Vivendi battle rages on with Bollore under fire

first_img Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofNew England Patriots’ Cam Newton says no extra motivation from Mac Jones’SportsnautHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofBaked Sesame Salmon: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Express KCS Vivendi battle rages on with Bollore under fire whatsapp whatsapp Sharecenter_img Show Comments ▼ Monday 30 March 2015 8:33 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyBridesBlushThis Is Why The Royal Family Kept Quiet About Prince Harry’s Sister BridesBlushOpulent ExpressHer Quadruplets Were Born Without A Hitch. Then Doctors Realized SomethingOpulent ExpressTotal PastAfter Céline Dion’s Major Weight Loss, She Confirms What We Suspected All AlongTotal Past A BATTLE for the future of Vivendi heated up yesterday after US hedge fund P. Schoenfeld Asset Manage­ment (PSAM) took aim at group chairman Vincent Bollore.In a statement, PSAM accused the billionaire of putting his own interests ahead of those of other shareholders. The latest salvo comes after Bollore announced last Thursday he had expanded his stake in the company from eight to 10 per cent by purchasing €632m (£461m) worth of shares. PSAM expressed its annoyance at the move, which it labelled “opportunistic”, saying it could leave Vivendi under de facto control of Bollore Group without paying other investors a control premium for their shares. There is particular concern over the so-called Florange law, which could give Bollore double voting rights on the basis of his long-term holding in the company. Bollore, who became chairman in 2013, has overseen a radical restructuring of the company that has seen Vivendi sell off four of six divisions and exiting telecoms. The company maintains that some of the cash from these disposals needs to be retained in order for the company to grow into a media giant. But PSAM rejects this, saying the lack of cash going to shareholders and Vivendi’s “vague guidance” on acquisition plans means it is asking investors “to have blind faith” in the plans. Vivendi warned PSAM last Friday that any attempts to co-ordinate with other disgruntled shareholders could breach a French law which limits foreign ownership of TV broadcasters to 20 per cent. This law could apply to the media organisation through its state-issued licence to operate pay-TV service Canal Plus. The current dispute marks a new front in long-running dispute between the hedge fund, which owns 0.8 per cent of the company, and Vivendi’s management. PSAM has been pushing for a share buyback at the firm and last December wrote to the board, urging members to sell off Universal Music. Shares in the firm closed up 0.61 per cent at €23.10 in Paris. Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Brennan admits plenty to work on but pleased with players for ‘fighting til the bitter end’

first_img Pinterest TAGSAllianz Hurling League Division 1BEddie BrennanLaois senior hurling teamLaois v Galway Facebook New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Facebook Previous articleTwo Laois lads named on Kilkenny League Kennedy Cup squadNext articlePeavoy Financial Planning: Why leave your pension until the 11th hour?! Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. Pinterest Twitter Twitter By Siun Lennon – 28th January 2019 Community Laois hurling manager Eddie Brennan On what was a very tough assignment for Laois in the first round of the league, manager Eddie Brennan admits that there is plenty to work on, but is pleased with his side for sticking to the task.Indeed there was a 10 point difference in the first 17 minutes of the game – a period that any side could have crumbled under.While praising his side for not letting Galway run away with the game, he appears to be under no illusions of the cold, hard facts of the game.“We were under no illusions of what kind of task we were facing. But we asked the players to stick at it and you don’t throw in the towel. That was the one big thing that I would be proud of them in that regard, they stuck at it and fought to the bitter end,” said the Kilkenny native.“The reality is you don’t ever throw in the towel. Sometimes you know when you come up to a place like Galway and there’s not much expected of you that very easily it can turn into a massacre, and that was the only thing that we ask of the players – that they get stuck in and that they don’t throw in the towel.”In terms of the stages of the game, Laois were slow to start while Galway got scores on the board straight away – within the first 20 seconds of the ball being thrown-in.“There’s no excuses you know it is was it is. I said in the run up to this match it was going to be a benchmark of where we are.“You’d say that’s probably not near Galway’s championship team but they were moving very well as a team, very well organised.“I think there’s a few technically aspects today that really let us down. On another day you could be saying, ‘Well that might save us five or six points’. I think the first 15/20 minutes really hurt us today.“Again it’s something we’re working towards, we’re trying to get close to that kind of a level. Look a slow start definitely had an impact on that match,” said Brennan.He stressed the importance of taking lessons learned from the game going forward – first with Waterford, then for Dublin, Offaly and Carlow.“For me I always look at what I can take from it and I thought there was glimpses there in the first half of what we could do, albeit there’s 15 on the pitch and Galway took off some of their big hitters but we finished that match strong enough – we stayed at it. That’s the positive I take out of it.“We got a couple of good scores when the match was maybe dead but at the end of the day I’ll take it from where that match was looking like it was possibly going at some stage.“The perception would be that you have two big hitters early on but I don’t think there’s going to be any concession with Offaly or Carlow or Dublin for that matter. So we’re just going to have to get stuck in.When asked about whether there is a mindset to just keep the scores down against strong contenders for the All-Ireland championship – Brennan had this reponse.“I’d always be trying to look at the cup half full as opposed to half empty. We’ve plenty to work on so we just keep going and going at that’s it.“I suppose like anything to be honest you have to be real about what task you’re facing. But certainly our mindset is not to go in there and keep the score respectable. It’s to go out and get stuck in and see where we’re at and that’s what sport is about.“That for me is the philosophy of it. You measure yourself off the good teams and realistically when it comes to championship we’re not going to meet a team of the quality of Galway. We’ll just have to keep our shoulders to the wheel and keep working on a couple of aspects.“At times I think we showed some really good stuff, what I’d be hoping is that we can do more of that. Certainly maybe things that we’ve done in training we didn’t execute as well as we would have liked to today but I suppose that’s what it’s all about.“Some days they come off, some days they don’t when you’re up against quality opposition. But I’d be more than happy with how the match petered out for us because we could have very easily let the floodgates up there but we didn’t.”Laois are up against another Liam McCarthy challenger in the form of Waterford next Sunday in O’Moore Park.“If we can tidy up one or two bits and pieces and apply how we finished that match then I think we’ll be in a position to have a right cut at next weekend,” he concluded.SEE ALSO – Incredible Irish Times feature looks into the life story of Stradbally’s €30 million charity donor Elizabeth O’Kelly Brennan admits plenty to work on but pleased with players for ‘fighting til the bitter end’ Council WhatsApp Home Sport GAA Brennan admits plenty to work on but pleased with players for ‘fighting… SportGAAHurlingLaois Senior Hurling Team Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Community WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic yearlast_img read more

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Anti-Kim Leaflets Found in Hoiryeong

first_img Quoting a source from Chongjin, Free North Korea Radio (FNKR) reported yesterday that a large quantity of fliers criticizing the Kim Jong Il regime were distributed around Hoiryeong in North Hamkyung Province on or before June 25th. The security forces were apparently ordered to collect the fliers and investigate where they came from. “According to an official within the NSA, Hoiryeong NSA reported flier distribution in a certain region of the city, and said that members of the city NSA had been mobilized to block passage through the region and collect all the fliers,” the source reportedly explained. The source reprotedly added, “At 5AM on the 25th, Hoiryeong National Security Agency (NSA) mobilized its members to collect the fliers covertly.”He also said, “Hoiryeong NSA had finished collecting and incinerating the fliers by 11AM the same day. They were ordered to find the source of the fliers but keep it classified so that people would remain ignorant of the incident.” The correspondent added, “Therefore, the NSA has mobilized its agents in the region to investigate and find out whether there are people giving out the fliers or reading and copying the contents from them.” Anti-Kim Leaflets Found in Hoiryeong News AvatarNamgung Min SHARE Facebook Twitter North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest By Namgung Min – 2010.06.30 2:34pm News NewsEconomy News last_img read more

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Business Outlook Survey suggests business confidence up, Prairies still weak

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Stock buybacks to return after pandemic pause: Fitch Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Business outlookCompanies Bank of Canada Business confidence in Canada has edged higher as global trade tensions have eased, but the Prairies, hard hit by a drop in energy prices, continue to remain a weak spot, according to the latest outlook survey by the Bank of Canada.The central bank said Monday that its Business Outlook Survey, which is based on interviews with senior management at about 100 firms, found that outside of the energy-producing regions of the country, reports of improved indicators of future sales are widespread. Canadian money, twoonies, coins, calculator on desk osarieme/123RF CEOs shift focus to the “S” in ESG Canadian Press It said foreign demand, particularly from the U.S., continued to lift exports as businesses reported improved orders from foreign customers compared with a year ago.“In addition, with concerns around trade tensions declining somewhat, firms’ expectations for U.S. economy growth have recovered slightly,” the bank said in its report.“Many firms expect to benefit directly from U.S. demand, notably in construction and tourism industries. However, some reported dampened prospects due to protectionism and other U.S. policies that are more favourable to their U.S. competitors.”The central bank’s Business Outlook Survey also suggested that labour shortages are a key obstacle to meeting an unexpected rise in demand except in the Prairies where businesses continued to report limited capacity pressures.“Businesses in the Prairies continued to report limited capacity pressures, often citing weak demand and readily available labour,” the report said.The survey suggested the balance of opinion among businesses on investment in machinery and equipment edged lower, but still suggested companies plan to increase their capital spending in the next 12 months.“Many firms reported focusing their investments on efforts to increase efficiency, frequently including investments in technology,” the report said. “Intentions to increase investment spending are less widespread than in the previous survey, as more firms than usual reported having just completed large investment projects last year.In a special question as part of the Business Outlook Survey, the Bank of Canada asked firms about climate change.The bank said that more than half of the affected respondents noted negative impacts of climate change including the consequences of extreme weather and increased costs related to complying with climate-related policy and regulation. A third of affected firms noted positive impacts including new business opportunities such as growing demand for green technology.Meanwhile in a separate survey of consumer expectations, the bank said Canadians’ expectations for wage growth over the next year have held steady near 2%, just below their expectations for inflation.The new Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations also found mixed signals about the labour market as Canadians saw both an increased chance that they will leave their job voluntarily during the next 12 months and an increased probability that they will lose their job over the next year.Consumer expectations for home price growth edged higher in the fourth quarter as expectations rose in B.C., while expected growth in Alberta and Saskatchewan remained weak.The release of the Business Outlook Survey and Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations by the Bank of Canada came ahead of the central bank’s next interest rate decision set for Jan. 22 when it will also release its updated economic forecast in its quarterly monetary policy report.The Bank of Canada has kept its key interest rate on hold at 1.75% for more than a year even as other central banks around the world have moved to cut rates and loosen monetary policy in response to worries about the global economy.However, governor Stephen Poloz has kept the central bank’s key interest rate target on hold due to what he has said has been resilience in the Canadian economy.The Business Outlook Survey was conducted from Nov. 13, 2019, to Dec. 9, 2019.The Canadian Survey of Consumer Expectations is based on an online survey of approximately 2,000 households done in November.According to the polling industry’s generally accepted standards, online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population. Related news Households expect return to pre-pandemic spending within a year, Bank of Canada sayslast_img read more

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Regional women’s sport a winner with $50 million funding boost

first_imgRegional women’s sport a winner with $50 million funding boost Sports facilities across regional NSW will benefit from new and improved women’s change rooms and amenities thanks to $50 million in funding from the NSW Government’s $2 billion Regional Growth Fund.Deputy Premier John Barilaro and Acting Minister for Sport Geoff Lee today announced that Round Four of the $100 million Stronger Country Communities Fund will have a regional sports focus, with up to $50 million to be made available for the delivery and enhancement of women’s sporting facilities, including change rooms.Mr Barilaro said a lack of adequate facilities can be a barrier to female participation in sport and this funding will provide new and improved amenities to make it easier for girls and women to dominate on the field or courts.“The NSW Nationals are building a safer and stronger regional NSW and these new facilities will increase participation and allow women and girls to receive the social and health benefits associated with sport,” Mr Barilaro said.“Women have been flying the flag for Australian sport with our international teams achieving incredible status on the world platform, and many of these athletes come from regional communities.“Too many women participating in local soccer, AFL, rugby or cricket matches in rural and regional locations don’t have access to suitable changing facilities so the NSW Government has committed this funding to level the playing field.“Access to designated female change rooms will be of huge benefit to our future Matildas, Opals, Hockeyroos, Jillaroos and Wallaroos, as well as local athletes.”Mr Lee said the provision of new and improved female change rooms is a step that will encourage more women to step out on the court or field.“Some of Australia’s best sporting talents are women from regional NSW, and we want to see more females showcasing their talent at a grassroots level,” Mr Lee said.“In many areas of regional NSW there is a shortage of female dedicated change facilities and amenities which can be off-putting, so this funding will be a huge win for women and girls who would have otherwise been deterred from playing sport.”Minister for Women and Regional Youth Bronnie Taylor said women have been proudly stepping up to the plate, pitch or pool for years now and this next round of the Stronger Country Communities Fund will address a barrier for females when it comes to entering local and regional sport.“I know this funding will be warmly welcomed by female athletes in regional communities who will now face one less barrier to taking up a sport,” Mrs Taylor said.“Clubs and community sport provide friendship, fitness and a lot of fun and I’m delighted that this funding has been made available as a means of boosting participation in women’s sport.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AFL, athletes, Australia, Australian, building, community, cricket, fitness, Government, Liberal Party, Minister, NSW, nswpol, Premier, soccer, winner, women, Youthlast_img read more

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Statement on passing of former PNG PM Sir Michael Somare

first_imgStatement on passing of former PNG PM Sir Michael Somare Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has expressed her condolences at the passing of long-serving former Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea, Grand Chief Sir Michael Somare.“Our thoughts are with Lady Veronica Somare and family, Prime Minister James Marape and the people of Papua New Guinea during this time of great sadness,” said Jacinda Ardern.“Sir Michael Somare was an influential figure in leading Papua New Guinea to independence in 1975, when he became the country’s first Prime Minister.“He is widely respected as Papua New Guinea’s ‘Papa blo Kantri’ – Father of the Nation – and had a leadership role as a statesman of the Pacific. He was Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea from 1975-1980, 1982-1985 and 2002-2011 and served as a politician for a remarkable five decades, from 1968-2017. He will be deeply missed,” said Jacinda Ardern.He tai ka ripiripia te tai a te moana, arā te tai o ākeāke. Kauria te moana o whakaaro nui e te Rangatira moe mai raa – kia au te moe. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Ardern, Family, Father, Government, Guinea, leadership, Minister, New Zealand, pacific, Papua New Guinea, PM, Prime Ministerlast_img read more

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Schools and colleges to benefit from boost in expert mental health support

first_imgSchools and colleges to benefit from boost in expert mental health support More than £17 million announced to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges, part of Government’s commitment to build back better for every young personNew funding to train thousands of senior mental health leads, for school and college staff and to provide helpful resourcesBuilds on Government’s commitment to making mental health and wellbeing a central part of education recovery workThousands of children and young people will benefit from better support and expert advice in school and college thanks to a new multi-million package of mental health support designed to help them recover from the challenges of the pandemic.As part of Mental Health Awareness week, the Government has today (Monday 10 May) announced more than £17 million to build on mental health support already available in education settings, as it continues to prioritise wellbeing alongside academic recovery.Up to 7,800 schools and colleges in England will be offered funding worth £9.5 million to train a senior mental health lead from their staff in the next academic year, part of the Government’s commitment to offering this training to all state schools and colleges by 2025.Funding also includes a new £7 million Wellbeing for Education Recovery programme, which provides free expert training, support and resources for staff dealing with children and young people experiencing additional pressures from the last year – including trauma, anxiety, or grief. The programme builds on the success of the Department for Education’s Wellbeing for Education Return, used by more than 90% of councils since its launch last summer.Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said:“I know how difficult the pandemic has been for many children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing, and the next few months will be crucial in supporting their recovery. Getting back into the classroom was a vital step in this process but success in school and college goes beyond an excellent education – as parents we want our children to feel settled, calm and happy while they learn.“That’s why we’re providing new funding to make experts available for support, advice and early intervention or specialist help, so every young person knows who and where to turn to as we build back better after the pandemic.”The Department for Education will also fund an adapted ‘Link’ programme which is designed to improve partnerships between health and education leaders in local areas, raise awareness of mental health concerns and improve referrals to specialist help when needed.The next Mental Health in Education Action Group, to take place on Monday 24 May, will continue to build on this support for all education settings, staff, parents, children and young people. Led by Ministers, and including Youth Mental Health Ambassador Dr Alex George, the work aims to better align the education and mental health sectors, including charities, to address concerns among leaders and staff about how best to support their pupils and students post-pandemic.Children and Families Minister Vicky Ford said:“The past year has been incredibly difficult for so many children and young people whose resilience in the face of so much change has been heroic . Staff have been working so hard to support their pupils so I’m thrilled to be able to reassure them that we’re increasing funding, specialist support and training materials /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Ambassador, children, early intervention, education, Ford, Government, health, mental health, Minister, pandemic, resilience, resources, Secretary, students, UK, UK Government, wellbeing, Youthlast_img read more

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Opici Wines’ Market St. Spirits Expands Portfolio with Global Best-Selling Highland…

first_imgHome Industry News Releases Opici Wines’ Market St. Spirits Expands Portfolio with Global Best-Selling Highland Queen…Industry News ReleasesSpirits BusinessOpici Wines’ Market St. Spirits Expands Portfolio with Global Best-Selling Highland Queen WhiskiesBy Press Release – May 21, 2019 118 0 Twitter Pinterest Share Email TAGSConsumerHighland QueenMarket Street SpiritsOpici Wines AdvertisementGlen Rock, NJ, May 21, 2019 – Market St. Spirits, a division of Opici Wines, continues its move into high gear with the addition of world-renowned Highland Queen Blended Scotch Whiskies. Founded in 2014, Market St. is dedicated to building a portfolio reflecting quality and craftsmanship across the price spectrum. Fully complementing Market St.’s Tullibardine Single Malt Scotch Whisky range, the addition of the independent family-owned, award-winning Highland Queen Whiskies are poised to deliver carefully curated, hand-crafted blended offerings at exceptionally attractive price-quality tiers.Highland Queen Blended Scotch Whiskies have a long, fine provenance. The whisky was originally created in Leith, Edinburgh, using time-honored techniques dictated by Roderick Macdonald of Macdonald & Muir. Roderick invested in the finest whisky stocks, taking a decade to finesse the expertly crafted blend. The golden liquid was named Highland Queen’, inspired by the Port of Leith’s association with Mary, the ‘Queen of Scots’ who landed there from France in 1561. Loved by tastemakers across the world, Highland Queen is an expertly matured, mellowed and blended whisky with a well-rounded smooth finish.“The addition of Highland Queen brings great satisfaction in knowing these exceptionally crafted, award-winning selections fill a compelling price-value position for Market St. Spirits.” says Don Opici, Market St. Managing Director. “The Highland Queen range will bolster our core offerings and further define our unique footprint in the marketplace.”Market St. is pleased to offer the Highland Queen portfolio of whiskies comprising:Highland Queen — $16.99 SRPSherry Cask Finish — $18.99 SRPHighland Queen 1561 — $29.99 SRP1561 – 30 Year Old — $199.99 SRP“We are delighted to grow our relationship with Market St. Spirits” says Matthew Johns, Director for Terroir Distillers. “The US market continues to be a bright spot for our Tullibardine range of Single Malt scotch whiskies and now the addition of Highland Queen further elevates our presence across the U.S.” About Market St. SpiritsFocusing on artisanal spirits, Market St. Spirits is a division of Opici Wines. The award-winning portfolio includes Tullibardine Single Malt Scotch Whiskies, the Temple Bar Irish Whiskies Line, Rebellion bourbon and rye, Brinley Shipwreck rums, Distilllerie Franciacorta grappas, Ready-to-enjoy Negroni Cocktail and Meletti liqueurs. Founded in 1913, family-owned fine wine importer Opici is today in the capable hands of the fourth generation, represented by Don Opici. The company was recently honored as “Importer of the Year.”Advertisement Facebook ReddIt Linkedin Previous articleAuction of Washington Wines Anticipates Its Largest Private Barrel Auction to DateNext articleEstal Commits to Innovation and Launches Internationally Its Groundbreaking Sommelier Bottle Press Releaselast_img read more

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AVA Update: SLO to Be Recognized

first_imgEmail Share Twitter Linkedin Advertisementby Andrew ChalkAsk the American wine consumer to describe San Luis Obispo wine and they will likely tell you about the Paso Robles AVA, its pioneering role in growing Rhône varieties, its first class cabernet sauvignon, and the large number of startup wineries experimenting with pinot noir and any number of specialized grapes. But they may miss is the important work being done ‘over the grade’, on the other side of the Santa Lucia Mountains, in the southern part of the county adjacent to the Pacific Coast.That is the preserve of the SLO Coast Wine Collective (the Collective) and the 30 wineries (out of 35 in the area) that are members. At the moment, ‘SLO Coast’ is a marketing slogan and a battle cry but the intention is to enshrine the area’s distinctiveness in an umbrella “SLO Coast” AVA. It would include the part of San Luis Obispo within five-ten miles of the Pacific Ocean. The SLO Coast is overlaid on two existing AVAs, Edna Valley and Arroyo Grande Valley. Some of the proposed AVA would be SLO County land that is currently not in either of those two smaller AVAs. In the interim, the Collective focuses on getting the SLO Coast better known among consumers and beverage professionals.They have their work cut out if a couple of recent things are any indication. First, the October 15th, 2019  issue of The Wine Spectator, the largest circulation consumer wine publication in the U.S., lead with California Pinot Noir – The Next Great Red. The Spectator stressed coastal climate and discussed several Central Coast neighbors such as the Monterey, Santa Lucia Highlands, Santa Maria Valley and Santa Rita Hills but did not mention Edna Valley or Arroyo Grande (I refer to these as the SLO Coast AVAs).Why ignore the SLO Coast AVAs? It would be understandable if they made inferior wine, so I looked at the Wine Spectator’s own tasting notes of over 600 California pinot noirs in the aforementioned issue of the magazine. The average score for wines in either the Edna Valley AVA or the Arroyo Grande Valley AVA was 89.8. Other Central Coast AVA averages were Monterey (87.6), Santa Lucia Highlands (89.8), Santa Maria Valley (89.6) and Santa Rita Hills (89.8). In other words, the average quality in the SLO Coast AVAs was comparable to other Central Coast AVAs that were seen as promising areas for pinot noir.The Wine Spectator may have been influenced by the highest scoring wines in each AVA, in which case the high scores by appellation were SLO Coast (92), Monterey (91), Santa Lucia Highlands (94), Santa Maria Valley (92), and Santa Rita Hills (93). Some of these areas have slightly higher maximum scores than the SLO Coast AVAs. There is a case for saying that wine growing areas should be judged by their highest scores. However, if their average is no higher as a result of the high scoring wines, it implies that there are low scoring wines offsetting them. Maybe an area’s overall suitability for a grape should be measured by the performance of the average winery?The other factor explaining the omission of SLO Coast wines is that the area is small and consequently it got overlooked. One factor supporting this theory is that most of the wineries that I tasted at on a recent visit to the area were not even in the Wine Spectator’s results. Possibly for the same reason, the Spectator had small sample sizes for many AVAs.Media aside, SLO Coast is almost a stealth region on the ground. On U.S. 101, the major road through the area, and one of the busiest freeways in the state, there is virtually no signage informing travellers of the vineyards’ existence.Given its proximity to the population centres of San Francisco, Los Angeles, and silicon valley, and increased flights from the recently expanded airport (unfortunately coded SBP instead of SLO) the potential for increased onsite visitation is huge. Few wine areas in the world can have closer proximity to their airport. Outside the tasting room of Tolosa you can virtually count the rivets on the planes as they pass overhead. What those travellers will discover is an area with a funky beach scene, a good selection of restaurants, spectacular coastal beauty, and abundant wines.LocationSLO Coast is defined as the seafront side of the coastal Santa Lucia Mountain range in San Luis Obispo County. It starts as a thin strip in the north (in Cambria, where the mountains are right up against the coastline) and begins to widen as you head southward toward Edna Valley and into Arroyo Grande Valley, which runs east-west.Most important, is the Pacific Ocean to the west. The area is unequivocally maritime in climate with fog from the ocean blanketing many of the vineyards into the late morning. The Collective estimates that the average distance between member vineyards and the coast is five miles, making the influence of the ocean primal among climate forces.Discussion of location also draws attention to SLO coast as a valley region with rolling hills but an absence of mountainside vineyards. Most of the SLO coast lies below 350 feet elevation. The constant ocean breezes provide the cooling that altitude otherwise might.TerroirSuch is the ocean influence that SLO coast is ranked as region 1 (coolest) on the Amarine-Winkler scale of California winegrowing areas. Harvest can extend into November. The Collective actually considers it to be the coolest region in California, although they may find themselves in a food fight with the wineries of Santa Maria Valley on that question.Winemakers of the SLO Coast emphasize the importance of ocean influence to achieve a long growing season in which the grapes experience a large diurnal range throughout the day. This gives them adequate time to achieve physiological ripeness.The effect of the temperature profile is that cool climate grapes like chardonnay, pinot noir, albariño, riesling, gewürztraminer and pinot gris fare well. Grenache is widely grown but can struggle to get ripe. Likewise Syrah. I asked Frederick Delivert of Tolosa why he did not grow cabernet sauvignon and he said that he thought it unlikely to consistently ripen. Taking 2018 as an example: bud break was in March. Harvest started Aug. 23rd. His last pick was November 12th. The picking order was pinot noir rose->pinot noir->chardonnay->viognier->sauvignon blanc->2 week break->petite sirah->syrah->grenache. Zack Geers, winemaker at Claiborne & Churchill, confirms that he has the same late ripening issue with his Grenache.Pinot noir is the SLO Coast grape doing the best in the market at the present time, followed by chardonnay. The importance of albariño is growing as it receives consumer recognition, but from a very small planted base.If the climatic side of terroir can be singularly attributed to the ocean, the earth side is a tapestry of over 60 types of soil. As a result, a journey through a large vineyard is often a journey through separate lots distinguished by their soil. Different soil types support different types of grapes best so, for example, rich, heavy clay soil is planted with sauvignon blanc. Sandy soil is better for pinot noir clone 828, or the pommard clone. These two also thrive in the limestone tracts.Grape VarietiesPinot NoirPinot noir is the most prevalent grape, being produced by most SLO Coast wineries. At a focused tasting of eight producers, Coby Parker-Garcia of El Lugar and Bill Kesselring of Peloton Cellars discussed generalities and specificities of the wines.Coby Parker-Garcia stressed that the method of pinot noir winemaking in SLO Coast is no different than in other regions of California. Differences in the wines are accounted for by the terroir (soil and climate). What generalizations can be made about Edna Valley? The wines are characterized by high acidity due to the cool climate. This enhances their longevity. The best clones are the Dijon clones. Clone 667 performs poorly and clone 777 has a hard time with berry size. A majority, he estimates 70%, of winemakers inoculate their yeast. Only a few do wild fermentations. Growers pick on acid numbers, not brix numbers.  Bud break is relatively early. There is a relatively long growing season with cooler temperatures. Among the many soil types, grapes grown in sandy soils produce more intense aromatics. Those in clay, more structure. As to marker differences between Edna Valley and Arroyo Grande Valley there really aren’t any. It may be a little warmer in Arroyo Grande due to it being further inland. Were consideration of separate AVAs to be done today, it is not clear that they would be approved.The first wine that we taste is the 2016 Effort Pinot Noir from Edna Valley ($30). Effort is one of three brands from Center of Effort, a peculiar name that conjures up images of a Dickensian home for orphan boys who failed their winemaking exams. In fact, it refers to the point in a sail where the wind’s force is greatest. The brands, in increasing order of price, are Fossil Point, Effort, and Center of Effort. The wines (above Fossil Point) are all estate, an area of approximately 100 acres that is the old Corbett Canyon facility. That estate is mainly sandy soils which contributes to bigger, more aromatic wines in which color saturation is not a problem. They use 20-30% new French oak. 2016 Baileyana Pinot Noir – Halcon Rojo, Edna Valley ($35). This winery is owned by the Niven family. John Niven was one of the pioneers planting in the Edna Valley. The grapes originate from the Firepeak Vineyard (the name of the wine refers to a particular lot in that vineyard) which was planted 20 years ago. He chose chardonnay, cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon, gewürztraminer, riesling, and zinfandel. It is a sign of how early he was in SLO Coast terroir knowhow that now the vineyard consists of chardonnay, pinot gris, pinot noir, and syrah- a complete changeover. The soils are all volcanic, comprised of heavy clay. The wine was aged in 30% new French oak. The wine is, in Coby’s words, “easy drinking”. He attributes the sweet vanilla and toast notes to the oak.The effect of clay soils was evident in the 2017 El Lugar, Rincon Vineyards, Arroyo Grande Valley ($48). The Rincon Vineyards are 8 miles from the ocean and therefore warmer. The volcanic,  clay-dominant soils produce more structured wines from the Swiss clone Talley 2A vines. The grapes are given a 3-4 day cold soak and 15% are fermented whole cluster. Coby uses the same cooperage with all red El Lugar wines and toast levels (medium to medium-plus). The wine is aged in 30% new oak for 11 months. Once in barrels the wine is not moved and sees no punchdowns or pumpovers. The effect of extreme low temperatures is evident in the 2016 Cutruzzola Vineyards Pinot Noir, Giacomo Reserve, San Luis Obispo County. The Giacomo Vineyard is in the far north of the county, almost as far as Cambria. Bill Kesselring describes how, at 7am, the fog is so think as you drive through your vineyard that you cannot see the hood of your truck. By 10am it is clear. But at 4pm the fog rolls back in. Extreme weather patterns see temperatures exhibit a diurnal swing from 55oF to 85oF in a day. The vineyard is sandy loam on rock planted with 4 clones of pinot (667, 828, pommard, 115) and riesling vines. It is a scant producer, yielding 1.5 tons/acre if lucky. Irrigation is from a spring underneath a sycamore tree. This wine is fermented with native yeast, undergoes 10% whole cluster fermentation and is aged in 30%-50% new French oak. The result is powerful wines.Mindy OliverAll of the wines exhibit accomplished winemaking and they would acquit themselves well in a tasting with pinot noirs from other regions. Their relative lack of publicity and the outdated AVA setup in the area may be to blame for their anonymity.ChardonnayChardonnay styles reflect the cool climate of the SLO Coast. Less exuberantly fruity than Sonoma and generally crafted in a leaner style. That said, they do not vere as far to being reserved as the wines of, for example, Chablis.. Good examples are Biddle Ranch Vineyard, Chamisal Vineyards, Edna Valley Vineyards, Filipponi Ranch, Kelsey See Canyon Winery, Laetitia, Oceano, Sinor-LaVallee, Talley Vineyards, and Tolosa.AlbariñoFor sheer enigma, the progress of the Spanish albariño grape in the SLO Coast warrants ongoing attention. Plantings, only 55 acres (2018 data), account for 20% of the albariño in the state. Far from being a one off there are at least nine wineries working with the grape.The Niven Family, owners of Tangent, made the biggest investment in albariño, planting 45 acres in their Paragon Vineyard. They based the investment on research that included interviewing Spanish winemakers.I asked Mindy Oliver from albariño producer Croma Vera some questions about albariño in the SLO Coast.AC: How does SLO Coast albariño compare with albariño from Rias Baixas, the Galician region with which the grape is most usually associated? MO: I feel there are more similarities than differences between Albariños from Rias Baixas, Spain and the SLO Coast wine region.Similarities: richness on the palate, viscosity, tropical aromatics, citrus flavors, salinity/mineralityDifferences: SLO Coast Albariños exhibit more high tone aromatics such as boxwood, guava, passion fruit and even an herbaceous edge.In terms of climate, O Rosal in Rias Baixas, and SLO Coast vineyards both have a ridge of mountains separating the seashore from the vineyards and similar annual temperatures throughout the growing season. However, rainfall is three to four times higher in O Rosal than here.AC: How big a part of Cromo Vera’s sales did she see albariño becoming?MO: The popularity of Albariño is on the rise as more wine drinkers are discovering it. It is our most requested and top-selling wine at our tasting room. A few years ago, many of our customers had not heard of Albariño. Now we get customers seeking us out specifically for our Albariño. Why? Albariño is a white wine that appeals to both red and white wine drinkers, which I believe will continue to propel its rise in popularity. It’s nice to see the interest in one of my favorite Spanish grapes.AC: Is there was anything else that she thought was important that the media say about SLO Coast albariño?MO: What’s unique about our wine region: The ocean’s close proximity and influence creates our longer growing season, allowing Albariño to ripen to full flavor while preserving acidity. This is what makes our wine region ideal for growing aromatic, vibrant white varietals such as Albariño.This is an exciting time to be making wine in this region. Our region is beginning to earn praise as more and more wine consumers are discovering not just the beauty of the area and the warm hospitality, but the high quality of our wines.Here’s a quote from our winemaker:‘Albariño is well-suited to maritime climates such as ours. Our cool climate, with close proximity to the ocean, preserves the intense tropical aromatics that Albariño is best known for.’Jeremy Leffert, Winemaker, Croma VeraHere are reports on some albariños tasted….Croma Vera made a 2018 albariño Spanish Springs Vineyard and appellated San Luis Obispo County. It has aromas of lemon and grapefruit. The zesty flavors on the palate make for a wine that is not barren or characterless. The grapes were whole-cluster fermented in stainless steel. Not subject to malolactic fermentation. Ageing was conducted in stainless steel and neutral oak for four months but sur lie (on the expired yeast).Stephen Ross Wine Cellars also uses fruit from Spanish Springs Vineyard. They age in stainless steel sur lies but the 2017 underwent 100% malolactic fermentation. The result is what the winery calls “mid-palate juiciness”. It still has abundant acidity, flavors of lemon, and a complex nose of citrus, fig preserves, and herbaceous hints.Tangent, 2018 Stone Egg Albariño was fermented in a concrete stone egg which is thought to promote circulation of the wine, adding more flavor and depth. The fruit was the best grapes selected from the Niven Family’s Estate Paragon Vineyard. That is one of the largest single plantings outside Spain. This wine is fermented and aged for a total of 9 months entirely in an egg-shaped concrete tank. The results are a richly fruity wine (lemon, peach, apricot) with medium plus body.  All of these wines are well made and suggest that albariño has a long-term future in the SLO Coast. With the increase in consumer interest in the grape the commercial environment should be supportive as well. One of the most remarkable comments that I heard in my time on the SLO Coast was Mindy Oliver’s response to my question asking how big albariño is:  “It is our most requested and top-selling wine at our tasting room”. Compelling.An Odd DuckClaiborne & Churchill Winery deserves special mention by virtue of its singular mission being so out in left field – to make Alsatian style wine. If was founded in 1983 by recovering academics, Claiborne (Clay) Thompson and Fredericka Churchill Thompson, from Michigan. Clay had a dream to start a winery and came to Edna Valley where he was hired as a cellar rat by Dick Graff at Edna Valley on the strength of his Harvard Ph.D. in languages because Graff was a fellow Harvard man (degree in musicology). He learned winemaking and set about pursuing the goal of a winery dedicated to the wines of Alsace, initially making the wine in Edna Valley’s cellar. Hence, today Claiborne & Churchill produces gewürztraminer, pinot gris, pinot noir, and riesling because of their Alsace connection. They also make chardonnay (but not as a sparkling wine as in Alsace), syrah and grenache to support market demand. With only 8,000 cases a year, things are distinctly artisan.A tasting of their 2018 Dry Gewürztraminer, Central Coast ($24) reveals a wine that is one of the few domestic gewürztraminers that can legitimately refer to Alsace as its muse. Even the aromatic element of lychee is there in the nose. This wine would be ideal with many Thai or Vietnamese dishes.The 2018 Dry Riesling, Edna Valley ($24) displayed a floral nose and lemon and apricot in the mouth. It should prove versatile in the face of multiple foods from fish to clams or mussels, pork, and Thanksgiving turkey.A Notable VineyardThere are many lieu dites (named vineyards) on the SLO Coast, but one name crops up as often as all the others put together: Spanish Springs Vineyard. It is only 91 acres, however, I found the following current (or recent) customers (a list that is likely not exhaustive):Biddle Ranch Vineyard – 2016 Pinot Noir;Claiborne & Churchill – 2017 Syrah;Cromavera – 2018 Albariño;Evening Land – 2010 Pinot Noir;Oceano – 2017 Chardonnay, 2018 Pinot Noir;Olsen Perry – 2015 Chardonnay;Peloton – 2017 Pinot Noir;Stephen Ross – 2017, 2018 Albariño, 2017 Pinot Gris;Wonderwall – 2017 Chardonnay, 2017 Pinot Noir;Located in San Luis Obispo county, but not in any AVA, on Spanish Springs Drive just off Price Canyon Road, Spanish Springs Vineyard is 1.2  miles from the Pacific Ocean. It is sandy loam soil and, by way of example, its block 1 is on a 7.6% slope with a southeast (146.01o) aspect and 112 feet elevation. It receives an average 2088.43 growing degree days (making it Region 1) and a growing season average temperature of 59.7oF. Referring to plantings, pinot noir is clones 828, 2A, Mt Eden, 114, Pommard, 943, and Swan. Chardonnay clones are Wente and Musque. Original planting dates were 2007-9 in a high density VSP formation with 1361 vines per acre on 8×4 spacing and drip irrigation. Farming practises are sustainable. Farmer and manager is George Donati who may be, from the standpoint of the wine consumer, the most profound behind-the-scenes architect of the wines of the SLO Coast.An AssessmentSLO Coast wines reflect their coastal climate, the diverse grapes that the vignerons grow, and the skills that the winemakers bring to their craft. They hold their heads level, on average, with other Central Coast wines the area’s small size has prevented it getting the recognition that it deserves. As consumers taste more of these wines I expect this to change.My accommodation and flight costs were paid by the “SLO Coast Wine Collective” TAGSAndrew ChalkConsumerExpert EditorialfeaturedSLO Coast Wine CollectiveSLO Wine Country About the Author:Andrew Chalk is a Dallas-based author who writes about wine, spirits, beer, food, restaurants, wineries and destinations all over the world.  His articles have appeared in Wine Business, Wines & Vines, Go-Wine, The Daily Meal,  John Mariani’s Virtual Gourmet, Somm Journal, Wine-Searcher.com, Palate Press, and Modern Lifestyles. He has also written for The Dallas Morning News, D Magazine, and Food and Beverage Magazine.  A full listing of his recent articles can be found here. He is the author of the book Top Texas Wineries. He recently started his own blog, TheChalkReport. He holds the WSET Level 3 certification in wines and spirits, the Certified Specialist of Wine certification from the Society of Wine Educators and the Italian Wine Professional certification. He is a 2016 recipient of an open fellowship to the Symposium for Professional Wine Writers.He has judged at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo Wine Competition and the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo International Wine Competition.When not writing he can usually be found participating in his favorite sport of soccer. He also likes cooking, at which he is lousy, but enthusiastic.Advertisement center_img Facebook ReddIt Home Wine Business Editorial Expert Editorial AVA Update: SLO to Be RecognizedWine Business EditorialExpert EditorialAVA Update: SLO to Be RecognizedBy Expert Editorial – November 27, 2019 1341 0 Pinterest Previous articleAre You Ready for the Weekend?Next articleLet Vintrace Help You Run Your Winery in a Simpler Way Expert Editoriallast_img read more

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Police to Receive Protective Gear

first_imgRelatedJamaica to Extend Further Support to Dominica RelatedInformation Minister Hails Winston Sill as ‘One Of The Country’s Finest’ Cabinet has awarded a contract valued at US$771,000 to American firm, Armor Express, for the provision of protective equipment for the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).The items include 1, 500 ballistic vests, 1, 000 ballistic helmets and 500 helmet shields.Speaking at Jamaica House press briefing on Wednesday, September 9 at the Office of the Prime Minister in Kingston, Minister with responsibility for Information, Senator the Hon. Sandrea Falconer, said the acquisition of these pieces of equipment is critical for the safety and protection of police personnel.She informed that the funds have been budgeted for in the recurrent budget for 2015/16.“The provision and distribution of these critical security equipment to police personnel will provide personal protection and reduce serious injuries while on duty,” she noted.Ms. Falconer said JCF statistics show that between 2012 and 2014, a total of 38 police personnel were injured on duty.She said it is important that the police are equipped and protected to face challenges on the job.The last purchase of ballistic vests for the JCF was made in 2013.Headquartered in Central Lake, Michigan, Armor Express designs, develops, manufactures and distributes a full line of high performance hard and soft body armour, helmets and other accessories for law enforcement, military, correctional and other tactical personnel. RelatedJamaican Independence: A Timeline FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img Police to Receive Protective Gear InformationSeptember 10, 2015Written by: Chris Patterson Story HighlightsThe items include 1, 500 ballistic vests, 1, 000 ballistic helmets and 500 helmet shields.Minister with responsibility for Information, Senator the Hon. Sandrea Falconer, said the acquisition of these pieces of equipment is critical for the safety and protection of police personnel.She informed that the funds have been budgeted for in the recurrent budget for 2015/16. Advertisementslast_img read more

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