or “photos.” These details are then set in a cookie.When I add data to a service — which would also support idAuth — it searches for an idAuth cookie and then looks for an appropriate key. For example, ReadWriteWeb would search for a “readwriteweb.com” key or a “blog comments” key, Flickr might search for a “photos” key. Once it finds the right key, it packages the data you’ve entered and pushes it back to your lifestream aggregator (whose information is included in the idAuth cookie) in XML format, which the aggregator compares to your cookie to make sure the keys match and the data is valid. You can think of this as something akin to the trackbacks that blogs use to notify one another of links, with a layer of identity verification.It might seem that something like idAuth wouldn’t be necessary for Flickr — whose stream you verified as yours when you added it to your aggregator — but the idea here is that your lifestream aggregation service can collect data you create from anywhere on the web and verify that it was indeed you that created it. And you don’t have to add a million feeds into your aggregator (nor do they have to bake in support for a million different services), to get it done. That would be supremely useful for something like blog comments, which are very fragmented.Brady hopes that moving forward he can gain the support of some current lifestream aggregators, then start creating libraries for popular languages and plugins for popular blog clients. His entire proposal, which goes much more into depth about the technical specifics than this post, can be downloaded on his blog in PDF, Word, and OpenOffice formats. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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