Deatra (Deedy) Pistole- Candidate for Tiffin Township Fiscal Officer

first_img (This candidate’s information was accidentaly left out of our candidates in our Nov. 3 edition)Deatra (Deedy) Pistole–Candidate for Tiffin Township Fiscal OfficerI am very much interested in our community and want the best possible leadership for our Tiffin Township residentsFor 30 years I have worked in thePayroll/ Accounting field.  I have also owned two successful businesses of my own.  Thus, this position is right down my line of expertise.My plans/goals are to continue the excellent work ethics and leadership that our current Tiffin Township Fiscal Officer has set before me.Please vote for Deatra (Deedy) Pistole for Tiffin Township Fiscal Officer.  Thank you. Top Searches Top Searches TreaWinchesterUnsung Hero 10-21-2022 HomeNewsDeatra (Deedy) Pistole- Candidate for Tiffin Township Fiscal Officer Deatra (Deedy) Pistole- Candidate for Tiffin Township Fiscal OfficerNovember 3, 2019Mark CarpenterNews0 PreviousA really big fish storyNextLarry Gene “Pee Wee” Vest Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Powered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Mama’s Deviled EggsNOW PLAYINGBest Carrot Cake EverNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHomemade Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGApple Pie BitesNOW PLAYINGApple Pie Bites With Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYINGHow to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYINGHow to Melt and Soften ButterNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGParmesan Baked Pork ChopsNOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. last_img read more

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Electric Demand Set for Moderate Growth in EIA Long-Term Outlook

first_img 2.6.2018 By chloecox – Coal’s decline, which recorded a loss of 60 GW between 2011 and 2016, will become less sharp with an expected 65 GW lost through 2030. EIA expects coal to level off at a total of 190 GW through 2050. Electricity prices are set to stay relatively flat, ranging between 10.6 cents and 11.8 cents per kWh, depending on the amount of economic growth and the performance of oil and gas prices and availability. Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Nonhydro renewable generation is expected to grow by an average of 139 percent through 2050, with 94 percent coming from solar and wind. Total wind capacity is expected to increase by 20 GW, with solar increasing by 127 GW. Energy storage systems are set to grow by 34 GW. By Editors of Power Engineering No posts to display Previous articleAES to Reorganize, Consolidate UnitsNext articleSettlement Reached Over Kemper County Payments chloecox Natural gas will remain the top fuel source for generation in most scenarios, though a scenario with low oil and gas resources and technology would see it drop below coal and renewables. Electric Demand Set for Moderate Growth in EIA Long-Term Outlook Though electricity demand fell last year, the new long-term energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration indicated demand is set for an average annual growth of 0.9 percent through 2050.center_img However, the administration predicted direct-use generation will outpace the growth of utility-based generation thanks to rooftop solar and natural gas-fired combined heat and power systems. Linkedin TAGSSCE Facebook Twitter In all cases, generation costs are set to fall by 10 percent over the study period in response to low natural gas prices and increased generation from renewables. Transmission costs will grow 24 percent and distribution will grow 25 percent thanks to the need to replace aging infrastructure and accommodate new reliability standards. Nuclear energy, which remained nearly steady over the last decade, will start a continued decline thanks to lower revenues that will be especially sharp in the high oil and gas resource and technology scenario. On average, nuclear generation is set to fall from 99 GW now to 79 GW in 2050, with no new plant additions expected after 2020.  CoalEnergy StorageGasNuclearRenewablesSolarWind Vietnam: scaling back coal-fired plans toward gas, renewables Venture Global LNG adds Zachry to EPC team for Gulf export terminal construction Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale Linkedinlast_img read more

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Young woman abducted at birth still ‘loves’ her kidnapper and calls her ‘mom’

first_imgABCNews.com(WALTERBORO, S.C.) — She still calls the woman who kidnapped her at birth “mom,” and Kamiyah Mobley says she’s looking forward to the day when she walks out of prison.In her first interview since Gloria Williams, 52, was sentenced on Friday to 18 years in prison, 19-year-old Mobley told ABC News’ Good Morning America that she still “loves” Williams, visits her in prison and speaks to her on the phone several times a week.In fact, she lives in Williams’ Walterboro, South Carolina, home and is still getting acquainted with the biological mother and father, who spent years searching for her after Williams snatched her from a Jacksonville, Florida, hospital maternity ward in 1998 when she was just a few hours old.“We actually talked today,” she said of Williams. “I still do call her ‘Mom.’”She said Williams still treats her like a daughter.“Oh yeah, she calls and still gets on me. Yes, she does,” Mobley told GMA, while seated next to her lawyer, Justin Bamberg.She said she realizes there are people who will never understand why she still has affection for the woman who abducted her. But to those who don’t understand, she simply says, “They’ll be fine.”She said she’s paid many visits to her biological family in Florida, getting to know her real parents, Shanara Mobley and Craig Aiken, and the siblings she didn’t know she had until Williams was arrested for her kidnapping in 2017.“I’ve gone to Florida several times … and I call them. We talk almost every day,” Mobley said.“I like it. It’s new people who act just like you, they look just like you,” she said. “It’s almost just like extended family. You know, that’s really what it feels like.”She conceded, however, that it’s a balancing act to appease both her families. But since the court proceedings have ended, things have gotten easier.“It just looked like a dysfunctional family reunion. So I’m glad that we’re done with it cause it’s like this side is over here, this side is over here. This side hates this side. This side doesn’t want to talk to this side. It’s just too much.”She said that the times she did go to Williams’ court hearings, she usually sat in the back of the courtroom near the center aisle.“I actually got closure now,” she said. “Everything is done. No more court. No more back and forth.”In February, Williams pleaded guilty to walking into University Medical Center in Jacksonville on July 10, 1998, and kidnapping the infant. She posed as a nurse and took the baby from Shanara Mobley, then just 16 years old, telling her the child had a fever and needed to be examined.Williams, who suffered a miscarriage about a month before abducting the baby, immediately drove the infant to South Carolina, where she raised her as her own.“I know I wronged you and I’m so sorry,” Williams told Kamiyah’s birth parents during a court hearing last month. “So many days … I wanted to pick that child up and say, ‘Let’s get in this car and go’ — I just couldn’t.”Kamiyah Mobley said Williams was a good mother.“She was very open to all my friends I brought through that door,” she said of Williams. “She was one of those mothers, she was like open to sleepovers, open to company. Always smiling, always upbeat, up-tempo about everything. Very hard working, very hard working. She was actually getting her master’s [degree] before she was incarcerated.”Kamiyah said she wasn’t surprised that Williams was sentenced to 18 years on Friday during a hearing Williams asked her not to attend.“I kind of figured that,” she said of the sentence Williams received. “It was actually good … because at least I didn’t expect like eight and she got 18. I figured that was gonna happen. But I mean, she’ll still be alive. They didn’t give her like 30 or 45. She’ll come out walking and talking. It’s fine.”Kamiyah, who graduated from high school in 2016, has been busy working and doing a lot of paperwork, getting her social security number, birth certificate and trying to study to get her driver’s license.Bamberg, her attorney, said he’s witnessed Kamiyah cope admirably with a very complicated set circumstances.“It is what it is now, there are no more unknowns,” Bamberg said. “I’m proud of her.”Kamiyah said she plans on going to college someday and hopes “that I can find a better way to balance everybody and everything.”“Who wants to sit around and be sad all day?” she said. “I mean, it doesn’t help anything. It’s not going to change anything. I learned that a long time ago.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Amber Alert issued for 3-year-old girl allegedly abducted by woman in NC: Police

first_imgGreensboro Police Dept.(GREENSBORO, N.C.) — An Amber Alert has been issued for a 3-year-old girl who was reported abducted in North Carolina Wednesday, allegedly taken by a woman in her 20s, authorities said.Ahlora Ashanti Sample Lindiment was reported abducted at 6:33 p.m. Wednesday from the Phillips Avenue area in Greensboro, the Greensboro Police Department said.The 3-year-old was taken from a playground, reported ABC Raleigh station WTVD.“We are still in the process of developing information on the possible abductor and will be updating information throughout the day,” Greensboro Police spokesman Ronald Glenn told ABC News Thursday morning. “We have had resources working throughout the night continuing to gather information.”Ahlora’s mother, Erica Lindiment, is pleading with the public to help.“Even if you don’t want to be known, or you don’t want to have your name or anything to do with it, you can always leave an anonymous tip,” she told WTVD. “Help us find her and make sure she gets home safe.”Ahlora was last seen wearing a short sleeve pink T-shirt, black jeans and possibly white sandals, said police.The suspect is described as a black woman in her 20s who stands at 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighs about 135 pounds, said police. Her hair was in a short ponytail and she was wearing a short-sleeve black crop top with black pants with tiger print faces on them.Anyone with information is asked to call 911 or the Greensboro Police Department at 336-373-2287.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Outreach Specialist, SBTRC Grant

first_imgMiami Dade College, isaccepting applications for the position of OutreachSpecialist, SBTRC Grant. The Outreach Specialist providessupport and assists in planning, organizing and executing the U.S.Department of Transportation (USDOT) Office of Small BusinessTransportation Resource Center’s (SBTRC) marketing activities. Theposition coordinates outreach activities and provides counseling,coaching and training to Small Business concerns around governmentcontracting and certification.Duties and Responsibilities:Coordinates business counseling meetings and provides advice,strategies and tools centering on business growth anddevelopmentPlans SBTRC hosted events (workshops, trainings, meetings,etc.) that properly align with grant objectivesTravels to represent DOT SBTRC at conferences, meetings,workshops, trade fairs and seminarsServes as a liaison and interacts with external stakeholders tofoster relationships with agency and institutional partnersAssists with creating and coordinating web site content, mediareleases, reports, newsletters, and other medium advertisingprogram activitiesCollects data and reports activities in U.S.DOT CustomerRelationship Management systemMaintains confidentiality of data collection from externalclients served by the USDOT SBTRCRequirements:Bachelor of Arts degree in Marketing, Public Relations orrelated discipline from an accredited institution with three (3)years’ experience in government contracting, business development,training and coaching.To learn more about this and other positions at MiamiDade College visit us at www.mdc.edu/jobs.last_img read more

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Production Chef

Apply Before DateApril 30, 2021Contact InformationFor more information or questions about a job posting, pleasecontact the Department of Human Resources by phone at (912)478-6947 or by email at [email protected] Required QualificationsEducational RequirementsHigh school diploma or equivalent Required ExperienceOne (1) or more years of work-related experience Background CheckStandardOther InformationBelieving that diversity, equity, and inclusion contribute toexcellence in the workplace and to the quality of the University’sacademic environment, Georgia Southern University is committed torecruiting and retaining diverse faculty and staff to support,promote, and serve a diverse student body and promote InclusiveExcellence. Candidates from historically underrepresented groups,whose work furthers the institution’s Inclusive Excellence goals,and who bring to campus varied life experiences, perspectives andbackgrounds are especially encouraged to apply. For technical support, please call the Shared Services Center at(877) 251-2644 or [email protected] of EmploymentGeorgia Southern University is a Tobacco and Smoke-FreeCommunity.Successful completion of background investigation and legalauthorization to work in the US prior to employmentMust be able to perform duties and responsibilities with orwithout reasonable accommodation. Proposed Salary$23,700 – $26,050Required Documents to AttachPlease provide three (3) professional references in theRequired Documents to Attach section on your application. SKILLSDemonstrate appropriate organizational skills as required forspecific positionUse effective communication and human relations skillsDemonstrate commitment to inclusiveness by working well withdiverse populations Offers of employment are contingent upon completion of backgroundinvestigation including a criminal background check demonstratingyour eligibility for employment with Georgia Southern University,as determined by Georgia Southern University in its solediscretion, confirmation of the credentials and employment historyreflected in your application materials and, if applicable, asatisfactory credit check. Applicants may be subject to apre-employment drug test.Offers are made expressly subject to the applicable federal andstate laws, to the statutes, rules and regulations of thisinstitution and to the Bylaws and Policies of the Board of Regents(BOR) of the University System of Georgia (USG), which areavailable for your inspection upon request.Equal Employment OpportunityGeorgia Southern University provides equal employment opportunitiesto all employees and applicants for employment without regard torace, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, national origin, religion, age, veteran status,political affiliation, or disability. Individuals in need ofreasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Actto participate in the search process should notify Human Resources:(912) 478-6947.Other InformationMust be able to perform duties and responsibilities with orwithout reasonable accommodation.May be required to be able to lift up to 25 lbs. with orwithout accommodationWalk, bend and stand throughout dayWorkweek may extend beyond 40 hours to evenings andweekendsMay be required to work holidays and special events Knowledge, Skills, & AbilitiesABILITIESDemonstrated ability to work with limited supervisionConsistently exhibit engaging customer serviceNavigate web access and email with or without reasonableaccommodationPrepare food according to health and safety requirements KNOWLEDGEKnowledge of use of food service equipmentKnowledge of safe food handling techniques and toolsKnowledge of basic cooking techniques such as sauteing,broiling, frying, and grilling, seasoning methods and portioncontrolAdhere to University policies and procedures to meetInstitutional goals and support University’s mission for studentsuccess To apply, visit https://careers.hprod.onehcm.usg.edu/psp/careers/CAREERS/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=39000&JobOpeningId=226144&PostingSeq=1 Production ChefJob ID: 226144Location: Georgia Southern – SavannahFull/Part Time: Full-TimeRegular/Temporary: RegularAbout UsJoin Our Team at Georgia Southern!Georgia Southern is a dynamic university with three vibrantcampuses in Hinesville, Savannah and Statesboro serving thecommunities in Southeast Georgia. As a Carnegie Doctoral/R2institution, our world-class scholars instruct about 26,000students in associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral leveldegree programs. Whether you are seeking the charm of a small town,the traditions of a historical/urban destination near the beach orsupporting our military service members and their families, GeorgiaSouthern offers its faculty and staff the best of all worlds!Beyond an ideal location, there is a place for you to work in anexciting environment abounding with opportunities for personal andprofessional growth. We are steeped in tradition and devoted toacademic distinction in teaching, scholarship and service. In 2018Forbes Magazine listed Georgia Southern, along with 10 otherGeorgia companies or institutions, as one of America’s Best MidsizeEmployers. Georgia Southern University is passionate about servingour region while preparing our students to be lifelong scholars,leaders, and responsible stewards of their communities and theworld.LocationArmstrong CampusDepartment Information2320601 – Armstrong-GalleyJob SummaryThe Production Chef ensures preparation of excellent food andexceptional customer service within the dining facility; monitorssanitation practices to ensure employees follow standards andregulations; and offers support and direction to student andtemporary employees.ResponsibilitiesPerform related duties as assigned to support the mission ofthe UniversityPrepare food using techniques such as cooking, roasting,baking, and the preparation of skillet meals.Ensure compliance with menus, recipes, production schedules,and quality standards.Participate in daily testing of foods.Complete preparation assignments for next day’s menu.Serve clients during special events and work in otherdepartments/locationsClean equipment and perform other sanitation duties jeid-87110ab7ce7a95419ca35f418ab0bdf1 read more

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Where is Trump’s Cabinet? It’s anybody’s guess

first_imgPruitt isn’t the only Cabinet member holding unpublicized meetings with businesses or groups who have a stake in his decisions.While the Interior Department readily provides calendars after the fact for Secretary Ryan Zinke, it doesn’t publish his schedule ahead of time for events such as a September speech to the National Petroleum Council, whose members include companies that drill for oil and gas on federal land. (He made headlines that day by declaring that 30 percent of Interior employees aren’t “loyal” to his and Trump’s agenda.) It also issued no advance notice of political fundraisers he attended in Alaska, Montana and the Caribbean that are now under investigation by government watchdogs.“These are top public officials who work for the U.S. citizens” — Sean Moulton, manager at the Project on Government OversightIn August, after Zinke’s wife tweeted photos showing her and him relaxing along the Bosporus, an Interior spokesperson would not say when the secretary was returning or whether the trip to Turkey was a vacation.Similarly, when then-Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price went to an Ohio drug manufacturer in April as part of a listening tour about the opioid epidemic, Price only tweeted about the trip once he had already visited. HHS’s press office also didn’t email national news organizations about the trip until two days later — after he published an op-ed in the Cincinnati Enquirer that mentioned it.Since Sept. 29, when Price resigned following POLITICO’s revelation that he had charged taxpayers for at least $1 million in private and military flights, HHS has refused to publish schedules for acting Secretary Eric Hargan. Department employees responding to POLITICO’s request for Price’s calendars have said they’re swamped with FOIA requests they’re working to fulfill. Cabinet members who have immense security concerns are far more open about their plansAgency officials offer varying explanations for holding onto this information, including previous statements by EPA and the Education Department that they’re concerned about security. EPA staff says Pruitt has gotten an unusually high number of death threats — several times more than former Obama’s agency chiefs received — while DeVos’ staff notes that her public appearances have drawn protesters, including a crowd that briefly blocked her from entering a D.C. middle school in February.On the other hand, Cabinet members who have immense security concerns are far more open about their plans, including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, whose offices issue daily advisories to the media about their meetings.Pruitt and DeVos also don’t lack for protection: Each has a round-the-clock security entourage, unusual by the standards of their predecessors. DeVos’ security detail, projected to cost as much as $6.54 million during the current fiscal year, consists of U.S. marshals. Pruitt maintains tight secrecy even when he’s in his headquarters a few blocks from the White House, according to news reports that say he restricts employees’ access to his office area, ordered a $25,000 soundproof communications chamber installed in his office and recently had his office swept for bugs.* * *For some of Trump’s Cabinet appointees, who include wealthy business executives with little exposure to the often-harsh scrutiny of public life, secrecy may be less about hiding a policy agenda than about discomfort with the spotlight. This information clampdown is occurring with little oversight by Trump’s White House, which said only that agencies should follow the law when it comes to deciding what information to release.“The White House does not issue guidance specifically addressing the daily schedules of Cabinet agency heads,” Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley said in a statement. On the other hand, he added, “The White House expects federal agencies to comply with FOIA requests.”“How officials spend their time is the best window into what their priorities are” — Austin Evers, head of watchdog group American OversightGovernment watchdog groups and activists who closely follow the departments’ policies say the secrecy is more than just a Trumpian swipe at political enemies and a meddlesome news media: It’s an attempt, they say, to conceal the special access that some powerful interests have gotten in shaping policies that directly affect them.“How officials spend their time is the best window into what their priorities are,” said Austin Evers, a former Obama State Department lawyer who heads the watchdog group American Oversight, which has sued for the calendars of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. “When public officials resist public disclosure of what they do, people should be skeptical of what they’re trying to hide.”* * * Hiding information ultimately harms the agencies themselves, said Christine Todd Whitman, who led EPA during Bush’s first term and said she posted her schedule for the entire EPA staff to see and made reporters aware when she was traveling.“It all leads to an atmosphere of distrust, even if you’re doing absolutely nothing wrong” — Christine Todd Whitman, who led EPA during Bush’s first term“It all leads to an atmosphere of distrust, even if you’re doing absolutely nothing wrong,” Whitman said.She added that she is wary of Pruitt’s secrecy and has been “startled” by his frequent meetings with industry. “I worry about meeting with people who might have enforcement action coming before the agency, and, on the flip-side, seeming at this point to be locking out the environmentalists, because you’ve got to hear from both sides,” she said.Under Obama, Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s staff emailed reporters a schedule of his upcoming week of activities on Fridays. DeVos, in contrast, provides a much sparser public schedule that often omits meaningful details about the vast majority of her meetings.The Department of Homeland Security also released weekly alerts during the Bush and Obama eras for the news media about its secretary’s events, even if it wasn’t always complete. Under Trump, DHS has yet to issue such schedules on a regular basis, although its staff will confirm information about specific events. The Cabinet members carrying out President Donald Trump’s orders to shake up the federal government are doing so under an unusual layer of secrecy — often shielding their schedules from public view, keeping their travels under wraps and refusing to identify the people and groups they’re meeting.A POLITICO review of the practices of 17 Cabinet heads found that at least seven routinely decline to release information on their planned schedules or travels — information that was more widely available during the Obama and George W. Bush administrations. Three other departments — Agriculture, Labor, Homeland Security and Education — provide the secretaries’ schedules only sporadically or with few details. The Treasury Department began releasing weekly schedules for Secretary Steven Mnuchin only in November.In addition, at least seven Cabinet departments don’t release appointment calendars that would show, after the fact, who their leaders had met with, what they discussed and where they traveled — a potential violation of the Freedom of Information Act, which says agencies must make their records “promptly available to any person.” At least two departments — Education and the Environmental Protection Agency — have released some of those details after activist groups sued them. The barebones records released to date offer some clues, however: In May, for instance, Pruitt met with executives from an automotive company, Fitzgerald Truck Sales, to discuss an Obama-era air pollution rule for refurbished heavy trucks, according to the calendars obtained by American Oversight. Six months later, Pruitt agreed to weaken the rules, as the company had requested.The partial meeting records released to date reveal similar meetings Pruitt has held with auto executives affected by his upcoming decision on whether to ease greenhouse gas requirements for cars and trucks; coal mining and power executives opposed to Obama-era regulations on their industries; and developers that received Pruitt’s approval to seek a permit for a proposed gold and mineral mine in Alaska, according to documents previously obtained and analyzed by The New York Times and The Washington Post.At least three watchdog and environmental groups have filed separate suits seeking detailed copies of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s calendars | Pete Marovich/Getty ImagesAlarmed that many more such examples must exist, at least three watchdog and environmental groups have filed separate suits seeking detailed copies of Pruitt’s calendars. The Times and reporter Eric Lipton filed a similar suit against EPA this month, arguing in court documents that calendars are “often the only way the public has visibility into who provides Administrator Pruitt with input as he devises policy positions that affect all Americans.”Pruitt “uses the word transparency a lot,” said Ann Weeks, legal director for the Clean Air Task Force, an environmental group not involved in the suits. But she added, “To whom is the transparency being offered? Because it’s not the American people because we’re not able even to see who he’s talking to.”EPA spokeswoman Liz Bowman calls the criticism baseless, arguing that the agency is providing more information to the public than past administrations, “despite lawsuits from The New York Times for the sake of scoring political points and making headlines.” As evidence, she cites actions such as listing EPA’s upcoming regulatory actions online — as required by law — as well as a posting a public online calendar for Pruitt that often omits the name of the people he’s meeting with and the topic of discussion.“The fact is that the current EPA is the most transparent EPA has been in years,” Bowman said. The departments of Commerce, Energy, Transportation and Veterans Affairs and the office of U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer also do not release advance schedules for their leaders.“These are top public officials who work for the U.S. citizens, and they have a right to know who they’re meeting with and what they’re doing,” said Sean Moulton, the open government program manager at the Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group.* * *Several of the Trump agencies’ policies on releasing schedules and calendars are notably more restrictive than either the Obama or George W. Bush administrations — though they, too, faced criticism for lack of transparency.Former Vice President Dick Cheney won a court battle to avoid having to disclose details about his energy task force’s meetings with industry executives, rejecting a challenge by the Sierra Club and the conservative group Judicial Watch. Under Obama, The Associated Press sued the State Department for copies of former Secretary Hillary Clinton’s calendars. The department said at the time that it was coping with a load of records requests but “does its best to meet its FOIA responsibilities.”More than 40 journalism and watchdog organizations also objected in 2015 to what they called a growing array of “constraints on information in the federal government” under Obama, including agencies that prohibited rank-and-file staff from talking to reporters. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos provides a much sparser public schedule that often omits meaningful details about the vast majority of her meetings.Obama Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx not only provided his weekly schedule in advance but held monthly question-and-answer sessions with reporters. Trump’s DOT chief, Elaine Chao, declines to provide advanced schedules, and has yet to hold this type of session in Washington, D.C.Bush’s environmental agencies also publicized any events where leaders would speak publicly, said Jim Connaughton, who headed the White House Council of Environmental Quality at the time. And under Obama, then-EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy noted that her office provided a week-ahead guidance about her activities and regularly published her calendars after the fact.“When we were delayed at all, we would certainly hear from reporters,” McCarthy said.But the Energy Department didn’t publish then-Secretary Ernest Moniz’s schedules when Obama was in the White House — and doesn’t publish them for Secretary Rick Perry now.The Project on Government Oversight has called for years for Cabinet-level secretaries to at least publish their calendars online, calling it “the fundamental floor of wh+at all agencies should be disclosing.”“It has been hit or miss, even under the Obama administration,” Moulton said. But he said the Trump White House set the tone when it announced in April that it would refuse to publish its visitor logs on the grounds of “national security risks and privacy concerns,” breaking with the Obama administration’s policy. (POLITICO has responded by publishing its own unofficial White House visitor log, based on publicly available information.)center_img In late December, Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta issued only an after-the-fact news release when he visited hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, pictured left, was slow to begin releasing his weekly schedule | Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesSome agencies, including the departments of Justice, Agriculture and Housing and Urban Development, provide partial guidance about their secretaries’ schedules, either to the public or on background or off-the-record for the media. HUD, for example, usually provides reporters with an emailed heads-up about Secretary Ben Carson’s official events, although it doesn’t publicize all his appearances — his schedule didn’t include his attendance at last month’s opening of the Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., for instance.Even the less-forthcoming agencies insist that they’re following the law and keeping the public informed.“Every official event that is open to the public is posted on the Secretary’s public schedule,” Education Department press secretary Liz Hill wrote in a response to questions. “There isn’t a ‘transparency issue’ simply because members of the media want more of a head’s up.”“[Pruitt] may be working on something that is the best interest in the United States that would not be doable if the other side were to find out about it” — Jim Inhofe, Republican senatorEven so, Hill confirmed that security is a factor as the department plans and issues information on DeVos’ public schedule. Pruitt’s admirers even praise him for stiff-arming reporters’ request for information: A story Dec. 15 in The Weekly Standard — which EPA’s press office distributed by email hours later — lauded Pruitt’s “fearless defiance of his political and media foes.” The story’s first paragraph notes that POLITICO and The New York Times ask EPA for Pruitt’s upcoming schedule every week, and “the press office ignores the emails.”Senator Jim Inhofe, a Republican ally from Pruitt’s home state of Oklahoma, said the EPA chief has “a job to do and he doesn’t want to be distracted on everything.”“He may be working on something that is the best interest in the United States that would not be doable if the other side were to find out about it,” Inhofe said.* * *While the law doesn’t compel agencies to create advance schedules for the news media, the Freedom of Information Act does require them to turn over records such as their leaders’ appointment calendars after the fact. Congress also amended FOIA in 2016 to require agencies to automatically make available any records they anticipate would be in high demand — a category some legal experts say includes the calendars of agencies’ top officials.“There should be and there is a way to do this proactively” — Kevin Goldberg, lawyer focusing on First Amendment  DeVos, the billionaire charter-school activist who never before held public office, puts some of her events on social media but leaves them out of her department’s official communications with the news media.People following her online might have known she had met with the Saudi education minister in October — based on a photo she posted on Flickr — but the department never issued any information about it or said what they had discussed. The state-run Saudi Press Agency was more forthcoming, disclosing that the leaders had talked about “the importance of educational cooperation” between their countries’ universities.In November, DeVos visited Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., where she said in a later post on Instagram that she learned about education for the deaf and hard of hearing. The Education Department issued no advisories before or after the event.Even the less-forthcoming agencies insist that they’re following the law and keeping the public informed.DeVos’ public schedule is riddled with so many omissions that U.S. News and World Report lamented in October that “civically engaged citizens” would have had no way of knowing she planned to speak at a Future Farmers of America convention in Indianapolis, attend a round table on students with disabilities or make a March visit to a Catholic school in Orlando. Her calendars released to date are also rife with meetings with charter school advocates, voucher supporters and religious leaders, The New York Times reported in October based on records obtained by American Oversight.Mnuchin, the former Goldman Sachs partner turned Treasury secretary, was slow to begin releasing his weekly schedule — in contrast to former Obama Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, who put one out every day. In June, when Mnuchin talked regulations and tax reform with former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke at the Brookings Institution, the public’s first clue came when Mnuchin tweeted about it afterward. Criticisms that some agency heads are concealing meetings with businesses they’re supposed to regulate have been leveled especially often against Pruitt, a former Oklahoma attorney general who has made it his explicit mission to ease regulatory burdens on industries including oil, gas, coal, auto manufacturing and agriculture.Pruitt meets frequently with leaders of these and other industries, based on the three months of detailed calendar records that American Oversight managed to pry out of EPA under a court order. But the agency makes it difficult to track his activities in real time — refusing to provide schedules or advisories of his upcoming meetings, confirm his attendance at specific events, or say what city he plans to be in on a given day.“[Pruitt] uses the word transparency a lot. To whom is the transparency being offered? Because it’s not the American people” — Ann Weeks, legal director for the Clean Air Task ForceRecent events that EPA refused to disclose ahead of time include a speech Pruitt delivered at a fuel marketers’ conference in Chicago co-sponsored by BP, whose U.S. oil and gas interests are governed by EPA regulations. Pruitt’s staff wouldn’t even say where he was headed that day, after POLITICO asked about a tip that he was seen sitting in first class on a Delta Air Lines flight.Earlier this month, EPA wouldn’t disclose information about a dinner discussion that Pruitt was holding with a pro-business think tank in D.C. It gave no advance notice that he was traveling to Morocco on a trip that included a discussion of the country’s interesting in importing U.S. natural gas, a fuel source his agency helps regulate. EPA also wouldn’t confirm that Pruitt was scheduled to speak this month in Nashville before the American Legislative Exchange Council, a conservative policy organization — even though the printed program listed him as a lunchtime speaker. (ALEC later said Pruitt had canceled.)Even after the fact, EPA resists releasing the detailed calendars that would make it easier for journalists and watchdogs to track how often Pruitt meets with business leaders before making decisions that benefit their bottom lines. Moulton, of the Project on Government Oversight, called it “troubling” that agencies have forced groups to resort to litigation to obtain records that have long been recognized as subject to FOIA.“There are simple and complex requests,” he said. “This should be one of those simple requests.”Anthony Adragna, Caitlin Emma, Nick Juliano, Lauren Gardner, Kathryn Wolfe, Ben Lefebvre, Alex Guillén, Darius Dixon, Wesley Morgan, Jacqueline Klimas, Rachana Pradhan, Josh Gerstein, Ted Hesson, Lorraine Woellert, Margaret Harding McGill, Patrick Temple-West, Doug Palmer, Adam Behsudi, Connor O’Brien, Catherine Boudreau, Helena Bottemiller Evich, Ian Kullgren and Andrew Restuccia contributed to this report. Also On POLITICO Republicans warn Trump of 2018 bloodbath By Alex Isenstadt Impeachment debate divides US Democrats By Kyle Cheney and Heather Caygle “People have a right to know what officials are doing day to day,” said Kevin Goldberg, a lawyer focusing on First Amendment and FOIA issues at the Washington firm of Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth. He added, “There should be and there is a way to do this proactively. … It doesn’t seem to make sense that in 2017 we can’t get that right.”Congress told agencies in the 2016 law to hew to a presumption of openness, but that command has been slow to take hold. Goldberg, whose clients include the American Society of News Editors and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, said it’s too soon to say whether the lag is because of typical bureaucratic inertia or ill intent from the Trump administration.But Goldberg said the administration has sent some worrying signals. Those include the Justice Department’s lag in carrying out a late-Obama-era proposal to implement a “release to one, release to all” policy for FOIA records. Under that policy, any documents an agency releases under FOIA would be automatically made available to everybody.Margaret Townsend, a lawyer for the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the environmental groups suing EPA, argued that it’s also illegal for agencies to create two sets of calendars — a barebones one for media and public consumption, and a more detailed set for internal use — and then refuse to provide the latter in response to FOIA requests. But EPA appears to be doing just that.Sean Moulton, of the Project on Government Oversight, called it “troubling” that agencies have forced groups to resort to litigation to obtain recordsEPA has declined several requests to offer an on-the-record explanation of its refusal to release the calendars. In court documents responding to lawsuits, the agency described American Oversight’s FOIA request as “overbroad” and said EPA staff had conversations about what the Environmental Defense Fund was seeking for several months before the activist group filed suit.last_img read more

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1 Dead, 1 Rescued in Ohio Trench Collapse

first_imgHUDSON, Ohio – One worker was killed and another has been rescued after the collapse of a sewer line trench at a residential construction site in northeast Ohio.Fire Chief Bob Carter of Hudson says the trench collapsed late Wednesday morning in the city southeast of Cleveland. The survivor was pulled from the trench in the afternoon about six hours after the collapse, and the victim’s body was removed by early evening.Their names were not released.The survivor, whose injuries didn’t appear life-threatening, was taken to MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland.last_img read more

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Bee-harming Pesticides Banned in Europe

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreBees are vital — because of their pollination in the fields — to any nation’s food production and to Europe’s agricultural industry worth €22 billion annually.That’s why Europe has voted to enforce the world’s first continent-wide ban on common insecticides linked to serious harm in bees. The landmark European commission vote on Monday led to a victory for millions of environment campaigners concerned about dramatic declines in bees and bolstered by experts at the European Food Safety Authority who advised the move.(READ the story in the Guardian)Photo by Sun StarAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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BASEBALL: Lamar shows positives in loss to UTRGV

first_img Next UpIngram started the night off with a bang, singling over his shortstop counterpart to lead off the first. That inspired a first pitch moonshot to right field from Chase Whetsel scoring both and giving the Cards a 2-0 lead after one in Vincent-Beck Stadium. Big Red held that advantage through three innings and came within a few inches of growing that lead in the first, second, and third, stranding five base runners thanks to nifty infield defense for UTRGV.The Vaqueros jumped ahead in the fourth. An interesting strike zone led to singles by the first three UTRGV batters in the inning, and a walk followed with the bases loaded, giving UTRGV its first run of the game. A single allowed another Vaquero run to come home, and a double scored two more for UTRGV. Ingram caught a line drive and threw home to beat the runner on third for a double play to end the inning, but UTRGV held a 4-2 lead heading into the bottom of the fourth.Lamar had at least one base runner in four of the final six innings but couldn’t push any of those six runners across. UTRGV scored one more on an error, two singles, and a balk on a disputed timeout to set the final score: UTRGV 5, Lamar 2. BEAUMONT – The final score of 5-2 might be misleading, but there was evidence that Lamar (3-8) was beginning to put the pieces of the 2018 season’s puzzle together Friday night in a loss against the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (6-4).Senior Phil Ingram went 3 of 4 on the night, and freshman Chet Jones threw three scoreless innings to close the game for the Cardinals.“We’ve been through the ringer here with 11 games in 15 days,” said head coach Will Davis. “It’s been a lot to ask some of these young guys. When you have a bad game, you’ve got to answer the bell the next day. That’s tough, especially for young hitters. We’re asking nine freshmen and a sophomore to do all this, and when they have a bad game they all have to go back out there and do it again the next day. There’s no time to clear your head, and I think that’s contributed to some of the issues we’ve had.” “I am encouraged,” said Davis. “If it was a lack of talent I’d be worried, but it’s just a lack of experience. We’re going to keep running them out there, and we’ve seen improvement. Chase Kemp has been swinging it a bit better the past few days, and good things are on the horizon for him. The future is bright here. They’re the top-ranked recruiting class, but they’re still freshmen. That’s what we’re dealing with. We have 18-year-olds playing 22-year-olds.”Southpaw Noah Sills (2-0, 0.00 ERA) will start for Lamar in today’s game, scheduled for a 2 p.m. start in Vincent-Beck Stadium. He’ll face UTRGV’s left-hand pitcher Jorge Flores (1-1, 14.54 ERA).last_img read more

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